BC Fishing Reports banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to be buying an 8wt rod this year for salmon. Don't really know too much about rods and such. Have a couple of 5 wts in 2 pc configuration. But am wondering whether to get a 2 or 4 pc? What are the benefits, pros and cons of each? Are the 4 pc as strong? Is it just about packability?

Thank for your input :beerchug:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
It used to be the case where going with a 4piece compromised rod action, but these days the 4 piece rods are just as nice as the 2 piece rods in any reputable maker.

Pro's I guess are Packability, and Storage.

Cons would be assmebly, take-down, and checking a coulpe more ferrules while fishing

These days I prefer 4 piece rods simply be cause I got alot and they take up less room here and in the truck when we go fishing ;D
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,859 Posts
my dad bought an ECHO 10' 8wt in a 4peice and this rod is amazing, very strong and great action. If you have a rod case that can fit a 10' 2pc then you can just pop a 4pc in half and slide it in reel and all. this is how he stores his.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
As eimaj said, these days the ferrule technology is so good that it's no longer really a compromise to have multi-piece rods. The rods I use currently are 3,4, and even 5 piece rods...the 2 piece rods are sitting in the closet. The 4 piece rod is somewhat ideal because as stated above, it can still be broken down into two pieces if needed.

I'd go 4 piece all the way if the same rod was available in that configuration.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,859 Posts
I agree with that ;D I look for 4 pc when getting my new fly rods :thumbup: any of you guys own on of those 6pc or 7pc travel rods? how are they? I however am not a big fan of the 3pc rods, it just seems like a goofy way to take the rod apart because you cant half the rod like you can with a 2 or 4
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I have an old 6 peice 5wt. 7"9". A great little travel rod. I use it for back packing trips and as a back up
for when we fly to Alaska or Colorado. It is like I said an old rod, fiberglass. It was given to my dad in 1970
when he retired from the Air Force, still casts like the day he got it. Nice thing about it is how small it is when
it is broken down, in it's case it is only 16 inches long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Hmm...good point about the 3 piece rod Hook, I never thought of it like that. Like you I could not imagine fishing a rod that you could not break down when the bushwacking is about to start! Thanks for bringing that up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Hey FIRE, go with the four piece. They are easy to hide in vehicals, and easy to travel with. I have a 5 wt 4 pc, 6wt 4 pc, and a 7 wt 3 pc, and the 4 pc is alot easier to bushwack with and travel around with. Castability isnt compromised these days with a 4 pc compared to a 2 pc. Let me know what your thinking about buying there Jeff and maybe I can give you a bit of insight and an extra opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Yup, as mentioned in the past you lost alot of the action in the rod with more pieces but now it makes very little if any noticeable difference in rods. Some people still dont trust them for one reason or another but I believe that the pros definately outweigh the cons. Sure it may take an extra 30 seconds to line up the eyes and attach ferrules but heck if it will fit in my bag rather than being a PITA I am willing to spare the time. My sage is a 3 piece and so far its one of the lightest and most sensitive rods I have yet to use (mind you I haven't used all that many, but a variety of sizes, makes and weights) and this is more noticeable I believe on this rod as it is merely a 3 wt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I always go with the fewest sections as possible. The more sections a rod has the heavier they become.
Why would you want to add more ferrels to your rod? With with the least you can get away with.
I would NEVER go with more then three pieces to a rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Float Fisher said:
I always go with the fewest sections as possible. The more sections a rod has the heavier they become.
Why would you want to add more ferrels to your rod? With with the least you can get away with.
I would NEVER go with more then three pieces to a rod.
So...on Sage's website, a typical rod that someone might purchase would be the Fli 9' 6wt. The 2-piece 690 Fli is listed at 3 9/16 oz, while the 4-piece 690-4 Fli is listed at 3 5/8 oz. What you're telling me, is that you think you would feel the extra 1/16 of an ounce that the extra two ferrules are going to add to this rod, outweighing the benefits of being able to break it down into a fairly small package for travelling? And if given a choice, you would rather put up with the awkward way a 3-piece rod breaks down rather than go to a 4-piece rod and be able to make the choice of breaking it down to two or four pieces? ??? :wallbash:

Well, your logic might work for you, but most people see it the other way, and more and more flyrod companies are offering the option of a multi-piece rod, or offering rods only in 4-piece configurations. The only reason I have a couple of 3-piece and a few 2-piece rods is because they were bought a long time ago when they only came in that configuration, and they are awesome rods.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,859 Posts
I have also noticed what Stone mentioned. there is alot of rod suppliers out there that only make 2 or 4 pc and alot the only make 4pc rods. my 5wt rods are both 2pc because they are a few yrs old and 4pcs werent more of the norm yet. Would i buy 4pc now? hell yes i would :thumbup: my dad bought a 4pc 8wt recently and it is very light and is actually a nicer rod than my 2pc 8wt i have. The spey rod i just bought is obvioulsy a 4pc and one of the lightest spey rods i have ever put in my hands, I love it and very glad i didnt get the 3pc i hummed and haahd over.

