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Hey Guys!

I've been reading a lot of articles around the web about what type of line is best to fish with for stream run Salmon (particularly Coho).

Some people seem to swear by using 10-12 lb mono on their spinning reels (medium action) while others fight equally as hard for using 50 lb braid with a mono leader (or even no leader at all!).

Until recently these were really the only two options I had used; however, I recently bought a 10lb test fluoro line by Berkley for fly leader material. It wasn't until now that I realized that it is intended to be used as a mainline!

So, this brings up the question: would this work for Coho, or should I beef up the lb-test a bit? Also, what are the drawbacks to using a full fluoro line as opposed to the other options (I know from experience that it is terrible with birds nests and wind knots)?

Thanks!
 

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What about Nanofil as well??
The line is made from Dyneema (gel-spun polyethylene) fibers.
It's not braid, mono-filament or fluorocarbon.
Fibers are molecularly linked and shaped into a unified filament. ( so the manufacturer says.)
 

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Hey Guys!

I've been reading a lot of articles around the web about what type of line is best to fish with for stream run Salmon (particularly Coho).

Some people seem to swear by using 10-12 lb mono on their spinning reels (medium action) while others fight equally as hard for using 50 lb braid with a mono leader (or even no leader at all!).

Until recently these were really the only two options I had used; however, I recently bought a 10lb test fluoro line by Berkley for fly leader material. It wasn't until now that I realized that it is intended to be used as a mainline!

So, this brings up the question: would this work for Coho, or should I beef up the lb-test a bit? Also, what are the drawbacks to using a full fluoro line as opposed to the other options (I know from experience that it is terrible with birds nests and wind knots)?

Thanks!
They all work well. It comes down to personal preference. I have read vigorously on the subject.

I got some good 10lb braided around a month ago and have been really happy with it so far. It's sufix 832 brand braided in white, 4 lb diameter 10lb test. I got it for 2 things, casting distance, and the non stretch in the line which enables the ability to more easily detect bites in the line. It does what it should and does it well.. no wind knots yet and it's been heavily used now :).

That being said, I wouldn't be caught dead with this light braided anywhere near coho - not that it wouldn't work, but in my experience the coho around here are so finicky that you probably have a better shot with mono/flouro.

I haven't run flouro as a mainline yet because i enjoy mono in the rivers as it is quite forgiving, plus I always use a leader, usually flouro.


My suggestion would be to run 8lb mono for casting distance when needed, finess, and then throw some flouro leader on. Best of both worlds that way as I hear that casting flouro mainline isn't as nice due to the very high memory it has.

For coho I would use mono main line (8-10lb is my preference for coho, and this early on the coho are smaller, you could get away with 6lb mainline if you wanted, I run 8lb mono mainline).

Tie a nice long flouro leader and use that. You can even look into learning a knot to knot system and attach a good 10 feet of flouro to your mono.. depends how crazy about stealth you want to be. People talk about flouro being better because it blends in with water to camoflauge, unlike mono and braided. I can't say for sure if it's because of the flouro or not, but It definitely isn't decreasing my numbers :p

For your fly it would depend where you are fishing but early pressured coho I would throw 6ft + 6-10lb flouro leader, spit on the knots to lube the line and slowly pull the knot, or your knots will fail.
 

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Hey Guys!


I've been reading a lot of articles around the web about what type of line is best to fish with for stream run Salmon (particularly Coho).


Some people seem to swear by using 10-12 lb mono on their spinning reels (medium action) while others fight equally as hard for using 50 lb braid with a mono leader (or even no leader at all!).
Since you specifically mention spinning reels and coho I assume you are intending to use spoons/spinners and maybe twitching jigs? If so then I would personally choose 15-20lb test braid for the castability and no-stretch properties and add a few feet of 6-10lb test mono or fluoro leader. No need to go as heavy as 50lb braid, as I cant see any benefit in that unless you are planning on bottom bouncing for springs.

If fishing very clear water over spooky fish then an argument might be made for having a less visible mainline but I have not found that to be the case in my personal experience. Spoons/spinners/jigs also target the more aggressive fish which are less mainline-shy IMHO.

Nothing wrong with using fluorocarbon as mainline but I dont think it would have much benefit over mono for this particular application. The only downside I can see with fluoro mainline is it's deformation. Some claim that fluoro doesnt stretch or stretches much less than mono but I dont believe that's quite accurate. Fluoro does stretch but is not as elastic as mono so tends to stay stretched and thus has compromised its breaking strength. Not a big a deal with a leader which gets changed from time to time, but mainline tends not to get changed out nor cut back too often. Overall though I wouldnt sweat it. If you've already bought it, try it out and see if you like it. 10lb for mainline is a great choice IMHO.

