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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I often get asked "why do you always use fleurocarbon".......?. Well, I don't always use this type of leader, but when fishing subsurface in clear water conditions, I have found over the years that is does seem to produce better than my regular maxima ultragreen. There are plenty of different brands of fleurocarbon leader but they all have some thing in common. They have a very slow sinking ability, and if they are frayed, they will break, and if you don't spit on the line when tying knots, it will fray and break (especially roe loops)...It must be checked regularly as it is prone to getting rock nicks and frayed edges from other bottom structure, and it is very difficult to tie if your vision is less than perfect, especially in low light conditions......I would be interested to hear from others on their experiences with this product or others that perform better......................Ortho 8)
 

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Oct 1/08

Ortho

I have tried several brands and have the same experiences as you - even had a hard time tying knots period with some brands

However I have found Seagar to be better than most and have been using it almost exclusively lately - Also when I use it as a tippet material I have been pleased with the turn-over I am getting on presentation from the Skagit to salmon on the north end of Vanc Isl.

Oakey
 

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fishortho said:
There are plenty of different brands of fleurocarbon leader but they all have some thing in common. They have a very slow sinking ability, and if they are frayed, they will break,
I have fished fluoro in lakes due to the higher sink rate compared to mono. Perhaps it was just my imagination but i found it to sink faster. When fishing rivers for salmon i usually use just plain mono because i find it to be durable if there are a few frays. I also find that mono has a slight bungee effect to it and if fishing for larger species or you find the fish are really hammering your offering it can help to not break them off. With that said I do believe fluoro has a place in low water conditions or when fishing saltwater. I would not even think about fishing mono on the flats but to be honest i think that might just be more of a mental thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My experiences with the flyrod in crystal clear lakes was rather dramatic...No fish for and hr. changed the leader and caught 4 fish in an hr.....Like I said earlier, I still like the mono for it's abraive resistant qualities, but thr fleuro. does sink and makes certain types of fishing more rewarding.......just gotta be careful withthe knots.............Ortho 8)
 

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Flourocarbon sinks faster do to the fact that it is thinner in diameter. This gives it less surface tension allowing it to sink alot quicker. Just remember to wet your knots or you will be sorry.
 

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flyguy said:
Flourocarbon sinks faster do to the fact that it is thinner in diameter. This gives it less surface tension allowing it to sink alot quicker. Just remember to wet your knots or you will be sorry.
Although fluorocarbon is thinner in diameter than mono of the same test, the reason it sinks is that it is 1.7 times the density of mono. Very light (thin) mono like a 7x (2 lb) will float when fishing a dry fly. Fluoro of the same diameter will not float, but rather sink and pull the fly down with it.
 

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The only time I don't fish flouro is when I'm using a bait loop, which isn't very often. It is much less visible under the surface, thus increasing hook ups in water that has 2 ft or more of vis. I don't know why people don't fish with flouro, why would you give the fish another reason not to hit your offering by letting them see your line. :hmmm:

Tight Lines, Nates
 

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Have used the Seaguar(10#) for driftfishing/floatfishing in clear conditions.Landed one or two fish with out any problems.Now have some Berkley Vanish that I've heard is crap but have not had a fish on it to verify.Probably will go back to Seaguar, as the feel and look is better than The Vanish.
 

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I agree on all points in your topic starter Ortho...except I too find it sinks more quickly than mono...might depend on the brand, I don't know. I'll add that as with others here, I also have found the seaguar to be my preference...I avoid using it drift fishing in rivers unless conditions demand it...ie: the water is very slow and clear and the fish are getting spooky, then it's time to switch...otherwise usually the ultragreen is enough.

Lots of great points from the rest here too...
 

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floro works best for sinking line techniques. For casting a dry fly I use only regular tippet since it doesn't tend to pull the fly down as much. I have been told that floro has a very long life so there is not as much worry about keeping your tippets "fresh" as is the case with regular lines. I have begun the process of writing a date on my regular tippet so I know to change it out after a few yrs. the old tippet breaks off too easily. :)
 
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