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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured it was time for something a bit different when it comes to steelhead threads.

A disscussion on how, where, when and what to do once you have latched on to " MR BIG".

MR BIG would be fish of at least 15+ pounds (locally this would make more sense as + 20's are very rare in these parts these days.

I have found most my larger fish in the LM to be found in deep 6-12 foot broken water or swirly water and often this water is quite quick in appearance, but in reality there is a slower moving current at the bottom and this is the real draw for the biggies.
I have also encountered some large fish in long flats in 3 feet of water, but I am certain these were moving fish as we encountered good numbers of fish on these days, almost always in a short time span.

Truth be told I lose as many of the biggies as I land, due mostly to the large steelheads choice of holding lies.
Seems these spots are usually close to some obstruction where these fish bolt immediately. I have broken a few off on unstoppable cartwheel shows and simpy have had hooks pop out, probably from the hook pulling through the flesh, IMO.

I prefer jigs in these locations as I find the weighted head allows me to be IN the zone at all times, especially due to the swirling boily nature of such spots. I grew tired of watching my pink worm flail around above my terminal gear in these spots and have used the jig head to combat this.

I really find the Pink worm to be a BIG FISH attractor, I fish them on the tips of my jigs often and do excellent with this technique. Been fishing worms for a long time and many of my big fish have come on them.

On the topic of landing LARGE steelhead, one of my best techniques to save the day with biggies is placing my rod underwater and low and to the side, I have turned numerous large fish with this technique as they were bolting for the run below and certain freedom. If you find yourself in this predicament try stuffing your rod underwater and too the side (upstream) and slightly clamp down on the fish, some will turn and then smoothly and slowly reel in as the fish moves upstream. Some just bust ya up and thats the beauty of BIGGIES :thumbup:, they all leave me shaken, landed or lost.
 

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that must suck alot losing them big ones. I guess im lucky then cause I always lose the smaller guys (12lbish range) and seem to get in the over 15lb guys easier OK not easier btu they dont pop off as easy cause they BIG :eek: I have hit some big ones in less than three feet of water in behind shallow shelves. had one spot last year produced everytime the water was around the same height GREAT SPOT!!! my dad hit one in the same spot right after i bonked my hatchery that was easily pushing 25lbs :eek: :eek: :eek: I couldnt believe it and it took me both hands to hold the tail ;D then he kicked and zoom took off with my dads rod going into the drink :happy: but i grabbed the rod and the fish popped the hook at the same time. we were pretty sure he hooked the same fish the next weekend again just a bit up river from that spot and lost it right at shore this time :happy: He has bad luck with losing them at shore, we dont know why :beerchug:


HOOK
 

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3 years ago I was lucky enought to give an angler a hand to tail his fish, and wouldnt you know I could barely get my hand half way around its tail....It was a good 20 pound wild! I rarely see a fish bigger then 15 pounds on that river.
 

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Good point about how you like to turn big fish Bent rod...this is something many anglers tend to overlook...I don't know how many times I have stood there and watched as an angler just stands there holding on for dear life...LoL...

There are many ways to fight a fish, and little tips like the one you gave in your original post are the kind of tips a lot of anglers could benefit from...

One tip I'll add though, if any angler here wants to use the tip bent rod mentioned, be sure to check what is behind you when changing the angle from which you apply pressure. If the leader or hook give out, you're rod tip might come flying back into rocks or trees and you'll be left with more disappointment than just a nice fish lost... ;)

A very effective way to turn fish, that's for sure... :thumbup:

rib
 

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Definitly a great method to turn a fish in any type of fishing, one thing I noticed in my adventures is if I have to do this too many times, the hook can get quite loose in its hole (ie a hook falling out as soon as the pressure is release in a hard area in a fish like the upper jaw, nose area) The hook twists more doing this so it is something to think about towards the end of the fight, that the hook may not be as well set as it was at the start! But definitly the best way to turn a freight train!
 

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Hold your rod sideways to the downstream side if you can. The more pressure you apply the harder it is for the fish to open its gillplate and breath which means it will run less and come in much quicker so it can get more oxygen
 

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Try flipping the rod over from one side of your body to the other when a fish is acting up...I find this works really well also when playing stubborn fish...I think the quick change in the angle from which pressure is being applied, keeps the fish off balance...

You have to be brave to fight a steelhead like this, and definitely assertive. If someone is reading this and hasn't caught their first yet, or even their second, don't be tentative when applying this technique...you may want to wait to employ it when you are no longer worried about losing a fish...
 

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I agree fully with that ribwart said. I believe that by changing the angle of the rod, the fish has to kick it's tail to change it's angle. Each time it moves it's tail, it brings itself closer to you.
 

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ribwart said:
Try flipping the rod over from one side of your body to the other when a fish is acting up...I find this works really well also when playing stubborn fish...I think the quick change in the angle from which pressure is being applied, keeps the fish off balance...

You have to be brave to fight a steelhead like this, and definitely assertive. If someone is reading this and hasn't caught their first yet, or even their second, don't be tentative when applying this technique...you may want to wait to employ it when you are no longer worried about losing a fish...
You may want to try this on a Thompson steelie! b :p :p


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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I consider any fish around 15 and up to be BIG AZZ for these parts, fall fish excluded of course ;).

We had one that we brooded last year that was longer than the holding tank, which is 39"(had to place it corner to corner), probably close to 18 pounds. Biggest fish I touched last year on the local winter scene.

Had one straighten out a Matzou 3/0 60 degree sickle jig hook I was testing on the Vedder last April, that one was scary big, hope he got busy with the ladies :thumbup:.

With a 15 already weighed in this week(not me :'(), perhaps we will see a big fish year, seen it before.
 
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