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Fisheries is taking steps to rotenone lakes in the Shuswap Region this year due to perch and bass being introduced they are concerned about them gaining access to Shuswap Lake and the Adams River system. I think to a lot of people this step makes a lot of sense.

I read however that Fisheries is now allowing an experimental re-introduction of sockeye salmon to Skaha Lake. To do this they have to open fish ladders at McIntrye Dam at the south end of Vaseaux Lake and the Okangan Falls Dam at Skaha Lake. At present there are no perch or largemouth in Skaha Lake however they are both in Vaseaux lake just south of Skaha Lake. Opening the fish ladders from Vaseaux to Skaha Lake will allow perch and largemouth access to the rest of the Okanagan basin.

You have Fisheries spending mega $$$$ to rotenone lakes in one region and then they are welcoming bass and perch into another.

Hey makes sense to me.

All we hear from them is how detrimental bass and perch are so why the switch?
 

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The rotenone thing is old news I wrote about it in my newspaper column two months ago. Not a thing was said, pro or con. It will cause some sreaming if the rotenone transforms into rolenlonen and starts causing people to get altimers.
 

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newsman said:
It will cause some sreaming if the rotenone transforms into rolenlonen and starts causing people to get altimers.
Do you mean Alzhimers. If so, I don't think there is yet any confirmed cause of Alzhimers, which is why preventing/curing it is not yet a possibility.
 

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MoE has lots of double standards,
just a quick few
Coquihalla.... closed in the past until run size reaches 600+ steelhead
Mamquam river.....has less than 100 most years never has a closed season, same on the Ashlu
Was willing to plant Mamquam with hatchery fish when the CN spill happened on Cheakamus, now there's not a chance becuase there is still a few wild steelhead left. They were willing to give it up until they lost the Cheakamus battle on doing hatchery fish for a couple of years. Search around and you will find that each region is run on it's own without answering to a central head office and policies change from region to region. Thompson river is managed like no other river scratch the Coq on closing it until they feel there is enough steelhead in the river to allow fishing. Just think if they did that on all BC steelhead streams. Opening day gold rushes all over the place.
 
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