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i was told that there are carp in Lake Okangan. Are there many around Kelowna or just down around Penticton also should they be killed if they are caught.
 

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Carp like elevated bars (gravel/sand) and patrol these on an almost constant basis. You can't "chum" over here overwise I'd be telling you to lay down some mashed bread and corn on a gravel bar for a couple of days and then fish it ;-) The only way you will get to know these routes is to put some time in observing the fish and where they show. This time of the year they will start to enter full spawning mode and you'll see them crashing around (but not nessasarily feeding) once spawning has finished they will be on the feed and a good pair of polarized glasses should reveal clouds of mud/debri or even the fish themselves. Take note of time of day, wind direction etc etc and just plan your day around those occurances. If you want any more details then pm me. I've had lots of experience with big carp on BIG lakes and would gladly share some info with ya :)
 

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I read an article in BC Outdoors Sportfishing mag where the author had bypassed the no-chumming rule by installing birdfeeders on his chosen runs.
 

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That's a clever way of 'bending' the rules. I used to use a cage feeder stuffed with particles which I tied to the end of the line, I then attached the hooklength about 1' above. It's called a paternoster rig and was very effective in the big lakes in the USA. I'm not sure though even though you're not physically throwing food into the water by hand if that is legal up here....
 

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^ let us know how it goes, my koi outside are feeding like mad and goldfishes are already chasing each other round, hope they're all active in the lakes :)
 

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I would love to know more as to why in North America it is illigal to "ground bait" for coarse fish. I've always viewed it as a little backward thinking in my opinion! Its been standard practice all over Europe since Isaac Walton's day with no detriment to environment or fish....

Anybody have any thoughts on this.......?
 

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I totally agree with the baiting part, when fishing for course fish.
Coming from Europe and being very active in carp fishing Mania over seas,you dont even want to know how much chuming happens at a single carp fishing competion
usually there is like 15-20 teams per compeetion,each team two guys and a reserve or a coach usually,each get a spot or pieace of water and it goes on for usually 72 hours with chumming alowed ones a day for an hour,some different rules can appear on different lakes.

Now hear this part, this is what would take to be successfull at some event,on averagge 35-50 KG not pounds lol, of partical bait(corn,hay,bird food,pellets and other simillar food)and usually 20-30 kg of "Boilies" which is home made most popular bait for carp in europe,to make it more clear they are a mixe of different flowers,chemicals eggs and other substances by choice that are rolled and boiled into litlle balls 12-18 mm in diametar and are rigged on a hair rig under the hook,or used for chumming.

Now i can go on and on for ever,but i would like to hear from pepole familiar with this type of fishing is,if they have any evidence of it effecting the fish or the enviroment in a bad way?

PS I'm not even gonna start how much it costs for all this.............
 

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I talked to an old boy when I was working in Fort St John who told me when he was a kid they used to punch holes in a can of dog food and toss it in the Peace River, then go back a week later and haul out huge dollies.
 

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I totally agree with the baiting part, when fishing for course fish.
Coming from Europe and being very active in carp fishing Mania over seas,you dont even want to know how much chuming happens at a single carp fishing competion
usually there is like 15-20 teams per compeetion,each team two guys and a reserve or a coach usually,each get a spot or pieace of water and it goes on for usually 72 hours with chumming alowed ones a day for an hour,some different rules can appear on different lakes.

Now hear this part, this is what would take to be successfull at some event,on averagge 35-50 KG not pounds lol, of partical bait(corn,hay,bird food,pellets and other simillar food)and usually 20-30 kg of "Boilies" which is home made most popular bait for carp in europe,to make it more clear they are a mixe of different flowers,chemicals eggs and other substances by choice that are rolled and boiled into litlle balls 12-18 mm in diametar and are rigged on a hair rig under the hook,or used for chumming.

Now i can go on and on for ever,but i would like to hear from pepole familiar with this type of fishing is,if they have any evidence of it effecting the fish or the enviroment in a bad way?

PS I'm not even gonna start how much it costs for all this.............
If you think carp fishing is expensive you have no idea how much can be spent on the open match circuit! Just to be on an even keel with the pro's you need some kind of sponsorship to help pay for bait, entry fees, travel, equipment. Added to that the cost of a nice piece of carbon (read pole) at nearly $7k plus all the other rods and reels needed for float, feeder fishing it really adds up. I think I kinda like the more simplistic way of fishing over here, and there's certainly not the pressure involved at a big weigh in with 5 or 600 other anglers looking over your shoulder lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
had a qiuck look down at the board walk in kelowna couldn't see any but looked like some spots would be good to try, bonus is the babes wow got to love k town. tight lines
 

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There are some weekend warriors that use crossbows to kill carp. I've seen them at Duck Lake and Wood Lake just north of Kelowna. Despite being bottom feeders and coarse fish, they are actually quite cool looking and they get very big and put up a good tussle so can't see why people would want to kill them. I don't think they compete for trout or kokannee food.
 

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Commonly eaten in eastern Europe and Asia. Also I believe there is a Jewish festival that requires carp. Never eaten one so I can't say what they taste like. Never fancied freshwater bottom feeders but then they used to call sturgeon 'Poor man's beefsteak'. Anyone ever eaten sturgeon BTW?
 
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