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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys and gals,
About a year ago I decided to try centerpinning and managed to find a used Trophy XL winter run for cheap; I haven't looked back since. Being a notorious gearhead, I've been contemplating the upgrade to an Islander Steelheader but have always had trouble justifying the cost... I tried out an Islander reel recently (by "tried out" i mean span it a couple of times) and this thing seemed to spin forever, whereas I have trouble getting 15 seconds of spin out of my Trophy XL. My question is, how big of a difference does this extra "spin time" make? I can see it reducing resistance on your line during a drift, and possibly adding some distance onto a cast. But honestly, aside from our desires just to own an Islander or Milner etc., how does it affect your performance on the water?

P.S. by creating this thread I'm really just seeking approval to take the plunge, so please say big difference 8)
 

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I have a winter run, I use it for those small summer hoes on the cap with an ultralight rod...I have typically used a silex for the last 20 years, and nothing else. It works on the same basic premise as the trophy. A bushing reel. They start out slow but improve with use...I recently purchased an Islander to add to the collection, and as a ball bearing reel, is not really a true "centerpin", but the spin and performance is quality. I bought it for my girlfriend, it is much easier to cast for certain.

Comparing the Winter run to the Islander.... The Islander is much more solidly built, has larger line capacity, a thinker rim for spin control, and much better spin from the get go. I would go for that hands down if you were trying to choose between the two...

If you want options check out the many other reels that are available...there is another trophy pin, in case you like the trophy stuff, it's called the "wild waters"...seems like a decent reel when I looked at it.

Hope that helps,

rib
 

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im sure some people will have different opinions but.. i think a smoother pin just makes it so much more enjoyable to fish with.
plus it makes you look ultra cool! 8)

if this says anything, i'd never trade mine(islander) and i am happy i "bucked" up for it!

-fishey
 

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You get what you pay for!
Yes the Islander is more $$$$$ But it is worth it. Much more smoother and perfect endless drifts. Hence the spinning forever thing. Keeps your presentations floating down river as natural to the current as possible. I own two Islanders and can't see me going anywhere else at the moment for a CP. Perhaps a Milner one day but I am good for now.


If you go Islander...................YOU WON'T REGRET IT!



Hotrod
 

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The length of time a reel spins is also determined by the mass of the reel. More mass = more inertial force that keeps the reel spinning. What is really important however is startup. That's basically the amount of force needed for the reel to go from dead stop to start spinning. More startup force required = less natural drift of your float because it will be held back by the reel since it can't spin freely enough. A good quality reel will have a great startup. Bearing reels out of the box tend to have better startup because there's no break in period. Bushing reels, once broken in are also amazing. Where bushing reels have an advantage, IMO, is if you get dirt inside the reel, it's easy to pop off the spool, rinse, dry and start fishing again. With bearings, you're usually fiddling with screws, and covers before you get inside. Maintenance doesn't seem to be significantly different other than removing the screws for the bearing type reels as mentioned above.
 

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Merc said:
The length of time a reel spins is also determined by the mass of the reel. More mass = more inertial force that keeps the reel spinning. What is really important however is startup. That's basically the amount of force needed for the reel to go from dead stop to start spinning. More startup force required = less natural drift of your float because it will be held back by the reel since it can't spin freely enough. A good quality reel will have a great startup. Bearing reels out of the box tend to have better startup because there's no break in period. Bushing reels, once broken in are also amazing. Where bushing reels have an advantage, IMO, is if you get dirt inside the reel, it's easy to pop off the spool, rinse, dry and start fishing again. With bearings, you're usually fiddling with screws, and covers before you get inside. Maintenance doesn't seem to be significantly different other than removing the screws for the bearing type reels as mentioned above.
Well said Merc. Better c.p.reel doesn't make you a better fisherman,is all river politics.But if you have extra money ,why not go to the best for enjoyment. :beerchug:
 

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I myself fish a Streamside ball bearing pin. I bought it from A&N the September before last and being at half the price of the Islander I wanted and still do, I justified buying this to get me started and seeing as it was on sale for$100 ;D this reel looks almost identical to the Islander and spins great ;D not sure if I will bother getting an Islander now but I have been eyeballing some Hardy's and even them pricey Talisman :happy:

my reel casts far with little effort runs smooth and drifts beautifully. Rib can vouch for this as he saw me use it when i was first starting (he was my tutor even though i didnt need much he said) thanks Rib :cheers:
 

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As Merc said it's the start-up thats' more important than spin-time.The easier the line comes of the spool,the better drift you get (won't swing into shore as quick) in the really gentle/slow current when a really natural drift is needed with roe or jigs. That being said; a slow to start up reel can be persuaded to perform better with a nudge to the spool/handle on either the cast or the drift for free. If you fish faster water/seams with action baits like blades and worms it doesn't make much difference.Maybe your used winter-run is not fully broken in? If money is tight,wait it out,and as Hook said there are other reels that are a step up yet le$$. But if you take the plunge it will be money well spent.
 

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If you want a great pin for a decent price check out the okuma aventa vt1002. Best reel for the price, I think anyways. Or wait for the new ross to hit the shelves. I hear this is one awesome reel for around the same price range. About 3 bills
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the good advice guys, I never really thought about how the startup of the reel would be more important but it definitely makes sense. I'll definitely have to do some more research before making a decision. You gotta admit fishey's right though, not only does having a cool pin make you look cool, it makes you feel cool, and therefore exude coolness :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Maybe your used winter-run is not fully broken in?
That is an interesting point. Since the winter-run was my first CP I don't have a point of reference as to the amount of effort required to break in a bushing reel. However, I had one intense day of pink fishing up in the Kitimat this year and the next time I picked up my reel I noticed that it definitely span more freely. But this was really only noticeable that one time... Do you think that this is pretty typical of breaking in a bushing reel or is it more of an iterative process?
 
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