The 'invisibility' of fluoro is probably greatly overstated by manufacturers and over the years I've become convinced that it's mostly marketing BS but that's an argument for another time. However I often do use fluoro as leader material as it generally performs no worse than mono and in the grand scheme of things its really not that expensive for some possible marginal benefit.
 

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Braid is great for covering distance, but do use a 6ft bumper of mono or flouro_On my spoon rod i run 10lb braid with a 12 lb maxima ug (mono) bumper. When snagged on a log braid is a pia to get free. the mono breaks easier than the braid even though its heavier. i went 2/3 on big native steel a week ago with this exact set up and it held with no problem as an example. One of the steel even wrapped me up in some logs then got freed up after it changed direction, still landed it. It was about a 15lber, fought like hell too. Dont be afraid to run a braid mainline for coho too. I slay coho with braid.

If im twitching jigs though, i definately prefer mono mainline. 12lb maxima ug. Braid floats and causes the jig to sink slower and is harder to keep it on the bottom where it needs to be. I typically jig near loggy structure and need the strongest durable line i can get away with so flouro is no good in this application imo. You want to be able to horse coho out away from structure if need be. Maxima ug seems to fit this situation perfectly.
I dont find myself using flouro except as tippet when fly fishing. Which i use in lakes, or for src.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Aaron Wilde:

Thank You very much for your detailed reply, I really appreciate your knowledge and will be trying the mono main with a fluoro leader.


DanL:

I just had 50 lb braid lying around from an old coho trip; however, your answer clears up the confusion there. As far as a 10 lb main, that's exactly what I thought (I will be fishing some creeks in Haida Gwaii at the end of July!!!!!)

JohnEB:

Wow, sounds like a great experience with the steel, definitely one that every person who fishes wants to have. :) Thanks for your great advice!
 

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I tried flurocarbon leder lines for coho years back, i found the knot strength to be lacking. A friend told me to use heavier line seaguars. Never switched back. Ive straightened out hooks before breaking 15lb seaguars blue label. But its not advisable to use for mainline. Any little nick or bend will weaken the material. I use chameleon line for mainline.
 

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Thought I'd throw in my limited experience testing.... long story short, for coho in the Fraser AND at Ambleside (fall fishery), I use braided 8lb either 832 or spiderwire - either has been good to me. I know the water where I fish (Langley area) and where most of the snaggy areas are (and avoid them) so, hang-ups are not really an issue in this posting..... I tie the braid directly to a snap swivel and use my spinners or spoons. No leader, nothing fancy. Since the fish are not particularly spooky in the muddy Fraser or active tidal water, I do as well or better often as any other fishermen around me. I have never lost a fish due to a break in line, don't have issues with wind knots (side note - braid can be very knotty at the spool when over-spooled! Don't give up, seems all reels have different preferences, I just cut out the mess until the nests stop and I've found the sweet spot loading of the reel). I normally cast with a 2500 or 4000 reel with this setup and a 7' 6" med light rod (believe it or not, my fav rod so far cost $30 for this fishery!). FYI - same set-up for pinks with small buzz bombs. Casting distance outcasts people around me (maybe why often I do a bit better than those around me?)

Other conditions may change the way I do things and/or gear up, but I have fished that fishery for the last 5-6 years with that setup and worked well for me!

EDIT - I DO also bring a spare spool loaded with 10lb braid (it lives in my car) and when going to other places might change up to a 4000 with 10lb briad, if things get snaggy or required a heavier hand, it's a quick change....
 

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Thought I'd throw in my limited experience testing.... long story short, for coho in the Fraser AND at Ambleside (fall fishery), I use braided 8lb either 832 or spiderwire - either has been good to me. I know the water where I fish (Langley area) and where most of the snaggy areas are (and avoid them) so, hang-ups are not really an issue in this posting..... I tie the braid directly to a snap swivel and use my spinners or spoons. No leader, nothing fancy. Since the fish are not particularly spooky in the muddy Fraser or active tidal water, I do as well or better often as any other fishermen around me. I have never lost a fish due to a break in line, don't have issues with wind knots (side note - braid can be very knotty at the spool when over-spooled! Don't give up, seems all reels have different preferences, I just cut out the mess until the nests stop and I've found the sweet spot loading of the reel). I normally cast with a 2500 or 3000 reel with this setup and a 9' med light rod (believe it or not, my fav rod so far cost $30 for this fishery!). FYI - same set-up for pinks with small buzz bombs. Casting distance outcasts people around me (maybe why often I do a bit better than those around me?)

Other conditions may change the way I do things and/or gear up, but I have fished that fishery for the last 5-6 years with that setup and worked well for me!

EDIT - I DO also bring a spare spool loaded with 10lb braid (it lives in my car) and when going to other places might change up to a 4000 with 10lb briad, if things get snaggy or required a heavier hand, it's a quick change....
What is this favorite rod of yours? I've been looking for a good medium-light weight spinning rod for coho.
 

