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Probably going up the vedder later this week, was wondering if there was any tips. This would be my first time and I would at least like to get a bite if not a fish. Just wondering what kind of rod i should be using, what kind of setup, and what kind of bait. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
 

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i would sudgest if u know how to use it, a baitcaster with a medium action 10-11ft baitcasting rod. Load it up with 15lb test maxima,trilene. Go buy some "dink" floats and some 1/4" pencil lead. #10 barrel swivles and size 1 red gamikatsu hooks. 10-12lb test leader line. Those are the basics, i'll let the rest of the forum elaborate! :2cents:
 

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here is a short piece from one of Riwarts many explanations of the short float method
hope you dont mind Ribwart

ribwart said:
So how does short floating work? The golden rule is the length from your float to your weight, (not to your hook, but from float to weight), should be less than the depth of the water you are fishing by at least a foot...in fact usually a shorter float than that is better as you want your hook floating above the fish's heads...not disturbing them or spooking them at all...enticing them to strike, not striking them.
You may have noticed how salmon swim near the bottom, and when you walk up to a pool they see you and swim a bit further away....well this would logically mean that the salmon can see things above them and around them and react to them right? So the theory behind the short floating technique is to present your attractant, be it bait or a spinner, or a peice of wool that looks like some salmon eggs floating in the water, in such a way that the fish sees it, reacts to it swims over, and bites it. Fish don't have hands to inspect items that they are curious about, they use their mouths to check things out. Therefore by presenting your wares to the fish in such a way that entices them to inspect what you are offering, you are trully participating in and honing the skills of river drift fishing...you have tricked the salmon or steelhead into striking your presentation because it wanted to, not because you hit it on the head with your weight and it accidentally swam into your hook...when you fish with a "short float" and the fish strikes your hook, you will have trully experienced the "sport" in sportfishing and will learn that there is a science and methodology to catching these beautiful fish on our rivers that requires much more skill than just dragging your hook along the bottom and hoping for the best.
You bring in factors like what depth the fish are precisely at, how much weight to use to present your offering at the right speed, and what angle you need to approach the fish from so as to slow or speed up your presentation in such a way as to entice them to bite. Suddenly what color jig or wool or spinner you use becomes a part of the challenge.
I know this report was for Salmon fishing but the same priciples apply
 

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I don't mind at all britguy...

Bobu, steelhead season is a tough season to get started fishing rivers...but that doesn't mean you won't get one, just be patient, the rewards are definitely worth it...

Your "depth", meaning float to swivel, will vary depending on the type of bait or terminal item you will be using. Try to imagine how your terminal item will "sit" in the water...IE: Is it heavier like a jig or blade, or is it a more buoyant item like wool or corkies or tiny roe bags...where will it sit in relation to your weight, and in relation to the bottom...

This will help you determine the right depth to fish...you will want to be close to the bottom, but not so close that your float is bobbing up and down like mad as your weight bounces along the rocks...you want your hook to be in the bottom two feet of water most of the time...

You will also want to think carefully about where your drifts should start and how far upriver you need to cast to give your terminal gear time to sink into the zone before it gets to the fish...otherwise you will just be swinging it way over their heads, and way too fast...

Concentrate on getting your gear to "dead drift" as much as possible. Once you have the right combination of depth and weight, your float should dead drift straight up and down through the water, and will seem to be moving ever so slightly slower than the water it is in...placing your casts correctly will play a big part in achieving good drifts...

As you learn to "read" the water more effectively you will start to get the hang of it...

Let us know if you have more questions, there are many great posts in this forum with tips and techniques from a great deal of knowledgeable members...read through them and enjoy the learning process!

rib
 
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