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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,

I'm a first time salt water fisherman. I'm reading as much as possible to learn what I can before venturing out (I think I'll do a charter too, to gleen some additional, useful insight).

But before I get all worked up, I thought I'd ask those of you with experience if my 1700 Pro Sport w/ 115 Merc is suitable for fishing the salt around the harbour, Bowen, etc?

I've been told by a few that it's no problem, but I'd like some additional opinions.


Thanks,

Lund-lubber.
 

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Unlike some things boat size does not matter around the Vancouver area, but is it reliable ? Is your motor in good working condition, do you have a kicker { small motor } also, do you have a signal device in case you run into trouble, ie whistle, flare gun, cell phone, VHF radio or CB onboard. As long as you are prepared for the worst you should be okay. Always make sure you have enough gas onboard for the day because the coast guard will not come to help you unless you are in immediate danger and this means sinking or if someone is dying. Watch your tides, some places even with a small tide the water can really rip through like the first narrows. As long as you respect the water and don't do anything silly like getting hammered well out fishing you should have a very enjoyable day on the water but it is a great idea to first utilizes a guide to help you learn more. Good luck L-L and let us know if you get out and how you did...........................
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bill,

Thanks for the reply.

Yes, the boat and motor is reliable - it's an '06. I have all the necessary signalling devices and plan on buying a little VHF radio (any recommendations?).

I hope to get my ducks in a row so I can be out there in April and give it a try.

I'm reading as much as I can as there's tons of great info in the SW forum. I'm also planning on doing a charter before I venture out.

I'll definately be posting pictures and comments on my efforts.
 

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Not to turn a hose on the party, but if you are heading out locally, make yourself VERY familiar with the area and carry ALL the recommended safety equipment for your boat.. They don't call the "wet" coast the "Graveyard of the Pacific" for nothing....Ortho 8)
 

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Land-lubber,
I have to agree with all the replies I see to your post. 5 years ago, I came out here with a 17 foot prosport lund with a 115 Merc, kicker etc. The first summer I fished the Canal, Port Renfrew and Samson Narrows. It was a beautiful summer and certainly helped with our decision to move to the island. The next year saw us trying to do our normal amount of fishing and it wasn't long before we ran into trouble. Our little bow rider was great when the weather was calm, but get caught out in a bit of wind and things change. Nothing gets the women upset faster than a 6 inch wall of water washing down through the walk through windshield and into the back of the boat. To my mind they are great lake boats, but for the waters out here, they aren't man enough. I went up to an 18.5 Double Eagle and found out why they call this paradise. Comfortable and yet small enough to handle anything the inside can throw at it. Not that you challange Hurricane Gussy, but capable enough that you can go out and always get back. Your Lund will do it for you, but be careful of the weather. Always have a backup motor, a radio and the appropriate safety gear. Enjoy your summer, keep your tip up and your line tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Stress Medicine. Duely noted and appreciated.

Land-lubber
Ahem, note the nic is Lund-lubber. Me likes me Pro Sport ;D
 

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LL.........

I think most of the replies have summed things up. You should be okay out there, but if you were going to venture over to Bowen area or up into Howe Sound (hole in the wall) be aware of monitoring the marine forecast as the winds can blow up and you mix that with a good tide and things can get snotty quickly. The good thing is in most of the areas you will be if things get really snotty there are plenty of places you can duck into to escape the elements rather than risk a run back into English Bay or wherever you drop your boat in the water.

A charter is a good idea for learning some of the fishing techniques etc out in the salt (or ask fishingmagician as the more and more I read from him he is well versed in the local waters). If you don't have much experience ruuning a boat out on the chuck stay within your comfort level. A glass calm morning out on the water can blow up quickly which can make a run from Ambleside to False Creek in a boat like yours "uncomfortable". ;) Not sure if you have ever taken it but a great course that for the dollar value is excellent is the Power Squadron. I took it a few years back and although some classes are redundant I would highly recommend it.

Big thing I would recommend..........is ask any of us questions. I am learning more and more from the fishing aspect from a few of the good guys on the salt side of things, but I have been running boats in the local waters for a number of years.

On a quick side note....a lot of "smaller" boats launch at Ambleside and just work the waters back and forth along the north shore. I remember being out I think this past summer seeing a little "punt" maybe at the most 10' long with an electric trolling motor on it just off Ambleside on a few occasions.

Oh........and be careful and watching the shipping lanes. Those big freighters can be deceiving as to how fast they can bear down on you.....not to mention the wake they throw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pippen,

I've been voraciously reading the entire SW forum and following along in the recent posts and there's a TONS of valuable information.

If any of you see me on the water (my boat is the Lund pictured to the left), please give a wave or come over and say hi. You'll probably see a ream of crib notes and "cheat sheets" plastered on my dash from all these great posts :)
 

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Lund-lubber said:
Pippen,

I've been voraciously reading the entire SW forum and following along in the recent posts and there's a TONS of valuable information.

