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Discussion Starter #1
Often when fishing on the Cowichan River for Browns with the emerger in early June I have been fooled by these creatures. You see they were planted there in the 1930's and coming from Germany in that time period they tend to think that they are smarter than any other fish.

What these fish have a habit of doing is coming to the angler like they were a small fish. Having seen much action early in life, they know there is some enemy on the other end of the line. So being better educated than Steelhead, Cutthrouts and the other native species that usually move in and out of the river they have developed advanced anti tippet weaponry and tactics.

As soon as the fish is close to you it will stop like a private does when his Leutnant blows a whistle or yells ANHALTEN!

Chances are the unwary and unschooled green recruit angler will think "boy are these Browns every stupid" and proceed to try to either net the fish or put torque to the line to bring it to the bank.

That will be the novice fly-fisherman's first and last mistake as a big Brown will turn and casually pop 4-6 lb tippet with their sharp teeth OR if you have used 8 lb tippet spool you or go and sulk on the other side of the river especially with a 3 or 4 weight fly rod. OR the really smart fish will pop your tippet on the first available big sharp nugget. The bigger fish are far too well educated to jump and have been taught this at a very early age, only a Brown less than about 14 inches in length will ever jump on the Cowichan.

The smaller browns that are less than 5 lbs but more than about 18 inches in length can do all the same things as the really big ones can. These 1930's Browns are schooled in the art of the fishing war at a very young age.

As far as the anglers that catch them on coffee grinders with flash and dazzle wiggler do dads "some even with sticky sharp treble hooks" go, at least this distasteful form of angling has kept the population of Browns in check to some extent.

The dumber Browns on the lower river do tend to fall for wiggle baits with scent now that the once astounding Coho, Steelhead, Cutthroat, Chum an other native fry population has plummeted.:2cents:
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
You are giving these species too much credit. They don't have cognitive thinking skills.
I am extremely sorry I did not realize that humor was not allowed in this sub forum. I am sure that there are those who have landed huge German Browns with even 4 lb tippet on a 3 weight, but in my experience all this does is improve their dental health with a good floss..LOL

And seriously they have the instinct in them to use rocks and logs for a long line release. In the bridge pool about 15 years ago three or four of them in a row took me right down to the bottom on a 6 weight and proceeded to wrap the tippet around a sharp rock using a muddler I only landed one fish over 5 lbs that day. The only solution is to give them slack line and hope that the barb less hook holds!

Correction alert on the fourth fish I figured out how to deal with the loss of muddlers!

One thing they are somewhat smarter than I am sometimes. ROLF
 

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Entertaining post.
So many factors have determined some Rivers fate and/or future.
And the futures of others.
History has stocked lakes and streams for food and sport (damn europeans) the results can be debated.
There is a little more to it than just the stocking.
What about the bass, all the trout in many of the interior lakes, Steelhead, coho, chinook in the great lakes?
If the Cowichan is your fight Go for it!
But be mindful of those that fish it for what is now.
I could despair on a number of rivers in the lower mainland some of which are being restored due to passions such as yours.

If you're fighting for something Go for it!
AND keep us posted.
Whining because things have changed.......
Everyone remembers the good old days and/or know someone who has.

If we could get rid of people (except me) fishing would be MOST AWSOME
:cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Entertaining post.
So many factors have determined some Rivers fate and/or future.
And the futures of others.
History has stocked lakes and streams for food and sport (damn europeans) the results can be debated.
There is a little more to it than just the stocking.
What about the bass, all the trout in many of the interior lakes, Steelhead, coho, chinook in the great lakes?
If the Cowichan is your fight Go for it!
But be mindful of those that fish it for what is now.
I could despair on a number of rivers in the lower mainland some of which are being restored due to passions such as yours.

If you're fighting for something Go for it!
AND keep us posted.
Whining because things have changed.......
Everyone remembers the good old days and/or know someone who has.

If we could get rid of people (except me) fishing would be MOST AWSOME
:cheers:
I am indeed not at all fighting for anything, I freely admit my passion for fishing for Brown Trout as well as other "planted" fish. Long ago I learned that there was little to be effectively done so I have surrendered to the inevitable.

But on the bright side the returns of decent numbers of winter fish to the Cowichan has now given me hope. As the enhancement stocking of Steelhead is now on hold on this river I am very optimistic as some of these fish are definitely wild fish.

But this is a thread about fishing for Browns on the Cowichan. I sincerely hope that my experience with this river is of some little help to those who would respect it and the fish within it.

As the stream drops below 60 cubic meters per second at the meter close to the outlet on in Lake Cowichan, hopefully soon, there should be excellent muddler fishing with a small gold rolled NO BEAD HEAD. Even on a floating line with a decent understanding of how and where to present the fly the results can be spectacular if you do not over wade or splash around flogging the water with your line.

Spey casting and flogging at it with big sticks from distances will usually just put the fish down for everybody else, especially when the water is gin clear. Rather like great summer run Steelheading in olden times. Only a fool would not approach the water with stealth and fish tight before even considering putting a foot in the water!:cheers::2cents:
 
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