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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, some recent articles here in the Midwest have me concerned about the fish consumption advisories, and some false information about the Great Lakes;

Contaminants in Steelhead Trout Prompt Warning
By Tom Henry, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio

Mar. 1--Steelhead trout caught from Lake Erie tributaries should not be eaten more than once a month now, according to updated fish-consumption advisories to be released starting today with 2007 Ohio fishing licenses.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's annual update, based largely on tissue samples from 318 fish, does not substantially change basic advice anglers have been given for years to avoid overexposure to cancer-causing polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, as well as mercury and other contaminants that pollute the state's water bodies.

The enhanced trout advisory applies to Lake Erie tributaries in Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, Cuyahoga, Lake, Lorain, and Ashtabula counties, the state agency said.

In general, people are advised to limit consumption of Ohio fish to once a week agency spokesman Linda Oros said.

Some waterways, though, such as North Toledo's Ottawa River, have longstanding Ohio Department of Health advisories that warn people not to eat any fish caught from them.

Others, such as the Cuyahoga and Ohio rivers, have several species of fish that should not be eaten more than once every two months.

The advisories are based on a variety of factors that include average body fat and contaminants in fish tissue.

To minimize risk, cooks are advised to cut away fat and broil or bake instead of fry.

Much of today's water pollution, especially mercury, falls from the sky and settles on rivers, lakes, and streams after getting into the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources as well as vehicle exhausts.

Some pollutants, though, are so hardy they have remained embedded in sediment. Certain industrial water discharges were banned under the federal Clean Water Act of 1972.

One bright spot: Sunfish and yellow perch are now deemed safe to eat twice a week under the new advisories.

The drawback: Fishermen have reported a steady decline in Lake Erie's yellow perch for years.

Advisories fluctuate from region to region.

Brown bullhead, for example, are generally safe to eat twice a week in northwest Ohio.

But in parts of northeast Ohio, they're so polluted they should not be consumed more than once every two months, Ms. Oros said.

For more specifics, residents are advised to check with local health departments, the state EPA, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, and Women, Infant, and Children centers.

Contact Tom Henry at: [email protected] or 419-724-6079.

Copyright (c) 2007, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio

___________________________________________________________________________________________
"I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but I just had to ad this page as I was concerned about the false information in this article by Jeffrey Frischkorn. from the News Herald. He say's that the Grand River gets a good grade? Give me a break! I will never fish the Grand River below Mason's Landing again for one reason. I used to fish what is widely known as the Uniroyal Hole, and Pipe Bridge, which I will never do again because of what I saw there about 10 years ago. I was wading just below the Uni hole and I was on the west side of the river after crossing between the Pipe and Uni. While I was there, I noticed a pipe just above the river, and some chartreuse (color) liquid was running out of it. It looked like it was anti-freeze to me. When another angler showed up, and we exchanged pleasantries, I asked him if that looked like anti-freeze to him coming out of that pipe? His response was nonchalant, and matter of fact; "That's not anti-freeze! That's hexavalent chromium from the old Diamond Shamrock plant, and It's been leaking for years!"

Then I saw the movie Erin Brockovich and that made up my mind to quit fishing the Grand river!

Notice how he casually mentions it in closing and nothing else? Hum??


[size=10pt]Area river lands 'Grand' grades [/size]
By: Jeffrey L. Frischkorn

[email protected]