I will probably never buy a 2 or 3 pc rod again with the 4pc models being as good or better nowadays
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
stone said:
Float Fisher said:
I always go with the fewest sections as possible. The more sections a rod has the heavier they become.
Why would you want to add more ferrels to your rod? With with the least you can get away with.
I would NEVER go with more then three pieces to a rod.
So...on Sage's website, a typical rod that someone might purchase would be the Fli 9' 6wt. The 2-piece 690 Fli is listed at 3 9/16 oz, while the 4-piece 690-4 Fli is listed at 3 5/8 oz. What you're telling me, is that you think you would feel the extra 1/16 of an ounce that the extra two ferrules are going to add to this rod, outweighing the benefits of being able to break it down into a fairly small package for travelling? And if given a choice, you would rather put up with the awkward way a 3-piece rod breaks down rather than go to a 4-piece rod and be able to make the choice of breaking it down to two or four pieces? ??? :wallbash:

Well, your logic might work for you, but most people see it the other way, and more and more flyrod companies are offering the option of a multi-piece rod, or offering rods only in 4-piece configurations. The only reason I have a couple of 3-piece and a few 2-piece rods is because they were bought a long time ago when they only came in that configuration, and they are awesome rods.

Stone,
It isnt just the blank that makes the weight difference. :wallbash:
It is a combination of everything...the blank, the extra wrapping needed (since there is more ferrels) , the extra epoxy needed for the wrapping, typically 4 piece rods need/have more guides then a rod with fewer sections. So now your talking more thread wrap and epoxy on the extra guides.....
All of these things just add onto the overall weight.
My original point I was trying to make was really just "why would someone want to add anymore weight then what's really needed".

Dont get me wrong though, 4 piece blanks have there applications and I bet some people on here probably bought a Ronco Pocket Fisherman too. :beerchug:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,812 Posts
Float Fisher said:
Stone,
It isnt just the blank that makes the weight difference. :wallbash:
It is a combination of everything...the blank, the extra wrapping needed (since there is more ferrels) , the extra epoxy needed for the wrapping, typically 4 piece rods need/have more guides then a rod with fewer sections. So now your talking more thread wrap and epoxy on the extra guides.....
All of these things just add onto the overall weight.
My original point I was trying to make was really just "why would someone want to add anymore weight then what's really needed".

Dont get me wrong though, 4 piece blanks have there applications and I bet some people on here probably bought a Ronco Pocket Fisherman too. :beerchug:
Float fisher-Maybe you should go check out the sage website. The figures Stone gave you are for a finished, complete rod, not a blank. Typically the difference in weight between a 2 and a 4 piece rod is 1/16 to 1/8 of an ounce. If you could tell the difference between them blindfolded, I'd happily buy one for you. How much do you think a ferrule wrap and epoxy weighs?? Looking at the web sites of various manufacturers, I'd say about 1/32 ounce or less. Having built a number of rods both 2 and 4 piece, I can tell you, I have yet to find a 4 piece that has even 1 more guide than than the equivalent 2 piece. That includes Sage, G Loomis and Rainshadow/Forecast. There may be reasons why you wouldn't want to buy a 4 piece rod, but the citing a virtually nonexistent weight difference seems spurious. I only own 2 four piece rods (and one is my spey) but I can see more in my future, if only because 2 peice rods are harder to find every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Float Fisher...I have built rods before, and I don't understand where you're coming from. Yes, those rod weights from Sage's website are for finished rods, not blanks. I've never heard of multi-piece rods needing more guides than their 2 piece counterparts...but then I've only built a couple of flyrods and I'm not an expert in it. Far as I can tell, the number of guides has more to do with the rod length and action than the number of pieces it has.

For the record, I have...

2 pc - 2 rods
3 pc - 3 rods
4 pc - 4 rods
5 pc - 2 rods

All flyrods/speyrods of different line weights from 3 to 9wt. The 5 piece rods are just as smooth and seamless as the 2 piece rods, and I can cast them all day without feeling the weight.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top