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07/08 regulations show catch/posession limits of bass.
Is there any need to protect those alien invaders that can harm our native fish habitat?
I am really curious why they set limits for bass.
 

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No need, these fish spread like a wild fire! I cannot believe that the DFO is concerned about them....complete BS if you ask me...I know that every one of them that I catch is not going back, or coming home!

Mike <"))))))))><
 

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I DONT RELEASE BASS, exept into the bushes.

When will we have limits on atlantic salmon?

When I start a club and call it the"westcoast atlantic salmon assn."

Then we can take our buckets and put atlantics everywhere. :naughty:
 

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jetboatjim said:
I DONT RELEASE BASS, exept into the bushes.

When will we have limits on atlantic salmon?

When I start a club and call it the"westcoast atlantic salmon assn."

Then we can take our buckets and put atlantics everywhere. :naughty:
Could you imagine if fisherman ran the DFO? :beerchug:

just think jim....we're removing a predator, and giving the ground essential nutrients!

Mike <"))))))><
 

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I DONT RELEASE BASS, exept into the bushes.


All of you fisherman that think your doing the waters any good by destroying a fish just because you think they don't belong here need to give your head a shake. Bass are fish just like Steelhead and Salmon and Sturgeon. All fish! You rant and rave about protecting our resource you wine and complain about people flossing keeping snagged fish or complain about the way the natives waste the resource what do you think you are doing? Sure maybe Bass don't belong in the lower mainland but they are here to stay. They have been in most of these lakes longer than the majority of the fisherman out there 50-60 years in fact. So you should relax a little and think that we have another up and coming fishing resource right in our own back yard. They are great little scrappers and the big ones will give most salmon a run for the money as far as a great fight goes. Now go out and catch some fish. :p :2cents:
 

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yes your right ,about stocking SMALLMOUTH bass in the 40's,in some lowermainland lakes.
After they decided this wasn't a good idea, rutinone came to the rescue and killed everything off, so they could rebuild the NATIVE fishes.

so this happened on the brunette/burnaby lake watershed, no bass for 40 some odd years.

All of a sudden largemouth bass everywhere.......hmmmm........

so as I said, and have been warned by local fisheries officers, I will keep killing bass and doing my part, as I dont sit on a fence.
 

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I see what you mean but the local low lying lakes don't offer anything extremely exciting for fisherman 12 "trout that taste muddy woopee. Any of these lakes are stocked with trout. don't need to stock the bass or crappies I don't see the harm that everybody claims. Bass and trout co survive together all over the place. In fact i've caught afew trout on spinner baits while bass fishing.
jetboatjim said:
yes your right ,about stocking SMALLMOUTH bass in the 40's,in some lowermainland lakes.
After they decided this wasn't a good idea, rutinone came to the rescue and killed everything off, so they could rebuild the NATIVE fishes.

so this happened on the brunette/burnaby lake watershed, no bass for 40 some odd years.

All of a sudden largemouth bass everywhere.......hmmmm........

so as I said, and have been warned by local fisheries officers, I will keep killing bass and doing my part, as I dont sit on a fence.
 

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Keep it moderately well behaved boys...uncover the facts, pursue the discussion and civil argument, but keep it just that...civil.

So far so good, mainly... :wallbash: Just don't degrade to name calling... ;)

Thanks.
 

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Jetboatjim,

If you're from the lower mainland, you probably don't know how to catch bass anyway. So I don't think that the Bass have anything to worry about. You can just keep throwing the couple of Bass a year that you catch in the bushes if that's what makes you feel good. Like fishn30 said the Bass are here to stay. And the DFO realize this too. So they're going to start to protect these fish. I hope the DFO catches up with you while you're pitching your Bass into the bushes. Then you'll get what you deserve. You can't call yourself an ethical fisherman if you do something like that to any gamefish. Grow up and start acting like a civilized human being, not a angry fish tossing maniac :happy:. You won't get any respect on this site with posts like that one buddy. Atleast not from the real fishermen anyway.

Tight Lines
 

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Well, all you hardcore steelie guys will be ranting about bass soon enough....once they run out of bull, cutthroat, and resident rainbow smolts...guess what they're going for next? STEELHEAD SMOLTS! yes I know they are pretty much rainbow smolts....

