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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys
Long time lurker, first time poster.
I was hoping to get some info regarding drift fishing locations in the Langley/Fort Langley areas
of the Fraser River.

My buddy lives in the Fort and just bought a new boat, problem is I have rarely fished below the Vedder
and he fishes primarily sturgeon.
We are hoping someone can maybe suggest an area that is good for bottom bouncing
Spring , Pink and Sockeye in that area of Langley.

Is there maybe a Lower Fraser "Grassy or Pegleg that we can hit,

We've fished Derby Reach from shore, is mid river worth checking out ?

Thanks for your help
 

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very slow.....lots of water......tough for bbing or float fishing for that matter. when the pinks are in i always check out the maple ridge areas......
 

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You will most likely need to try bar fishing the lower river. You need a gravel bar to bounce a weight along the bottom and a decent current to as you say bottom bounce. The upper river has very few bars showing right now as well due to high water.
 

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I hate newbies looking for information....gimme, gimme, gimme......brutal!!! :D :p :D ;)




Get out there sir!! Keep me posted how things go....you know where I'll be if ya wanna connect for a pint. :cheers:
 

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I hate newbies looking for information....gimme, gimme, gimme......brutal!!! :D :p :D ;)




Get out there sir!! Keep me posted how things go....you know where I'll be if ya wanna connect for a pint. :cheers:
Damn, Scott. You beat me to it. ;-)

Evil One, you need to let us know a little more about the boat you have as well. We can't make recommendations for where to use your boat unless we know what yah got.

Cheers
 

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You can definitely drift fish just about anywhere in the Fraser. BBing is not possible due to the low current below the Vedder mouth. If you want to Floss, head above Mission.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think Pippen may be a little owly from all the dissin on his fav new pink shirt.
(real men wear camo and jorts)
 

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You can definitely drift fish just about anywhere in the Fraser. BBing is not possible due to the low current below the Vedder mouth. If you want to Floss, head above Mission.
Totally forgot about the lack of current, thanks for the reminder Bert
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Damn, Scott. You beat me to it. ;-)

Evil One, you need to let us know a little more about the boat you have as well. We can't make recommendations for where to use your boat unless we know what yah got.

Cheers
17' jet, with draft taps and pig roasting facilities
 

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17' jet, with draft taps and pig roasting facilities
Cool, as you fly up the river, stop by the old 18" Hewie O/B Jet with "Finaddict" on the side and slice me off a couple of shavings of pulled pork and a cold pint of Stella.

Try this as a starter. The infomration is readily accessible Evil one. All you have to do is surf the forums and search the right words.

Credit for this goes to to Ian Forbes who wrote this article in FishBC Forum a few years back..........

The Mission bridge marks roughly the upper limit of tidal affected water. It is also a boundary for some fishing regulations. There is a public boat ramp just upstream from the bridge on the Mission side of the river. There are several good spots from the bridge to the famous Hatzic sturgeon hole, but few can beat this well known location for giant sturgeon. Right in front of the Mission Bells sturgeon can be seen rolling or jumping throughout the season. Hooking one of the monsters is a lifetime thrill. It is all catch and release angling. Although log booms are often tied up in this area, cutthroat trout and salmon often hold near the mouth of Hatzic Slough. Cutthroat are notorious for moving in and out of the slough. Slaughter House Bar and Wades Creek Bar are between Hatzic and Dewdney. Access is by walking a short distance along the **** from Hyde-Buker road. There is a boat ramp in the Dewdney Nature Park at the mouth of Nicomen Slough. Access is off McKamey Road. Nicomen Slough is one of the great cutthroat locations along the Fraser. They treat it like a lake and are constantly moving in and out of the slough. They often follow the salmon heading for Norrish Creek and spawn in the creek themselves. Coho are taken by trolling or casting in the slough. The whole area along the Fraser near the mouth of Nicomen Slough and Strawberry Island is excellent for salmon and trout. There is also a deep hole that produces a few sturgeon.