If any of you see me on the water (my boat is the Lund pictured to the left), please give a wave or come over and say hi. You'll probably see a ream of crib notes and "cheat sheets" plastered on my dash from all these great posts :)
I will definitely keep an eye out. One other thing to remember is that the open bow of your boat would be a GREAT place to tuck a couple crab or prawn traps to drop on your way out to fish. ;) ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Pippen said:
One other thing to remember is that the open bow of your boat would be a GREAT place to tuck a couple crab or prawn traps to drop on your way out to fish. ;) ;)
Oh man...that's a whole other ream of notes for something else I have to learn about :eek: ;)
 

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Lund-lubber said:
Pippen said:
One other thing to remember is that the open bow of your boat would be a GREAT place to tuck a couple crab or prawn traps to drop on your way out to fish. ;) ;)
Oh man...that's a whole other ream of notes for something else I have to learn about :eek: ;)
If you have a depth sounder or enough line on a trap.........start with crabs. English Bay has a good population......we limited out on Sunday with just a 2 hour soak in about 70 or so feet of water. I do like salmon but a nice crab feast is the tops on my list.

Once the weather get's better (if you are a fairweather boater ;) should you ever decide you want someone to head out with you in the local waters for a few hours let me know. Just follow fishingmagicians boat for salmon ;) (I know I will be this year) but I would happy to help you out with crabbing in the local waters.


BTW........here is the link to the Vancouver Power Squadron if you were interested. There are courses throughout the lower mainland but this gives you a bit of a run down of course content.

http://vancouver.powersquadron.ca/boating.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Pippen said:
If you have a depth sounder or enough line on a trap.........start with crabs. English Bay has a good population......we limited out on Sunday with just a 2 hour soak in about 70 or so feet of water. I do like salmon but a nice crab feast is the tops on my list.
A catch of crab and some cold beer....mmmmmm

Once the weather get's better (if you are a fairweather boater ;) should you ever decide you want someone to head out with you in the local waters for a few hours let me know. Just follow fishingmagicians boat for salmon ;) (I know I will be this year) but I would happy to help you out with crabbing in the local waters.
Absolutely! That would be great to have you aboard and I'd appreciate the help.

I guess I'll know fishingmagician's boat from the flotilla other fishers behind him, eh?

BTW........here is the link to the Vancouver Power Squadron if you were interested. There are courses throughout the lower mainland but this gives you a bit of a run down of course content.

http://vancouver.powersquadron.ca/boating.html
Thank you for that. I forgot to mention that I purchased their online materials last year. Still gotta crack them open, though.
 

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I would definitely say that the size of your boat is fine to fish locally. Other questions that may be more important are, do you have the right equipment to be successful fishing locally. Unless fishing for Coho, downriggers are pretty much essential. A depth sounder is also needed if fishing with riggers. Trolling with a 115 is not impossible, but certainly burns a lot of fuel. If the motor is a 2 stroke you will also quickly foul your plugs trolling. The best solution for safety, slow trolling speed, and fuel economy is to add a kicker motor. A VHF radio may not be essential if you are sticking just to Vancouver harbour. A cell phone will give you coverage within the harbour, but a VHF is certainly safer (it also gives weather advisories). A handheld VHF is handy, but I wouldn't recommend one for your main radio. I would buy a base unit that can monitor ch 16 as well as other channels at the same time. Do not skimp on the antenna that is what gives you added range when you need it most. How much of this stuff do you already have? Let us know, if you need suggestions for buying mounting, etc.

Good luck, and good fishing.

TheBigGuy
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
TheBigGuy said:
How much of this stuff do you already have? Let us know, if you need suggestions for buying mounting, etc.
TheBigGuy,

Thanks for the info.

I have a decent Lowrance depth sounder/fish finder (well, it doesn't really "find" them, just kinda points them out to me ;) )

I will be getting a Scotty 1114 or 1116 Propack downrigger (any advise - long or short boom?)

I will also be getting a portable VHF radio, but will also carry my cell.

I'm thinking a portable GPS might be handy to mark some points to return to that are producing fish. Having said that, is that really necessary given there are not a whole lot of spots that are hard to find the next time?

Good points on trolling with the 115. Gas consumption would be an issue. I have a friend with a little 8hp sumthin'. He offered to loan it to me, but I'm pretty sure I'll make an investment in a new merc 9.8 or such.

The other thing I need to get is a good mooching rod, but I'm following another thread on that matter.

Geez, after getting all this gear, I'll never be home; I'll either be on the chuck or the river. Last year was the first year with the boat, so I spent all of my boating time getting to know the river. This year, it'll be a bit of both.
 

