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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know if there is good bull fishin around?? what about allouette river?
 

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best bull's I ever come across the Chilco R. if its bulls your into it is well worth the trip
 

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Hello roscoe-pco you seem to have a gift of identyfing the difference between a dollie and a bull trout without using D.N.A samples I would like you to teach me that trick it would help me a great deal :eek:
Also if you can tell the difference between a resident rainbow and a steelhead smolt would be great ;) Here is a general rule for the people who are interested. South Coast Coastal Rivers 95% are proven to be bull trout,North Coast Coastal Rivers 95% are dollies.There are exceptions to this rule.If anyone has questions just pm me happy to help :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yah i meant bulls or dollies! i am just looking for a species to target for the winter months and i heard these are good all year long! i am fairly new to BC so i am still learning the species and techniques,, much different from bass and pike fishin in ontario!
 

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When it comes to winter fishing around here I think you'll find the majority have the steelhead itch right now! The runs are starting and continue through the end of April.
 

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Gibbs said:
yah i meant bulls or dollies! i am just looking for a species to target for the winter months and i heard these are good all year long! i am fairly new to BC so i am still learning the species and techniques,, much different from bass and pike fishin in ontario!
The Squamish has good numbers of Bull trout! You can usually find some everytime out. The Squamish is probably the best bet for bulls in the lower mainland, accessible by foot. :)
 

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Hey Sage2106lb..........Are you saying all southwestern and coastal streams of BC are "bull trout" & all northern streams are dolly varden char? Where do you get this information from and could you please elaborate?
Ortho 8)
 

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fishortho said:
Hey Sage2106lb..........Are you saying all southwestern and coastal streams of BC are "bull trout" & all northern streams are dolly varden char? Where do you get this information from and could you please elaborate?
Ortho 8)
Sage2106lb is correct! Read this attachment writen by Preston Singletary!


[attachment deleted by admin]
 

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No offence gibbs, baerg...I did not intend this to turn into a hijack, I was only trying to add something in regards to his statement that he was looking for a "species to target for the winter months". But I get the point...

Sorry Gibbs...
I might add that I don't often target bulls directly, but think they are an awesome fish...usually I find I catch them incidently while looking for other species, but after reading the article Rick posted a link to, I know it would be awesome to target these fish on the fly. I am trying to think of other places you might find these fish, and I would bet that tributaries to any of the larger, deeper, colder lakes nearby would likely produce these fish year round, but hopefully someone will add to that as I have only looked into it to a lesser degree...

Rib
 

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Squamish is a great system to try and for the most part quite accessible. You can try the lower river but I have had most of my success in the upper river above the reservation. There are some really nice looking pieces of water I like to fish around the 28 mile mark which provide some great fishing. If you are flyfishing I find that they respond really well to a stripped retrieve rather than just a swung fly and as far as patterns go if the water is on the dirty side I will go big and dark or olive if the water is clearer I tend to stick to the brighter flies. I haven't fished gear on the Squamish but I am assuming drifting a flesh pattern or egg setup would get the fish biting as well. Haven't checked in this years regs but I am assuming there is a bait ban in effect and all catch and release. These fish provide a good battle not to mention the added potential of getting one of those 6-8 lb monsters. As far as steelhead go the Squamish has a later run around march and april and it is pretty small. Not a lot of people around and beautiful scenery I would definitely go and check it out.
 

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I caught my first bull trout this week at high tide in the alouette river where harris road crosses it using a crome number 2 blue fox vibrax. At first I thought is was a dolly varden based on its description but after reading an article in this thread i have realized it was probably a bull trout. It was over 16 inches and was in beautiful condition. It gave me quite a fight but was happy to be let go.

Markopoco
 

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I found the thead on the Bull trout/dolly varden interesting, but it does not exclude the fact that some of the fish normally thought to stay north do not migrate south and take up residence in our streams, some of them riding on the heels of the fall salmon migrations.
Just for interest, I would like those who are interested to google "bull trout"
and check out the Idaho Fish & Game Dept. I.D. & Education program (maybe someone could attach the article to this post??.)...Try the I.D.and Educational test and see how you do.....Interesting to say the least.......Ortho 8)
 

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You guys got it backwards.

Dollies are anadromous & resident fish. Only found where streams lead to pacific ocean. Bull trout are strictly resident fish. Bull trout alone are only found in the Peace region, Alberta, etc. Bull trout are found throughout most of the rest of BC. Bull trout & Dollies do co-exist in most of this province. Around Prince George (home) in lakes & most rivers like the Nechako & crooked I have only caught Bull trout, yet have caught both bulls and dollies in the Bowron. Have only caught Dollies in Skeena/Kitimat and only Dollies in lower mainland (but not much time spent there!) The fish in the pic is a beauty Bull Trout , though. I find it easy to tell 'em apart, but the are quite similar. Bull trout have a larger, broader head, bigger mouth and usually darker colors. While Dollies are more bright, smaller head and thinner. Feeding habits can be different as well, as Dollies are more of a scavanger, picking off eggs, bugs, smolts, while Bull trout, scavange as well and are an ambush predator too. They'll eat mice, frogs and have even heard ducklings.

I have some arcticles & fish biology books that say same and show distribution.

Go to online regs and go to fish facts....it'll tell you dollies are a coastal fish. (nothing on Bull trout, though) Even check your tidal waters regs, describes dollies.
 

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Tacheeda said:
You guys got it backwards.

Dollies are anadromous & resident fish. Only found where streams lead to pacific ocean. Bull trout are strictly resident fish. Bull trout alone are only found in the Peace region, Alberta, etc. Bull trout are found throughout most of the rest of BC. Bull trout & Dollies do co-exist in most of this province. Around Prince George (home) in lakes & most rivers like the Nechako & crooked I have only caught Bull trout, yet have caught both bulls and dollies in the Bowron. Have only caught Dollies in Skeena/Kitimat and only Dollies in lower mainland (but not much time spent there!) The fish in the pic is a beauty Bull Trout , though. I find it easy to tell 'em apart, but the are quite similar. Bull trout have a larger, broader head, bigger mouth and usually darker colors. While Dollies are more bright, smaller head and thinner. Feeding habits can be different as well, as Dollies are more of a scavanger, picking off eggs, bugs, smolts, while Bull trout, scavange as well and are an ambush predator too. They'll eat mice, frogs and have even heard ducklings.

I have some arcticles & fish biology books that say same and show distribution.

Go to online regs and go to fish facts....it'll tell you dollies are a coastal fish. (nothing on Bull trout, though) Even check your tidal waters regs, describes dollies.
So are saying that the DNA studies done on Bull trout and Dolly varden are incorect? Read these articles. http://article.pubs.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/...olume=63&calyLang=eng&articleFile=f06-026.pdf

[attachment deleted by admin]
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
hey thanks for all good info.. this subject really stirred the pot eh! i'm planning on heading to squamish this weekend to try and hit into some "bulls" or "dollies" ! i'll take either one!!!
cheers!
 
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