Just upstream from the Nicomen Slough is the mouth of the Vedder/Chilliwack River and the Sumas Canal. This is a natural resting area for all salmonids. The Vedder produces some of the largest runs of salmonids in the whole Fraser Valley. They all hold below the river's entrance prior to moving upstream to spawn. There is a summer and Fall Chinook fishery, autumn runs of coho and chum, and winter run steelhead. Following the salmon are cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden and a few resident rainbows. Sockeye salmon also migrate past the mouth of the Vedder from mid summer to early fall. Unfortunately, there is no shore access to the mouth of the Vedder and it can only be reached by boat. The southern shoreline is within the McGillivray Game Preserve and has no access. Just above the river's entrance is the lower end of Bowman's Mill bar, and access is by boat only. This is an excellent location for salmon and trout. River current and high water changes the location of the sand bars in this area from year to year so they have to be re-learned each season. There is a rough access boat launch through Cattermole Timber's log sort yard (Sumas Log sort yard) off Industrial way. Permission is necessary from the office before driving through the yard. 4WD is recommended to launch a boat over the gravel at the Big Eddy Bar, and there is limited parking. Just upstream from the log sort is Old Orchard road (off Industrial Way) where there is another rough gravel boat launch used by car toppers and small trailers. Turn into a driveway just after the sharp corner on Old Orchard Road. This accesses a gravel bar that will be covered in water during freshet. 4WD can be necessary to launch a boat at certain times. And again, there is limited parking. Across the Fraser from the log sort is the upper end of Nicomen Island. Access to the river is from Johnson Road where it crosses Hwy 7, then onto Nicomen Island Trunk Road, then onto McDonald Road. Follow McDonald Road to the end and over the **** to the river. On the same side of the river and farther upstream at Deroche is another boat ramp near the end of Tremblay Island Road. Turn onto Athey Road just before the Deroche bridge over Nicomen Slough, follow Tremblay Road to the **** road, turn right and then left after a short distance. It is a rough gravel launch suitable for cartoppers and small trailers. Wingdam Bar is downstream from the boat launch is one of the more popular spots on the north side.

Unquestionably the most popular boat ramp along the river is at Island 22 near Chilliwack. There is ample parking and a very busy regional camp grounds nearby. Access is off Cartmell Road near the end of Young Road. There is a daily boat launch fee or a seasons pass. Island 22 is central to most of the better fishing locations. Queen's Island and Gallagher Bar are right across the river. Grassy Island is just downstream and there is a group of small islands scattered upstream and down. The mouth of the Harrison is just a short distance upstream on the north shore of the Fraser. Migrating salmon constantly move through this area and hold briefly along the bars and islands. When a run comes through it seems like every second person has a fish on. Although many anglers bring boats there is fair fishing right in front of the campsite. There are two very rough boat launch sites for cartop boats or small trailers further upstream from Island 22 and off Ballam Road. The Ballam Bar and Peg-leg Wilsons offer fair fishing from shore, but parking is limited and 4WD might be necessary as it is over loose river gravel. Another rough boat launch is located at the end of Jesperson Road and then onto Carey Road. Follow Carey Road over the **** to the gravel boat ramp. Jesperson's is at the bottom end of Greyell Island. Trout and salmon can be found anywhere along Greyell Island and slough.

The mouth of the Harrison River is a magnet for all salmonids. Cutthroat trout move through the area constantly, and the Harrison system has runs of five Pacific salmon species along with steelhead and Dolly Varden. Dollies are more numerous in the Harrison/Lillooet system than in most other Fraser tributaries. Sturgeon hold in the deep pools in the Fraser below the Harrison and dine on decaying salmon when they are flushed out of the Harrison's tributaries after spawning. There are runs of sockeye in Weaver Creek and the Birkenhead, and the Lillooet has some of the earliest spring running Chinook. Boat access on the Harrison is at Kilby Park in Harrison Bay. There is fair fishing for cutthroat from shore along the bay. Turn onto School Road at Harrison Bay and follow the signs to Kilby Park. Calamity Point, where the Harrison meets the Fraser, is a place to avoid in any small boat.

Continuing on the north side of the river, there is access to several bars and sloughs off hwy 7 on Cameron Road. Turn off Cameron Road for access to the river on Limbert Road and Hamilton Road. Across the river on the south side is the Gill Bar, McGrath Bar and Ferry Island Bar. Ferry Island bar is in a park directly downstream from the Agassiz-Rosedale bridge. Gill Bar is off the end of Gill Road that intersects with Camp Road. It is possible to carry a car top boat to the water at Gill Bar.