01/25/2007

In spite of continued developmental and agricultural stresses, the Grand River watershed remains environmentally sound. However, chemical pollution, sediments and farm runoff all are having a negative impact on several of the river's tributaries in Lake and Ashtabula counties. The assessment comes from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, which closely monitors the Grand River's water quality status.
In Northeast Ohio, the OEPA's most recent report on the Grand River's water quality "revealed exceptional habitat and biological diversity throughout the basin. "This basin includes portions of Lake, Geauga and Ashtabula counties. The Grand River extends 98.5 miles from its start in Geauga County to where it enters Lake Erie at Fairport Harbor and Painesville Township. At its source, the Grand River is 1,117 feet above sea level, dropping to 573 feet above sea level at Lake Erie. It drains 705 square miles.
The high quality of the streams in the watershed can be attributed to large areas of unaltered habitat resulting from the river's isolation from populated upland areas, the report says. "This report highlights what the Grand River Partners has been saying for a while: that the health of the stream is exceptional," said Eddie Dengg, executive director of the Painesville-based Grand River Partners.
"It only reinforces a 1997 federal report which calls the Grand River the most biologically diverse stream flowing into Lake Erie whether that be from the U.S. or Canada. "OEPA spokeswoman Dina Pierce said every stream in every state is required by the federal government to be monitored.
It is done to see that the streams "are fishable, swimable and drinkable."
"The cleaner the water is to start with, the less expensive it becomes to make it drinkable," Pierce said. Pierce said the Grand River received "really good scores. "And it just wasn't the river but a number of its tributaries as well," Pierce said.
Eventually the data collected will be used to develop what is called "a total maximum daily load," which highlights wherever impairments are found, Pierce said. "This is community driven. We put out the report and then hold public meetings with interested stakeholders on what needs to be done to improve water quality," Pierce said. "The only thing we might mandate is improvements to wastewater treatment plants. The emphasis is on the community. This is an ongoing process."
Land preservation through parkland acquisition - such as those by Lake Metroparks, the Ashtabula County Metro Parks and the Geauga Park District - as well as conservation easements have helped protect the river, Pierce said. "Lake Metroparks recognized many years ago the significance of the Grand River and we worked on several different plans that were aimed at protecting the integrity of its watershed in Lake County," said Steve Madewell, Lake Metroparks deputy director. "In the late 1980s and early 1990s, we worked with a number of partners to encourage other conservation organizations to increase their commitment as well because we knew we couldn't do the job alone."
Monitoring data collected by the OEPA in 2003 and 2004 suggest the river's diversity includes many rare, threatened and endangered plant and animal species.
Downstream from Mill Creek in Ashtabula County, the river supports the last naturally reproducing muskellunge population found in any of Ohio's Lake Erie tributaries, the report says. "The quality of the Grand River in terms of fish populations is excellent. We've done some electro-shock work in a portion of the river and sampled 15 different species in less than 17 minutes, that include young-of-the-year walleye and a 12-inch muskie," said Phil Hillman, the Ohio Division of Wildlife's fish management supervisor for Northeast Ohio. "It's also loaded with freshwater mussels. We're well aware there's a wide variety of species." However, the river and its tributaries remain vulnerable to stresses such as summertime low water levels and pollution. Contrary to most people's thoughts, the most serious threats to the watershed are not agricultural runoff or erosion from forestry practices, but rather from increasing urban development, Dengg also said. "Especially in the western portion of the watershed," Dengg said. "As we lose natural cover along the corridor, that only degrades the river's water quality." Chief among them is impairments caused by urban and suburban runoff into such tributaries as Red, Kellogg, Ellison, Big and Jordan creeks, the report says. Cemetery Creek in Ashtabula County also is encountering this degradation, the report says.
And Mill Creek near Jefferson suffers from farm runoff, chiefly sedimentation. The aquatic life in the Grand River and near the former Diamond Shamrock lagoons in Painesville and Painesville Township also is meeting criteria and continues to improve over the years, the report says.
But other abandoned waste ponds near here continue to leach hexavalent chromium into the river at levels that exceed water quality standards.
The report recommends continued monitoring and reducing the discharges by at least 40 percent.
The complete report is available for viewing online at GrandRiverBasinTSD2006.pdf.

Sources:

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/hexchrom/
http://www.dhs.ca.gov/opa/prssrels/2001/18-01.htm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/chromium.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexavalent_chromium http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hexavalentchromium/index.html http://www.epa.gov/iris/toxreviews/0144-tr.pdf
 

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Luckily our waterways are nowhere near as polluted as the great lake areas. Never have we had any warning on eating our catch, unless it is shellfish in the chuck, Redtide!

BC Fish are nice and clean!!!! Good to eat all the time too!
 

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Yup even though we do have urban, and some rural flows that we would feel or are deamed polluted (by Canadian standards)by different groups, it is not even comparable to the pollution of the great lakes and their tribs. I've seen some of the shorelines of Erie and Ontario. :p :p Luckily Huron hasn't reached that state yet. Or maybe it has,.. it's been a few summers since I was there last. Typically our fish are safe to eat and hopefully will always stay that way.