I for one know how to catch BASS reely well...as I've fished for them in ONTARIO quite a bit when we would go visit reliatives pretty fun on a little 6 foot spinning rod with 4lb test..my biggest was 24 inches...sure I probably will be one of the first HARDCORE BASS FISHERMAN of my generation...but I don't think the illegal plantation of these fish is good at the current moment in the LM..my opinion....we're just trying to get our stocks back up anyways....just think the PITT & STAVE rivers have Bass in them...pretty soon the FRASER, HARRISON, & VEDDER will...than the SKAGIT!!!!! and oh, you can only kill 4 per day :pissed:...the population increases rapidly! the trout population deminishes!

BTW: I'd rather catch a nice 12" chrome wormy trout that tastes like mud over a 12" black and green slimy BASS that tastes like GARBAGE anyday!

Mike <")))))))))><
 

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I'd rather eat trout too Mike. But I'm not talking about eating fish. The majority of people here think that the Bass are going to spread like wild fire. This is only sceptisism. Nobody knows for sure that this will happen. So until it does I think people should just lay-off the bass hating and focus on the native fish stocks that we all cherish here in B.C.. This attitude towards Bass is a form of prejudice, that wouldn't fly if we were relating to human beings. :naughty: Don't you think :confused:
 

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Well the Bass are spreading through the Fraser now, the lower stave is completely stacked with them, and the lower Pitt is too. They are showing up in alot of feeder systems to the Faser also. I would not say that they have been in thse areas for 50-60 years, and once they keep moving through they will keep killing off native fish. I'm for removing the limit through the Fraser valley and alot of other areas on the province also. What I can't figure out is why you can keep and kill cutties in the lower mainland. Now that justy doesn't make sense. Maybe someone let a good 'ol boy from down south into The fisheries department :confused:
 

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I found this on the Mennonite Historical Society's website it mentions if you read down about bass being caught in Sturgeon Slough back in the 1930's.

Fisheries did an analysis of the largemouth population by Pitt Lake they were invited to talk about the issue on Bill Good's radio show last year and they stated that the bass population has been there 50 plus years.




The Way We Were: Pitt Meadows and Rannies Ranch
by Helen Rose Pauls

In 1930, the Jacob and Anna Peters family reached Agassiz on the train from the prairies, hoping to settle here, but were unable to cross the Fraser River by ferry because it was frozen over. Chancey Eckert, who was the main facilitator of the Yarrow settlement, encouraged them to continue on the train to Pitt Meadows, where a few Mennonite families already lived. They decided to go westward and bought ten acres in the present townsite of Pitt Meadows where Abraham and Margeret Wiens as well as the John Martens family already lived.

The men and older boys of these families found work in the Hammond Sawmill, and in the local peat bog and factory. Some of the young women found positions in Vancouver as domestics and began to send much needed money home. Their acreages soon became hayfields and kitchen gardens.

At first, church services were held in the Peters' basement where a few families from Haney joined the Pitt Meadows group. Together with Christian families of other denominations, they erected a little church, which served as a school building as well, behind the general store.

In the mid thirties, the Mennonite Board of Colonization made arrangements for settlers to purchase pieces of a huge acreage on what is now Pitt Polder, from a millionaire named Mr. Rannie. This land was reclaimed lake bottom, protected by *****. The board, under the leadership of a Mr. Sawatsky, who also purchased land there, encouraged depression weary Mennonite farmers from the prairies to make down payments on these acreages. At least forty families with money were expected to settle there, but instead, ten without money arrived. The settlement, called Rannies Ranch, soon became known as Rainy Ranch.

The Rannie Ranch settlers attempted to develop an infrastructure, and a tiny store served them. Church services were held in various homes, and the Pitt Meadows Mennonites decided to join their group for services. A small school was established in a converted chicken barn. Abe Pankratz remembers the teacher, Mr. McRae and how he longed to taste his teacher's "store-bought white bread" sandwiches. He also remembers playing on log booms with the other boys and fishing for bass and bullheads in the Sturgeon Slough, a man-made canal nearby.