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Hi, LL

Regarding the riggers, if you are planning on adding a kicker go with the longer arms. The extra length helps keep the cable out of the prop on sharp turns. That is even more important if you add a kicker. Extra length does put extra strain on where you mount it. You must have as strong mounting point for the extra torque.

The other equipment is more important if you are fishing other locations than just Vancouver. I have two hand held VHF units. They are nice to have. I use them when I am out on my 14 ft Lund and as a backup to my base unit. The range is very limited with hand helds. On a boat your size I would seriously recommend mounting a base unit. If you are planning on only fishing around the harbour a hand held would probably do you. The cost is almost the same for a hand held and a base unit. For the money a base unit is a far better investment for safety. The further from civilization you plan on traveling the more important a radio and GPS become. Hand helds may do for around Vancouver. If you are planning on going to the West Coast or the Mid or North Island, base units are really what you want. Any area that has fog requires a good GPS. Base units with map cartridge capabilities are the best. It is rarely foggy around Vancouver, so a GPS is not essential to fish here (just make sure you have a compass). Save your money on the hand helds and put it towards a good base model. I know they are more of a pain to wire and mount, but they are far more useful, and may save your life in an emergency.

Hope that helps.
 

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Hey,
I had a Lund Pro sport 1700 just like yours. As everyone has said it is great if the weather is good. I even crossed over to Thrasher rock a couple of times in mine. I also fished my Lund off the west coast of the Island.But you must watch the weather. If the wind picks up its time to get outta dodge even if you are in local waters. Last year I took a wave over the ass end just about 1 mile off Bowen. That was enough for me and I bought a Malibu 185. Way more freeboard and stern height. If you want a boat that will be good on nice weather days for the chuck and good on the river the Lund is your boat. If you really want to stay in the salt you might want to look around a bit.

Bigsvend
 

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Don't forget extra sunscreen when on the salt as well............the "rays" are way more intense and reflect off the salt particles much more so than in that dirty fresh water............

;D ;) ;D ;) ;D ;) :eek: ::)
 

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Hi All,
We're really getting down to the nitty gritty now. Lots of good suggestions. Not having much experience in the Van Harbour area, don't know if my advice counts, but a VHF in the boat is a necessity. Hand helds are great for short range, but if you need to reach out and touch someone, get a base or boat mounted system. I have had the 108" fiberglass whips in the past and currently am running a short stainless with the gain gizmo and it sure works well. Last weekend I got over 20 miles clear reception over hills and water. Far better than my *** antenna did.

Talk about GPS's. I've used an handheld Lorance in my boat for a few years and it was great for marking favorite spots and routes etc but took a lot of work to set it up. I have been running a plotter for the last couple trips and don't know how I ever got along without it. Remember the times you have got the riggers down and the bottoms coming up!! You turn away from shore and right on to a higher hump. The plotter shows you whats ahead. I think it is great. Saved me at least 2 balls last weekend. Charts are still a must along with a compass and paying attention to where you are and where you are going. Nothing more unsettling than being in the middle of f---ing nowhere when the fog moves in and not really knowing which way to go. I guess if we all go east we will hit land somewhere. but it is nice to have the plotter's chart to pinpoint location and direction to go.

Anyway, got to go. Will pick this up later. Good luck and tight lines.
 

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There's lots of good advice on this thread. However, some of the people on this thread are blowing the situation out of hand.

However, if you're going to fish around Vancouver, I would recommend the following.

1. You don't require a radio.
2. If you opt not to have a radio, then have auxiliary power--a kicker motor, and you should have a kicker regardless.
3. A handheld is MORE than sufficient for most areas around Vancouver---however, a permanent install with a wicked antenna is where it's at. A decent antenna mounted high enough off the water will get you some awesome range. A radio is NO substitute for common sense or good judgement.
4. GPS is a waste of money around Vancouver unless you intend to fish in the fog. More than half the charter vessels around the Vancouver area do not have GPS's...simply not required, you live here, you have plenty of other days to go fishing..and unless you can make the fish jump into your boat around Vancouver, you're either a fish hog or have screws loose..the fishing simply is NOT that good.
5. 12 foot Aluminum tubs with 10 horse motors used to go off the south end of Bowen, and the only safety equipment they had was a lifejacket-a bailer-and a set of oars. Pick your weather!!!!
6. Your boat is adequate for the waters around Vancouver. If it's too windy for your boat, and too rough, you're probably going to notice most other boats pack it in anyways. Observe your forecast and pay attention.
7. If you're not having fun, WHY are you boating/fishing out there?
8. Your lund is a nice boat, however, you could probably sell that boat for some good $$$, upsize some, and get more power, and a much more seaworthy boat which will open other options for your boating/fishing adventures on this coast. THEN you need a radio and a good chart plotter/GPS in the event that the fog comes in while you're on your getaway.
9. Study your charts, and you don't even need a depthsounder!!!!!!!
 
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