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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I'm looking for some info.... maybe some local wisdom , or just if anybody's tried this technique. I'm talking about deep water with braid and short, stiff, fast action rods in our local waters. I tried searching..... a lot, and can't find any information from a local perspective. I realize we don't have near the variety of fish as they have got down south, but I'm really curious about trying this out. Do we have fishable fish down deep, say 300-400 feet?

Any info or opinions appreciated.

Rod
 

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We bottom fish off the WCVI down fairly deep but not 300-400 feet.

Are you talking about in the local Vancouver/Straight of Georgia waters?

What are you looking to target? The usual bottom dwellers are lings, hali, rockfish of different types, flounder, sole etc In "local" waters around Vancouver unfortunately no matter how deep you want to get down lings and rockies are pretty much closed in most areas. If doing "catch and release" on rockies you are more than likely going to end up killing anything you bring up.

Based on your original question.....no it is not a normal means of fishing "locally" due to closures and low, low populations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Based on your original question.....no it is not a normal means of fishing "locally" due to closures and low, low populations.
Well that wasn't really my question, although closures and low populations are facts, they can't be the reason this technique isn't popular here. I would counter that until the advent of braid line, it wasn't really practical (or even possible)with the current, and the weight that you would need just to reach that depth. As todays gear can be both strong and light, shouldn't this open new waters to us?
 

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People have hand lined for hali for hundreds of years in hundreds of feet of water around here so the braid really didnt help find the bottom dwellers.
 

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Well where and what are you looking to catch?

When you really can't fish for rockies or lings locally......and halibut are a rarity why would you bother deep water fishing for fish that are rare, you can't keep or will die from the "bends" when you bring them up?

People aren't going to fish 300-400' down trying to hook sockeye.....and jigging isn't the most productive way to fish for salmon as you're not covering a lot of water.

As I said....sure it is done around the Island and up the coast but that is in areas where there ARE halibut and you can keep lings/rockies but as mentioned you certainly don't need to be down that deep.

Have a look at the fishing regs and tell me what you intend to target as a species? Sablefish ARE down that deep but they are hardly a fish targetted by sporties, there are skate which are hardly a "targetted" species as well and are generally bycatch. Yes there are other little bottom dwelling fish.....but to be honest I don't know what you would be targetting 400' down.
 

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Well that wasn't really my question, although closures and low populations are facts, they can't be the reason this technique isn't popular here. I would counter that until the advent of braid line, it wasn't really practical (or even possible)with the current, and the weight that you would need just to reach that depth. As todays gear can be both strong and light, shouldn't this open new waters to us?
It kind of was your first question answered.......there ARE fish down there locally but they are far from abundant AND you are going to kill some species by dragging them up from the depths.

It doesn't matter if you you have strong and light gear.....or weak and heavy.....if you feel this opening up new waters to yourself then have at er'. Just be sure you realize what you're going to be catching and be mindful that the mortality on these fish in areas where there is NO retention is not going to be viewed in the best light.:peace:

Putting up a report of dragging bottom dwellers up all day while fishing in Howe Sound where there is zippo for retention on some of the key species is not a practice I would support.
 

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It kind of was your first question answered.......there ARE fish down there locally but they are far from abundant AND you are going to kill some species by dragging them up from the depths.

It doesn't matter if you you have strong and light gear.....or weak and heavy.....if you feel this opening up new waters to yourself then have at er'. Just be sure you realize what you're going to be catching and be mindful that the mortality on these fish in areas where there is NO retention is not going to be viewed in the best light.:peace:

Putting up a report of dragging bottom dwellers up all day while fishing in Howe Sound where there is zippo for retention on some of the key species is not a practice I would support.
I agree with you PIP

I did see a thing on one of the saltwater fishing shows on WFN that you can insert behind the pectoral fin and bleed the air out of the swim bladders of those deep caught fish that you want to release.

Rowdy if its closed its closed like pip said if there is nothing down there to keep or safely catch and release whats the point?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
whooo, just whoooo......guys- I'm not talking about raping the sea. And I wasn't trying to give the impression that I wanted to drag up fish and watch them die! I was asking if there was anything worth targeting, I was asking if anybody had some experience and knowledge they would like to share. Trust me guys, you don't need the soup box when you talk to me. Remember, not everyone fishes salmon 24/7. Closures do sometimes become openings, so let's assume that's what I meant.....OK?

Anybody out there with actual experience with the "technique"? I know I said 300-400 feet, but info on the technique is what I'm really interested in. Has it been tried on salmon or hali?
 

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Rowdy....

What are you considering "local" waters? Am I correct that you are likely looking at areas 28/29?

If you look at the species limits/tables for area 28/29 you're pretty limited for "deepwater" jigging to skate, sculpin, sole/flounder (don't need to be "deep"), greenling and sand lance:p. I have never heard of sablefish being caught in local waters but you'll see also that area 28/29 are closed to rockfish and ling cod.

http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/species-especes/fintable-tableaupoisson-eng.htm

The "closures" in 28/29 have been in effect for quite some time and I sure wouldn't expect them to turn into "openings" anytime soon. ;)


So.....the species I noted above are pretty much it for "deepwater jigging".
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"local waters" would mean southern Vancouver Island, I would prefer areas 28/29, but i'm more interested in this particular technique.

