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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I am thinking about getting a new rod and reel and can't decide on what weight I should be using. I will use the rod for stillwaters only and will try to get in the habit of casting. I currently own a 5wt HMX with a BFR reel. I like the set up but got to admit I can't cast it worth a darn.(my skill is probably more in doubt than my equipment) Is it easier for a beginner to cast with a 5wt or 6wt? I like the feel of the 5 wt as you feel every bump but I am not sure if I would lose some sensititvity and action if I go to a 6wt??? I was looking at Sage (forget model in $200 range) and Amundson (just around $140). I heard Sage is good but know little about Amundson....Any suggestions on a middle of the road reel would also be appreciated.
 

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I would lean towards the Sage and i think your looking at either the Launch series or the FLI series for that pricve range. myself i fish a 5wt for stillwaters (nothing heavier) and im thinking of going down to a 4 or even 3wt. I love my Sage 5wt very sensitive which is great for feeling the rod load which aids in casting ease. and why not match it with the cheap end large arbour Sage reel ($120) my dad just got one very nice. I have the same reel for my 8wt and so does he. you could go cheaper on the reel as it does really only hold the line in most cases :happy: but im a gear whore :happy: with each new thing i buy they just keep getting more pricey :confused: why is that i wonder :beerchug:
 

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Cyrus: As you have mentioned in your post, if you are new to flycasting, it's not the setup that is causing you problems...and purchasing a Sage rod will not significantly improve your cast. I've tried some of the Fenwick products before, and they cast very well for the price point they are offered. Fenwick has been in the fishing market much longer than many of the other more expensive modern brands, and they know how to build a good flyrod.

I've always felt that investing in a set of casting lessons from a good instructor is worth more to the beginner than a set of premium equipment. :2cents:
 

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Personally, and contrary to what the others have said, I fish a no-name 6wt on stillwaters. Granted, it was a gift (from WalMart) so I didn't really get a choice, but I love the feel it has. It's quite sensitive and I can feel every bottom-touch when I'm using chronies.

I'd agree with both Hook and Stone when it comes to casting. Invest in some lessons and it will pay dividends in the end. I found someone to teach me (at no cost :thumbup:) and I gained an extra 20ft in distance :happy:
 

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The first fly rod I got (a birthday gift from my wife) was a Fenwick HMX 5 wt. I have had it for 12 years and still use it. I have other rods, no Sage tho', in other weights that I use also, but I have never felt under gunned on interior lakes with my Fenwick. The reel I still use for it is a BFR 56. As long as your line is matched, the set up should be fine. Get some instruction. Are you coming out to the June 7-8 fish out at Roche, 'cause there will be a lot of folks out there with the expertise and willingness to help, I am sure.
 

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Cyrus, Like others have said, keep the rod you got. The only other than lessons is check what kind of floating line you have and what sort of shape it's in. If it's getting older and requires replacment, the SA head start line is relitively lost cost and is a great line for beginners.
 

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Another thing to keep in mind that was mentioned on another thread is using the correct line and make sure it is treated properly, and matches the wt. of the rod. You might also want to check your guides to be sure they are smooth as glass, and when you put your rod together, be sure the guides line up perfectly from reel to the tip of the rod......Ortho 8)
 

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If you're really having a hard time casting with your setup, try going up to a 6wt line on your 5wt rod. It really makes a big difference if you're having problems with your line piling up or blowing around in the wind. Yes, yes, I can hear the peanut gallery now: microfractures. Well, I've done it for years and I've never broken a rod.
 

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As I said earlier, I have this exact rod. It doesn't need to be overlined. As a matter of fact, I have overlined mine on occasion and it really doesn't handle the extra weight well at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for the advice. I think I have overweighted line (sinking) on it now......but I plan on getting some lessons. I did buy a rod anyway to back up this one just in case something happens!!!
 

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Congrats on your purchase. What did you end up getting? Also - you might not need it as a backup! I fish stillwaters with two rods - one with a floating line, the other with a sinking line. This makes it convenient to switch strategies quickly! As for casting, the rod brand is somewhat irrelevant. If it is balanced and you have the basic technique correct for the rod action, you will be able to cast just fine. Then it becomes almost like "fine tuning" your skills. I fished with an old Browning 5 wt for years with lots of success. It was an old "noodle rod" with an extremely slow action. Once I got used to the action, casting was a breeze. The ultra slow action also was beneficial when fishing chironomids with a sinking line... ;)

As for casting lessons - take them! Also, practice casting in a park (if you're not doing so already). You'll be casting well in no time! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I was gonna spend the big bucks and buy a Sage but I probably would end up breaking it......I ended up going to Wholesale Sports where they had their 1 year anniversary sale and bought an Amundson 5 wt, 4 peice. I compared it to the Temple Fork Outfitters that was about 50 dollars more and they felt just as light. Apparently they are new to the market. I got a free hard case with it and a warranty. It will likely be my second rod in case of a break or if I go with 2 lines. Very light rod and pretty good price at a $100.
 

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One thing about Sage is the lifetime warranty. When I got my Sage rods, the company was offering an "unconditional lifetime warranty". Used it once on my 5 wt VPS - got the rod back in 3 weeks minus the 50 dollar handling fee (more like a deductible). My fault for the breakage - but I don't want to discuss that here... :-[ Have fun with the new Amundson! :)
 
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