Finder ;)
 

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well i do remember when i was a kid i remember this one fall when the salmon had these like worms in them which wasnt cool and we couldnt eat them however you didnt know till you cut them open

anyone else remember that i mean it was years and years ago i think i was 12 or so then and it wasnt all the fish just some

maybe someone knows why this happened and hasnt again??


tight lines

HOOK
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hook,
If I'm not mistaken those were like leaches or parasites or something? A friend in Oregon also had a steelie with 'worms', it was pretty weird when he landed the fish, all these worms started falling out of it's gills? I wish that was all we had to worry about here in Ohio, but it's getting much worse than that now. Last Fall I was out fishing for Pictures when I came to a favorite hole and saw this floating where I used to fish. All the other anglers just looked the other way when I tried (with one arm) to pull it out of the water. I've got so many photo's with bikes, washing machines and other household items in the rivers here it's really getting my goat and I've got the itch to head back out west!
I guess it's to be expected when you live in what was known as "The mistake on the lake!"




FISH ON!
Herb
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Why is there so much pollution back east? Is it because all the major cities all bunched up in such a little area? I watch fishing shows on catching steelhead in very small streams in ontario and never do they mention the fish are contaminated or the water they are fishing is polluted!

C.K.
 

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I came from Ontario and I can tell you that the pristine like wilderness taken for granted here in the west is very hard to get to back east. I grew up fishing during the summers at our cottage. Since I was a kid I can always remember some form of limit on how many of a certain species you should eat. However it seemed to get worse and worse to where today there are plenty of great fishing lakes in southern Ontario where you literally should not eat any fish from them. There are lots of good fishing opportunites close to and in some cases right in major population centers like Toronto but you usually have to travel far from the majority of the great lakes to find pristine-like wilderness. Yes it does exist and its not all bad though. I have drank water directly from a few northern Ontario lakes and streams that I flew into. The first time I did that I was 22 years old and it was an experience I will never forget. There was an article in S&S Journal a while back that encapsulated the experience of drinking from a fresh stream or lake very well. A connection we've lost by drinking from a tap or bottle.,,,,but I digress,,,, Ya large popualtions, long histories of heavy industries, urban sprawl, etc. etc. Not good. One of the problems is that although a lot of heavy industry around the great lakes closed down over the last few decades they left a legacy of abandoned toxic sites which eventually finds its way to the rivers and lakes. However progress has been made, Lake Erie, given up for dead in 60's has gained status since the 90's in sport-fishing and even commercial fishing :-X .
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
steely_crazy said:
I have drank water directly from a few northern Ontario lakes and streams that I flew into. The first time I did that I was 22 years old and it was an experience I will never forget. There was an article in S&S Journal a while back that encapsulated the experience of drinking from a fresh stream or lake very well. A connection we've lost
Hey Steely,
You are so right! When I was a kid growing up in California, I remember one day skipping school so that I could go fishing. Well as most would expect I got caught, and was told I was going to Summer Camp that year as a consequence. What really happened was the Police Department had organized a 3 week Hiking and Camping trip along the John Muier Trail in the 60's. That was supposed to be my punishment? What a life changing experience that was for me! The most beautiful part was, we did drink from many streams and lakes all along the trail, and one in particular was Ruby Lake. When we crossed the summit of one peak on the trail, looking down you could literally see everything in the water! I only spotted the fish, and yes I did fish, and ate! That experience left me with a memory I'll never forget. When it was all said and done, I even skipped school again so that I would be punished more! ;) but that didn't happen.....oh well...Anyways the point is, as much as we hate to admit it those days are soon comming to an end. Global warming, greedy industry, and total lack of respect for our land and natural resources. You could never drink straight from any river or lake around here, unless your trying to kill yourself! Even tho the Lakes are far cleaner than the 60's here, because of the mistakes of the past few decades, it will never be the same. AHhh the good old days, sure wish things were different now....

FISH ON!
Herb
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When is the last time a fish was "tested" for pollutants in the Fraser River watershed?...They have to swim through some pretty grim areas.......Anybody know if our fish get randomly tested for Mercury, etc?
Ortho
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
coho_killer said:
Why is there so much pollution back east? Is it because all the major cities all bunched up in such a little area? I watch fishing shows on catching steelhead in very small streams in ontario and never do they mention the fish are contaminated or the water they are fishing is polluted!