Just so we are all on the same page here, by "jigging", I'm not referring to our classic- hit bottom, reel up a couple feet and slowly pull up-let fall-repeat system. The technique they're using down south appears to be a sound system. A long, slender, bottom weighted jig, dropped to the bottom or near to, and very quickly jigged up while giving the reel a half crank each pull. I really wanted to know if this could be productive on a school of fish at any given depth. And by using the particular jigs that seem popular, I would think that we could find fish on the 'ol sounder and have another choice on how to fish them.

hhmmmm?
 

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I reallllly dont understand why, I have only ever fished up to about 150' maybe 200 if on a drop and going down the slope but here goes.

I've heard spots off kelp beds in 100 - 200 feet off water where the reefs drop off almost like cliff faces down to 300+ feet, where guys have been know to pull up all sorts of things, lings depending on the season, rock fish off all shapes and colours and even the odd halibut, but not that that is really ideal. I would imagine a glow stick on a spreader bar trolled on bottom would work well considering it's nearly pitch black down that deep.

As for the schools of fish your talking of, you said earlier you weren't chasing salmon, and the majority large rockfish school like black bass etc. are within the top 50 feet of water, or from what I've seen anyways. You could jig for springs in deeper water in the summer, and jig it up from over 100 feet down all the up through the pinks and coho i guess if you a found a school all the way through the water column, and we able to stay with them for any length of time.

But still I dont reaaaaally see the practical aspect of it. Seems like a lot of work for something that can be done in 100 feet of water, but hey, fill your boots, just post pictures if it works out.
 

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I know where you're coming from rowdy. Fishing for salmon is great but sometimes you just feel like a change. After all a big part of fishing for me at least, is the lure of the unknown. Never being totally sure what's on the other end of the line. For this reason I have tried the kind of deep jigging you describe. The results were less than satisfying. It seems the deeper you go after 250' the smaller and scarcer the fish become. Ive gone as deep as 600' and at that depth even with braided line the drag becomes so great that you can tell there is very little action on the lure at the bottom when you jig the line. The fish at these depths seem to consist mostly of bullheads, ratfish, small flounder and other small critters. Nothing too exciting. Ive heard of guys catching thresher sharks down deep, but that was on the WCVI.
Lately I've been thinking about trying for deep water squid, but I haven't totally figured out how to go about it yet. I know the best way would be to go at night with a light shining into the water, but I'm pretty sure that's illegal. I digress.
 

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I really wanted to know if this could be productive on a school of fish at any given depth. And by using the particular jigs that seem popular, I would think that we could find fish on the 'ol sounder and have another choice on how to fish them.

hhmmmm?
well buddy i would suggest you get out there and try it, then you can let us all know if the southern method works..
 

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This topic really interests me as I have been wonderingexactly the same thing as Rowdy? Thereis a variety of deep water fish to be caught in the Strait of Georgia (SOG),but you shouldn’t expect to fish in areas 28 or 29. They are mostly closed tolingcod and rockfish and that is the most likely fish you will catch. Area 17 has rockfish and lingcod retention(one each per day) which means you can go out with a partner and catch two ofeach while exploring the deeps. You can evenlet the lings go as they have no swim bladder and can take the trip to thesurface, not rockfish. In SOG there are about half a dozen flatfish species,Pacific cod, Pacific Hake, skates, various sculpins, some halibut, supposedly arelic black cod population, and others which are open, but if you fish for themin most of area 29 you will kill rockfish which you cannot retain.
I fish area 17 so I’m going deep exploring this summer. To that end I picked up a new Penn 340gtlevel wind reel, spooled it with about 300 m of 50# fluorocarbon backing toppedwith 300 m of 50# Power Pro braid (total about 2000 feet). The reel is on a 6’6” uglystick. I checked it out yesterday to see how it isto bring up. With a 1kg weight on aspreader bar (the max you are allowed to use) it took about 3 minutes to crankup from 650’ and I had no trouble keeping it on the bottom (no hooks, just atest run after trolling). I’m planningon using bait, likely squid or live fish like greenling, as they stay on a hookand you don’t want to check bait too often. I’ve tried bouncing a 12oz leadhead power bait for halibut and after an hour or so it wears real thin so I’llstick with bait to start. Rockfish probably open on May 1[SUP]st[/SUP] so I’llstart then and keep you posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for chiming in Ling, i've been doing loads of research and am convinced this is a sound technique... both for the bottom and through out the entire water column. I got nice rod on order now, and a dream reel that i chose not to mention for the flames would be far too intense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
No and no. I'm a spinning kinda guy. Does someone make an electric spinner? That would be soooo cool, a "must have" fersure!


(fyi.....the jigs i was referring to way back in this thread are called Butterfly jigs....just noticed I never updated that. If interested just look for them on YouTube....Shimano and others make them now)
 
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