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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok here is loaded topic. So before we go too far, please don't get into the ethics gongshow.

This is a question based on, I guess you could say, mechanics.

If you're doing the cast and drift thing on the fly rod for SALMON. What percent of hits or caught fish will be due to flossing and how many will be due to actual strikes?

Everyone assumes that flyfishing is the better alternative (or at least that's my interpretation) but I have to assume I'm snagging a few of them.
 

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I would say that alot of the "hits" on the downswing with the current are going to be "flossed" depending on what depth you are fishing and what you are using. I would assume if you were fishing on the surface or just below the surface (top 2 feet) you wouldnt be flossing, as opposed the fishing with heavy sink tip and a weighted fly. Unless it is a large take, I would assume that the fish didnt bite. I have had a few times were I am starting to strip and find a fish on that I didnt even feel. The only way I know for sure that the fish bite is when I am stripping in against the current and have the take. Maybe some more "experienced" fly anglers can comment on this as I have only been at it 2 years now :cheers:

Dan
 

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I think the distinction comes from how the angler fishes their fly...By definition flossing basically means getting the line caught in the fishes teeth and keeping it there until the hook swings into the side of its head.

Mechanics was a really good way of putting it. If an angler is "swimming" their fly, under tension, with the fly fishing downstream first and in a relatively straight line, that is one particular way in which fish will be fair hooked, likely none would be flossed.

On the other hand if the angler were mending thier line in such a way that they could get their leader swinging horizontally through a run, then likely many of their fish would be flossed.

As with gear fishing, it inevitably comes down to the technique employed by the angler more than anything else.

We control our drifts, whether we have a centerpin or a flyrod in our hands. We enact this control to get the drift we desire. Thus our technique is what matters.

With flyfishing Bronjuan, I would say less fish would be caught flossing. First off it's probably harder to floss fish with a fly line, and secondly, anyone who wanted to take up flyfishing wouldn't likely want to learn those techniques when they can do it the right way.

It is arguably easier to more accurately control your drifts with a drift rod, thus, I would say the percentages of flossing occurring be it purposefully or not, is higher with the gear.

I say this as a gear and fly angler.

:2cents:

rib
 

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I think for me it depends on the type of water I am fishing. I could probably floss a fish every time if they are stacked up in fast shallow water and I swing a fly through it. I like to stick to deeper slower water and its seems like the fish are caught ie bite rather than flossed.
 

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There's a so many different factors to consider that it would take pages to discuss. I'll give a couple. One factor may be how long fish have been holding in a piece of water that you are fishing. For example, a slack pool off the main current of the Vedder/Chilliwack that's loaded with stale fish that have had a ton of gear thrown at them will not likely strike. You can keep drifting your fly through the crowd with a sink tip or sinking line, and yes, eventually you'll most likely floss or snag a few.

Another factor might be species related. For exaple, in a pink year, I can hardly drift my fly without one of those aggressive buggers taking a smack at it. I've even left the raggedy remains of my muddler trying to figure out at what point they'll stop hitting my fly...but sometimes even a hook with the smallest remnants of Krystal Flash or Flashabou on it will still trigger numerous strikes. I haven't experienced sockeye to be very willing biters on the other hand, and found that the ones I've caught have often been flossed.

If you really want to, you can floss fish with any technique...it's just I haven't met very many flyfishermen who have gone out of their way to intentionally do so. Heck, it goes against the very nature of the sport...using your creativity to get a fish to take an artificial fly as something it naturally eats...although in the case of salmon and steelhead, one may argue they strike more out of aggression than appetite. The most exciting part for me is the anticipation and then the feeling of that strike...everything else is fun, but I could live with just the memory of the strike and first few headshakes. That pretty much rules out flossing for me as a sport.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How do you tell if it's been flossed?? When fishing for pinks, I hit two in the front of the maxilla (obv bite) one on the gill cover (missed strike? missed strike with snag of fish or its neighbor on hook set?), one in the hump. These were all in the tail outs of a run. I just let it bob and weave in the current for a few seconds before the retrieve and these were the results.

Just wondering what's happening... :-[
 

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This discussion has been held in one form or another many time here, but simply put, I don't believe it is anywhere near as easy to floss a fish with a fly line as it is with gear. to present a fly near the bottom (where the fish are holding) a fly fisher needs to cast quartering downstream and mend the line upstream to give the fly time to sink. Then the angler follows the fly downstream, keeping the fly under a bit of tension. This keeps the fly at the point (the first thing downstream). Gear anglers will maintain that the fly angler merely needs to mend downstream to let the line lead the fly and thus floss the fish. Unfortunately, when a downstream mend starts to drag a fly downstream and across, the fly (and the line) will immediately start to lift from the bottom; taking it out of the strike zone. I have snagged fish on the retrieve as well, but usually chum stacked three deep and not much else.
 

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bronjuan said:
How do you tell if it's been flossed?? When fishing for pinks, I hit two in the front of the maxilla (obv bite) one on the gill cover (missed strike? missed strike with snag of fish or its neighbor on hook set?), one in the hump. These were all in the tail outs of a run. I just let it bob and weave in the current for a few seconds before the retrieve and these were the results.

Just wondering what's happening... :-[
Tailouts stacked with humpies are: 1) getting towards the shallow end, 2) packed with fish bodies, and 3) have a current moving through them. If you drift your fly across this condition, you may get a few hits from the cruisers before your fly inevitably gets to the stacked spawners and the current tension on your drifting line sets enough tension for the sharp tip of your hook to eventually find a piece of humpy skin or gill plate.

I would suggest not letting your line drift over dark stale fish in current, and concentrate on the active ones. Vary your depth, retrieve, and fly to find what provokes a strike.
 

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Yeah what they said ;D


Some great fishermen giving great responses, hard to add anything to that :cheers:
 
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