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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
want to flyfish for sox, but I have never fished for sockeye, fly or otherwise. What flies should I use? How should I present the flies (fast sink, floating, etc.)? Suggestions on where to fish (I will be spey fishing unless there is a good reason not to) will be appreciated.
 

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Went out yesterday to the Harrison withthe wife. We were fishing by the Rail bridge, the wife drowning worms while I was fly fishing for cutties. I was using a muddler and hooked into a nice Sockeye with my 5wt. Thought at first I hooked into the biggest cuttie around, you can imagine my surprise :shock: when I get it close to shore and see that it was a sock, well it took off like a rocket and broke my tippet after a brief but great fight. Sockeye one me Zero.

I was using my clear intermediate sink line with a seven foot leader and three feet of 6X tippet but I would not recommend that for sockeye fishing :wink:

Ross
 
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Professori,
As a general rule, sockeyes travel close to shore especially if the central current is fast and deep, and they seldom follow a fly. You must've heard the term" flossing". It is best practiced in a shallower riffle close to the shore with heavy sink tips 300-400 gr for a single hand rod, 15-25' of t14 on a spey, pref. attached to a skagit head. The fish are very tight to the bottom, therefore in order to instantly bring the fly down, you would cast slightly upriver with a big mend. (Most of the legally landed fish are hooked in the outside corner of the mouth.)By doing so, you greatly increase the chance of foul hooking them as well, there is a fine line between "flossing" and snagging.
As for flies, don't be picky, you'll be loosing many flies on the bottom, short shank bait hooks size 1/0 with some pink yarn will do.
Good luck
 

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Apparently, sockeye have lock jaw until they reach their home stream and that Is the reason they are caught legally in the Harrison and the Chilli/Vedder on occasion. Most of the fish in the Fraseer system are heading way up the Fraser and sad to say they don't readily chase a fly. They can be caught with the rigging set out above and have been flossed/caught in the Skeena system for years using a 4-6 ft. leader and a size 1/0 hook with any colour yarn (helps you find the hook when you sharpen)...See no reason you cannot set up similar gear for the Fraser......Be prepared to lose some gear if you are using a sink line. It will wrap around every stick and stump and large rock in the river, unlike the mono/braid lines of the 'bouncers whose lines also tend to bounce off these obstructions.
Ortho 8)
 

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Took two socks on the Harrison the other day using pink maribou bead-head flies..Basically the same ones I had left over from pinks last year...I only had my floating line with me due to last minute scrambling...
Just up from the mud line at the Fraser /Harrison Confluence......First fly on came off quickly(didn't use my glasses to tie it on)..Second fly nailed a small doe who must have been lost .. She attacked the fly from below and spent 3 minutes going crazy...
Socks go for hot pink in the salt water, so I figured what the heck,,Harrison waters are clear enough for color to be a major factor...Worked for me...Wasn't flossing as I was casting straight out the back of the boat,not drifting with the current...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. Tried the Fraser today. No luck (didn't get there until 7:15 AM). On the Harrison the wind was blowing about 30 knots straight into my face, so gave up trying to heave a line into it after about a 1/2 hour. Did see 4 or 5 sockeye rolling so they were there.
 

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Harrison fish will BITE almost anything small and red in colour, the only place my wife will fish cause she can't cast lol.
 
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