BC Fishing Reports banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right out of the shoots, thanks for the info I've gleaned just by lurking here. I am coming up to the town of Chilliwack with a group of fishing/drinking buddies. This will be the first time to BC for all of us. We're basically a carload of trout/steelhead bums from Idaho who love to flyfish. We will be getting in on 10/5 and staying through the 10th. From reading this and other boards, Fred’s Tackle is obviously our first stop.

My problem is, I usually put a lot more time and preparation into a trip like this, and I hate flying blind. For example, is it elbow to elbow fishing?

We want to spend time fishing for chums, coho, and springs, with no particular preference for any one species (we may whack one or two for the BBQ, but we're generally catch & release). Is this an Alaska-type catch fish until you're sick of it adventure or an Idaho fish 10 hours and if you are really, really good you might get to fight one or two steelhead type adventure?

All of us have considerable salmon and steelhead experience (well, one doesn't, but he is a pro trout guide for a living, so he'll probably still out fish us all), but we're completely new to BC. Any help you can provide would be appreciated.

Oh, yea, one more dumb little question. We typically swing/skate flies down here, but most of my salmon fishing has been done by stripping flies in. Is this more of a skate or strip type of fishing?

Thanks!

(PS, I have been lurking on several boards for a few months now, so don't take offense if you see this cut and pasted elseware. We need all the help we can get :wink: )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Well I can not give you any info on fly fishing I can say that if you are staying in Chilliwack the Vedder/Chilliwack River is a sure bet. In October you can catch Coho, springs and chum in the same spot. The fraser is another option if you would prefer to Bar Fish. Freds is a good place to stop when you get here, they will point you in the right direction. Also you can check out www.sharphooks.com for fishing locations. It has a database of a lot of fishing spots on our bigger rivers.

Cheers and enjoy your first trip to BC, it won't be your last :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
I'm assuming you're thinking of fishing the Chilliwack/Vedder River. The lower Vedder usually has the most "fly-fishable" water. By lower Vedder, I mean below the Vedder Crossing. Above the crossing, the river is known as the Chilliwack River, which has lots of bouldery pocket water which is much more easier to gear fish (IMHO).

I'm not sure what you mean by "skate" or "strip". Can you please describe this? When you say "skate", I'm thinking of "grease-line" presentations (full floating lines) with big skater patterns for steelhead. I typically use a sinking tip system and let the fly drift (swing) down with the current. There are some areas where you can cast and retrieve (strip retrieve) for coho - this will be in the slack water where there is little or no current. It's not uncommon to let the fly finish the drift, then pick up a fish while stripping in for the next cast.

Also - the Harrison River is a great river to fly fish. It has a very slow current, and guys typically use sinking tips or slow sinking clear "slime" lines. This fishery is typically cast and retrieve as the drift is very slow. However, in October, the Harrison should be loaded with big chums and coho should be there too.

When the fish are in - the fishing on the fly can be hot! However, the Vedder does get very busy - and mixing gear with fly techniques isn't always very easy. Just be prepared to do some hiking around to find some decent spots.

Good luck... :wink: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,386 Posts
There will be no shortage of places to fish either on the Harrison or the Chilliwack. Yes, it can get busy, but it sure isn't shoulder to shoulder.....Both rivers are pretty big . You can walk most of the Chilliwack/Vedder (water levels permitting) but you would be much better served by the use of a boat in the Harrison. Most of the Harrison is inaccessible by foot except for some areas around the mouth and a quarter mile upstream.
The fishing in the local rivers is "water dependant" in that if we have a good rain for a few days the fishing will be really hot as long as the flow stays clear. Too much rain and some of the local streams will"go out" and be pretty unfishable. The Harrison system, however, is not generally affected by these conditions.
Good idea to stop at Fred's and also wouldn't be a bad idea to take a guided trip for a day...I would say success would almost be guaranteed that time of the year. Lots of big springs, coho and some early chum, however the bulk of the chum run appear s later in the month and into November...................Good luck,..Ortho 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Good luck to you guys.You'll be hitting the river at the perfect time and feel you should be all good.This is the best site for friendly helpful responses so please try back when you need to.Fred's tackle is a friggin candy store for fisherman.I stop there even when I don't need anything and walk out with something.Great serevice there and very eager to help out. I'm pretty sure you'll be into some nice fish and alot of them once you get to know a few things about the river.No steelhead though.