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What is this favorite rod of yours? I've been looking for a good medium-light weight spinning rod for coho.

I'm not at home but it's a (don't laugh TOO loud - got it for a day of fishing cause it was cheap, when I was outta town but ended up loving it) EAGLE CLAW Featherlight! 7' 6" - $25 from US Cabelas http://www.cabelas.com/product/Eagle-Claw-Featherlight-Spinning-Rods/739708.uts I now it's available other places too, just did a quick search - I actually got it from a run down little roadside bait/grocery store like on the way type place in California on a spur of the moment afternoon fishing trip....

Good action, pretty sensitive on the bite, great casting, light weight, Cheap if I break it (but have put it through paces fresh and salt and it's a tough one)..... at 7' 6" it has the length to cast well, but not get hung up in the trees on the bank when fishing where you can't or don't want to wade too deep.... It's avail in 9 foot too (same price) but think i'll stick with my 7'6" until I bust or lose it at least LOL

EDIT - I have a Penn Fierce 2500 on it and have used the 4000 on it (it's a tad large for the rod tho).
 

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dont want to start a new thread so thought id ask it here.

Ive used maxima ultragreen for years fishing chinook in the rivers. Its been good but with all the floats I've tried it always starts to fray the line from sliding up and down after a few hours of fishing. Started making my own floats and it works a bit better but still ends up frayed.

Havnt used flourocarbon before, but will it get frayed like the mono does? is it worth switching over?
 

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dont want to start a new thread so thought id ask it here.

Ive used maxima ultragreen for years fishing chinook in the rivers. Its been good but with all the floats I've tried it always starts to fray the line from sliding up and down after a few hours of fishing. Started making my own floats and it works a bit better but still ends up frayed.

Havnt used flourocarbon before, but will it get frayed like the mono does? is it worth switching over?
I assume you are using a "wrap-around" foam float? Have you tried using a sliding float like a DNE with a rubber stopper? If you don't want it to slide up and down, you can put a stopper below the float as well. I use this with Maxima and don't have any fraying problems.
 

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Fraying after a few hours?

What kind of float are/were you using?

I trim my mainline back 10 or so feet every 10 or so trips (depending on the conditions; like rocks and snags where it gets dragged over and the like)
But that's the cost of doing business.

Some times you have to trim the tops and bottoms of some floats as they are a little rough sometimes.

I don't think it's the line.

:2cents:
 

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no I have been using a slip float, usually fishing about 15-20 feet deep with a couple ounces, tops of the floats always end up splitting after a while. The ones I homemade work a bit better, gonna try and make some better ones this year, just need to find some better tubing i guess, and maybe use 25-30 lb. ive been using 20lb that past few years

thanks for the input :)
 

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no I have been using a slip float, usually fishing about 15-20 feet deep with a couple ounces, tops of the floats always end up splitting after a while. The ones I homemade work a bit better, gonna try and make some better ones this year, just need to find some better tubing i guess, and maybe use 25-30 lb. ive been using 20lb that past few years

thanks for the input :)
Wow! That's deep! I have no idea where you are fishing, but I haven't ever float-fished anything that deep - or with that much weight. Yeah, if the floats are splitting, can you get away with using less weight? Mind if I ask where you are using this setup (region/body of water, not too specific). ::)
 

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I fish the shuswap river, and the south thompson. Mostly at the beggining of the season i find you need to fish deeper, but later in september about 10-15 ft is good. Last year I did use smaller weight for the floats that I made, and that helped. think I just need to find some good tubing that doesnt split.
 

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Looks like you'll have to wait a while longer to fish this year with the emergency regulations. I hope you get a decent salmon season when it finally comes!
 

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Looks like you'll have to wait a while longer to fish this year with the emergency regulations. I hope you get a decent salmon season when it finally comes!
yea its supposed to open july 25th here but we will see. emergency regulations? do you have a link to that by chance? been here alot about it and seen a bit on facebook but couldnt find it online
 

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Here is what I saw in my email today:

Category(s):
RECREATIONAL - Salmon


Fishery Notice - Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Subject: FN0538-RECREATIONAL - Salmon: Chinook - Region 3 - 2016 Zone 1 Management Actions

Further to FN0523, the Department will be managing fisheries based on
management zone 1 (i.e. returns to the Fraser below or equal to 45,000 chinook)
for Fraser Spring 5-2 and Summer 5-2 chinook.

In Region 3, the following management actions are in place immediately:

- Bridge River: No fishing for Salmon.
- Clearwater River: No fishing for Salmon.
- North Thompson River: No fishing for Salmon.
- Fraser River: No fishing for salmon until August 22, 2016.
- Thompson River: No fishing for salmon until August 22, 2016.
 
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