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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone advise me on the USA emissions requirement for outboat engines;

Are the American Outboard owners being pressured into getting rid of their used outboard engines for new ones ????

Is there an opportunity for us Canadian Outboard owners to buy good outboard engines in USA due to above ????

Let me know if you have heard about this ???

Thanks
Cape R
 

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Cape:

Engines have to meet CARB and CAFE standards and these are based on levels set by California. All four-stroke engines meet these standards individually and some two-strokes collectively but not necessarily individually. It’s a weird rating system yet it gets some two-strokes (e-tech) in the area which four-strokes reside.

However, many areas, particularly where the water is for potable use, two-strokes are banned. In Washington state and in growing areas in BC, two strokes cannot be used. Sure, you could get a deal on a two stroke but in certain lakes they’re verboten.

The other factor in buying from the States be it two or four stroke is warranty. Canadian dealers won’t recognize that warranty. Yup, you can save a bit buying in the States but for warranty service you’re going to have to take it back to the US dealer for warranty service. Sometimes the ‘savings’ on a US purchase isn’t worth the hassle.

Not to put too fine a point on it but if you’re buying an engine that doesn’t meet the standards to which Canada also recognizes you’re restricting use. That bargain motor may not be a bargain.

MichaelR, Brigantine Marine
 

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well said Michael, but I would like to clarify a couple things. The first is the ban on two strokes on some lakes; it is not the two stroke engine that is banned it is the non 3 star CARB rated engines that are banned, which are all the traditional two strokes and even some 4 strokes that don't meet or were never tested for a CARB rating. The next is that canadian dealers don't warranty US engines because the canadian version of the brand manufacturer doesn't pay us warranty on the US engines so we cannot do the warranty, it is not a decision the dealer got to make :cheers: I do have a question though...where in BC are two strokes banned...I haven't heard of this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the great responses !

The only reason I was asking about the above is I am dealing on a boat with an older engine (1993), I am of the opinion that eventhough the representation of the engine is "its great" (by a reputable USA dealership) that the engine will probable only last one season but maybe the
incentive for the sale of the boat was the engine emission issue.

Again thanks and the only one I would buy a new engine or used engine if from a CANADIAN DEALERSHIP, because my experience to date with CANADIAN DEALERSHIPS has been EXCELLENT ,

THANKS AGAIN GUYS
Cape R
 

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Cascademarine:

You’re right, I should have been more specific: some two-strokes are admissible if they meet the new CARB standards. Also you’re right on dealer warranties being restricted by the engine makers. We, as a Suzuki dealer, won’t get warranty assistance – I think that’s universal no matter the maker here in Canada -- on US purchased engines. As I said, I should have been clearer.

Best,

MichaelR
 

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Cape:

The fully skinny on this boat/engine purchase. I don’t know the size of the boat or the engine yet that makes little difference: you’re buying an engine that’s 15 years old and close to the end of its useful life. On average (there are exceptions) a two-stroke engine is good for about 1500 hours before major parts replacement and this not only can be expensive but there may not be parts available for it. Some dealer won’t work on engines that are of a certain age because of parts unavailability.

And, frankly, it’s worth nothing on a trade-in and few dealers are taking older two-strokes at all since there’s little or no market for them. There are some older four-stokes but not that many and that’s because they last much longer than two-strokes – some of the fishing camps run their engines 6,000+ hours. On average a boat in private hands runs about 100 hours a season so buying a four-stroke can be the first and last engine purchase.

Ripping out a older two-stroke means everything must be replaced: control box, cables and instruments. Not always are those included in the engine price – they’re extra. As is all the rigging time needed. I think you should factor this in if you’re planning to keep that hull for several years.

Can you get a season out of that engine? Probably but first I would take it to a good marine service company and get a complete examination of the engine (compression test of all cylinders, spark voltage, etc.). It’s well worth the money.

So if you do buy this boat make sure the hull is sound since the engine, shortly, will be a write-off. I am a strong believer in investing in a hull survey by a professional so get that done. Trust me on this.

MichaelR
 
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