Hotrod



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, I appreciate the help! When I was talking about skating flies, I was talking about the greased line presentation you described. A better way of asking the question would have been: is there enough current that you are swinging flies or is it primarily a slack water presentation. The reason for that question is one of my setups is a spey rod with Rio Versi-tip line which is a bear to strip retrieve because of the connections (but it is awesome for swinging).

One other stupid question. I have never caught a white Chinook in my life. Are they any good to eat? All of the Chinook we see in Idaho are red.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,386 Posts
Well, this topic of white vs. red has been discussed on numerous occaisions, however my opinion hasn't changed. Either of these fish when caught "FRESH"....(chrome sides and sea lice) are delicious. They can be baked,steamed BBQ or smoked with equal results.
Sometimes (maybe this year) the fish sit in the lower end of the rivers waiting for the rain and they discolour and tend to go soft quickly......The slime they have for protection from disease gives them a bad rap at times, as both species have a definitive odour.when they are removed from the water.......The other question often comes up when do I keep and when should I release.....Fact is, I just feel the fish. If they are really firm, they will taste fine. If they are soft and mushy....time for a quick release........My 2 cents worth........Ortho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
OK! For the most part, I would say for the Vedder River that you will most likely be fishing flowing water. There are some slack water areas that will hold coho which are great for cast and retrieve. However, by October, the rains might make these areas unfishable as the water level rises too high to access these areas. My flyfishing "mentor" mainly fishes his spey rod. I still like to use my single hander - as I can do both methods easily (and I don't have a spey rod...yet). The Vedder is quite a small river, and I've never had a problem with casting distance. However, I agree that a spey rod gives you an advantage with respect to swinging flies.

Another great river to try is the Squamish River. This river is located north of Vancouver on the way to Whistler. By October, there should be some fresh chum in that system. By fresh, I mean silver! Also, the Squamish has a very nice flow that works great for the fly! The only thing is that if you're staying in Chilliwack, the Squamish will be a bit of a trek while the Vedder will be at your doorstep. Just a thought though...

As for reds vs. whites - I would suggest that Ortho has provided some good advice (as he usually does). I have hooked chinook (we call them springs) on the fly and they are absolute brutes! I prefer the smaller jacks (6 - 8 pounders) or coho on the fly. I always get a bit worried about my rod when I've got a big 20 - 30 pound spring on the end of my line. An 8 weight system as a minimum would be my suggestion here.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Here's a picture of a Vedder white spring. Actually, this is quite a hog! This fish is too dark to consider retaining (unless you want to have a supply of pet food). :lol: :lol:



On the other hand, here's a photo of a nice pair or spring jacks that I caught last year. These turned out to be reds! Chrome bright and perfect for the BBQ! :wink:



So - there you have it. Dark fish vs. chromers. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,732 Posts
Is that a flatfish your casting magicion ? Cheers Marko
 
G

·
Kind of new to fly fishing, so i am prone to asking. What does swinging the fly mean? Everyone seems so be talking so im just wondering. Thanks to anyone that replies.
 
G

·
No salmon fishing for me this year. All i have is a 5 weight. Hopefully next year i could buy an 8. Good luck to all of you who can though. 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Is that a flatfish your casting magicion ? Cheers Marko
Flatfish? Heh - that would be really fun to cast! Actually, the fly is a pink "epoxy" minnow that I tied for pinks that year. The body is marabou coated with Anglers Choice Soft Body. I then place the fly on an epoxy drier for 24 hours. I was trying my usual patterns when I decided to just try a pink fly and I nailed the two jacks within about 20 minutes of each other. My buddy also landed a 25+ chromer on a pink fly also. Here's a photo of the fly:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,732 Posts
Cool pics ! I'm assuming you we using a sinking leader ? Looking forward to fishing this weekend ,

the weather should be great. Marko 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Flies

Speaking of flies.....

I spent last night tying up a dozen or so fuchsia flies. I don't have a name for them (and they aren't my invention), but they are basically dumbell-eyed ESLs with rabit strip tails. Tonight I plan to tie another dozen or so in chartreus, and then use the same colors and some white bucktail for clousers. Any other fly suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
fineangler said:
Kind of new to fly fishing, so i am prone to asking. What does swinging the fly mean? Everyone seems so be talking so im just wondering. Thanks to anyone that replies.
If you've fished wet flies, you have done it. It's just the standard down and across wet fly presentation (generally distinguished from giving your fly movement by stripping it in or going for a drag free drift with a nymph/indicator type setup).

Thanks for all the help, guys. 13 days, and I can't wait.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top