C.K.
Good point CK. But then again, the reason they don't mention it, is because of Sponsorship! Plus they normally do C&R and don't mention the rest. The main problem in the Great Lakes is from all the Big Business of Coal Fired power plants, Steel industry and manufacturing plants all along the Great Lakes shoreline. Even tho the big pond is much cleaner now, than say 20 years ago, is because of the invasive zebra muscles from the ballasts of cargo ships.
 

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Another item I forgot to mention is that in southern Ontario, probably 80%+ of the freshwater lakes within a 3 hour driver of Toronto or any other city basically have been developed like a city would, cottages with small lots, often a 1/4 acre is a big lot. So picture if you will Stave or Allouette lake with wall-to-wall cottages and then imagine they were mostly built in the 40's-60's with little restriction on septic systems and then imagine all those cottages with at least 2 outboard powered boats that are often 2-strokes. You'll start to get the picture and why the biggest pollutants in small lakes is mercury, lead, pcbs, etc. After about 3-4 years of a fish living in the water they are unfit to eat often, especially if its a closed lake with no/little in/out flow. However over the years I've eaten 100's of walleye, bass, catfish, etc. etc.. So hopefully I'll live,,,,,
 

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Hey Ortho, you got me thinking about testing here in BC. Yes it is being done, apparently there are warnings, and they should be in the Freshwater Sport Fisheries Regulations Synopsis (B.C. Fisheries). Although searching through the latest guide online I cannot find it.

http://www.ec.gc.ca/MERCURY/EN/efca.cfm#BC

In 2000/2001 there were only 3 warnings, looks like its just for freshwater though.

These warnings are for mercury levels in bull trout and Dolly Varden from Williston Lake and in lake trout from Pinchi Lake. Normal consumption is not a significant hazard to human health but high consumption may be. The third mercury warning is issued for Jack of Clubs Lake where lake trout over 45 cm may contain elevated mercury levels and to limit consumption. At the time the warning for Jack of Clubs Lake was issued, the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries was not involved. The advisory was issued due to mercury contaminant detected through sampling by B.C. Environment, Environment Canada, provincial and federal health. Based on these sampling result and after consultation with provincial health, the advisory was inserted into the Freshwater Sport Fisheries Regulations Synopsis. These warnings were issued due to past mining activities which resulted in high levels in fish. These mines have now been closed for several years (B.C. Ministry of Enviroment, Land, and Parks, April 2001). Elevated mercury levels at Williston Lake was issued due to damming. The B.C. Ministry of Health did issue a general advisory against consuming fish liver about 7 years ago and it still remains in effect (B.C. Ministry of Health, April 2001).
I also found this on shellfish toxicicity,

http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/x...g=view_notice&lang=en&ID=recreational&ispsp=1

I havent been able to find definitive info on the Salmon/Steelhead toxicity levels but theres a lot of "talk" on the web that these test are being made, this one was interesting and was about sockeye mortality during the spawn in the Fraser.

http://www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pages/release/p-releas/2002/nr067_e.htm

Contaminants Study

It may be possible that recent introductions of new chemicals into the Fraser River and Strait of Georgia are responsible for the abnormal behaviour of Late run sockeye. These fish may be susceptible to chemicals that can mimic or interfere with their normal reproductive development. Research continues through 2002 to determine if chemicals could directly or indirectly change the migration behaviour in salmon. For example, estrogen can mimic changing reproductive timing.
Just cant seem to find "the" answer for Salmon.
 

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I wonder if all the poop going in the ocean from the island would affect the salmon and steelhead?? Either way it definately can't have a positive affect on fish stocks. :mad: ??? ??? :'(

Nates
 

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coho_killer said:
Why is there so much pollution back east? Is it because all the major cities all bunched up in such a little area. C.K.
I agree human encroachment and industrial developement is one reason. Most of Canada's population lives in that south eastern part of the province, on into Quebec. There's more people in the city of Toronto than there is in our province. :p If you list off all the major cities that lie along or are within a 100 miles of the great lakes, it doesn't paint a pretty picture.

Finder :)
 
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