While they tried to establish a viable community, they also worked very hard to build up small dairy farms. Marie Peters Balzer remembers that her family purchased forty acres at Rannies Ranch as well, but they remained in their house near the Pitt Meadows townsite, traveling to the larger farm to look after the hay fields.

Apparently, many Japanese families farmed in the Pitt Meadows area as well, and Marie remembers that more than half the children in the Pitt Meadows school and about 80% of the children in the Hammond School were Japanese. Sometimes the Baptist pastor would give Marie and her sister a ride in his motorcycle sidecar to evening service at the Baptist Church, where many Japanese families attended. During the war, when the Japanese were disenfranchised and sent east to internment camps, some Mennonites rented their lands from the government. Marie recalls that her father bought a tractor from a Japanese farmer, and although he was supposed to pay the authorities, he managed to deal with the farmer directly.

When all of the Japanese farmers disappeared during the war, it was a sad time for the whole region, as many of the Mennonites had become good friends with them. Marie's father rented some of their land for strawberries and raspberries during this time, thinking that he was taking care of it until they returned. Little did he know the full story of their fate.

Unfortunately, it was soon apparent that the Rannies Ranch settlement could not continue. The land was too low, and the settlers did not have the resources to maintain roads or drainage systems. The soil was found to be extremely poor and swampy. "They couldn't make a go of it," says Marie, "and so they dispersed to other settlements, many to Mission or Vancouver. The whole community was dissolved." These hard working pioneers lost not only their land, which reverted back to Mr. Rannie, but also their last dollars which had been used for down payments. They moved to other communities, and found work wherever they could, often in sawmills or peat bogs, so that they could earn some ready cash to survive.

In the sixties, farmers from Holland drained the area for dairy farms and renamed it Pitt Polder. Recently, a prestigious golf course has been developed on Rannie Road called Swanieset Bay Resort and Country Club.

When I asked a former resident whether she had photos about anything depicting Rannies Ranch, she replied, "Photos? No, I don't think anyone had photographs. We were all too poor for pictures."

It sounds as if many more stories could be told about Pitt Meadows and Rannies Ranch, and we would enjoy hearing and sharing them. If anyone was a part of this settlement, or has stories about any other aspect of our history as Mennonites in B.C., please contact the archives or send a message to [email protected]. ¤
 

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I have caught a few bass in the lower mainland before and I can tell you with no doubt in my mind that they did not and will not compare in fighting ability to our local salmon species. Just because bass may have been around since the 30's or 40's it still doesn't make it justified to protect them in the regs. I am a preservation and catch and release guy but I don't think that bass belong in our local waters. Not paying attention to the problem now is just ignorance. Lets face it our salmon populations have enough trouble as is...what we don't need is a non native species causing havoc as well. If you don't think that bass will affect the native species of the lower mainland please go and search the internet for the countless times that introduced non native FISH species have decimated local fish populations.
 

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Good points Srethy,

I think it's safe to say that bass are not the sole or even significant cause for the fact that Salmon populations are in trouble - instead of blaming bass (which is easy to do) we need to have a better look at the regulations, shoreline and river development projects, and address the attitude of "entitlement" in regards to the catch and keep mentality surrounding the salmon fishery which is ultimately the cause for its decline. Bass is a non-native species to all parts of the word except the Deep South of the US and fisheries all across North America and abroad have been preserved and are maintained very well despite their presence.
 

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I know of a few good bass spots and would love to go back next time to catch nothing but bows or dollies. IMO all of the Bass that are aound can die and I wouldn't think twice about it, as long as it wasn't a fish disease that affects our native fish too. Bass love to feed on smolts, small fish etc. So they do make an impact on our native fish in BC. If they weren't around the smolts would have a better chance of survival and more to feed to the local bull/Dollies in the area.

Bass are ugly and I don't consider them a sport fish, though I would be slammed for that statement in most places in North America but its how I feel. I think bass should be regarded the same as a Pike Minnow.
 

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cblake said:
It's sad but it's thinking like that which has got our fishery to the point where it is now.
I do what I can to help our native fisheries. But why protect a non-native fish? It makes no sense to me, especially because they have an impact on our Native fish stocks.
 
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