Upstream from the bridge on the Agassiz side is First Nations Indian reserve and white people might not be welcome. There was access off Whelpton Road and over the **** to Bridge Road. There is the remains of an old boat ramp there. On the south side of the Fraser at Popkum there is access to the river off Julseth Road (5 km east of exit #135) and Halvorsen Road. This is a lovely piece of water that is excellent for cutthroat trout. The Fraser splits into several channels and it looks more like a small stream.

Continuing upstream on the south side, the next major fishing location is Herrling Island. There is an exit off hwy 1 to the island. The road winds down under the railway and onto the island over a gravel bar. It could be covered in water during freshet. There are several rough tracks through the island and it is a popular spot for off road vehicles. With a 4WD truck, or occasionally high clearance 2WD, it is possible to drive to the river and launch a car top boat. Fishing can be quite good all along the island. Cutthroat trout can be found anywhere along Cattermole Slough between Herrling Island and the south shore.

The next fair access upstream from Herrling Island is the Cheam View bar. Access is from the west bound Hwy 1 only. So, if traveling east it is necessary to take the Laidlaw exit #153, then cross under the freeway and back onto Hwy 1 westbound. From there it is about 4 km to an un-marked exit off the freeway. Follow this rough road downstream and parallel to the railway tracks to the old Cheam View Station and park at the end of the road. Cross the tracks and hike down a steep bank to the bar. This is a great location for all salmon species, and especially Chinook. Gold Dredge Bar is upstream from Cheam View. Take the same exit #153 but turn right onto Laidlaw Road and park about 200 m further along. Cross the tracks and hike the **** over Gold Dredge slough and onto the bar. Across the river on the north side is Johnson's Slough. Access is from Johnson's Slough Rest Stop. All this area from Herrling Island to Hope can be very windy.

Access to Hunter Creek Bar, Bulger Road Bar and St Elmo Road Bar is off hwy exit #160 at Laidlaw. Follow St Elmo Road (Old Yale rd) downstream for about 5 km and through the Ohamil Indian reserve (Shxwowhamel First Nations) to a gravel road turnaround at the end. It is a short walk to the river. For the Bulger Road bar take the same route on St Elmo road but only for 1.6 km and follow the narrow Bulger road to the river. There is space for about two or three vehicles. It could be possible to launch a small boat there but the boulders along shore are large. For access to the Hunter Creek bar, park at the rest stop and hike along Hunter Creek and under the highway bridge to the Fraser River. It is about 300 meters on a reasonable trail. Fishing is better during higher water when salmon migrate closer to shore.

Floods Bar and Silverhope Creek Bar access is off hwy exit #165. When traveling east take the Floods Hope overpass over the highway, then right onto Floods Hope Road for about one km. Turn left onto Floods Road, then left again after the tracks onto Yale Road. Follow Yale Rd to the end (about 1.2 km) and hike down to the river through some private property. This is not suitable for a boat launch because the trail is steep. For access to the Silverhope Bar follow Yale Road upstream to the Bristol Island intersection where it becomes Tom Berry Road. Continue along Tom Berry Road until just before the bridge over Silverhope Creek, then turn left down a gravel road to the pollution control centre. Park near there and hike along the trail to the creek mouth.
The Hope area has access in a few locations: at the mouth of the Coquihalla River, just below the highway bridge and across the river on the Landstrom Road bar. To reach the Ferry landing bar and the Coquihalla bar it's necessary to right on Coquihalla St, then left through a residential area. There is access down to the river across the huge gravel bar at the mouth of the Coquihalla River. Landstrom Road has been eroded away by the Fraser and access is limited and dangerous

Now go out and do a little exploring and let us know when you get one ;-)
 

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Keep in mind this information was 'published' a few years ago and access to certain areas may have changed. For example, the road to Herrling Island is no longer accessible, it is blocked by a gate. A lot of this information looks to be gleaned from the Eileen Maguire book Fishing Fever.
 

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Evil one...you should do alright for pinks fishing out of the boat in the lower fraser...areas around maple ridge can be good enough for some decent days, look for schooling/porpoising pinks, (which will most often be closer to shore) and anchor. We have had some decent days anchoring just offshore, (away from the crowds on the banks of course), and casting towards shore with spoons and flies...water depth and speed will play a role, particularly if your flyfishing, so you will probably find that shallower areas next to shore will be the most productive spots to fish when the pinks are porpoising, this will concentrate them more and increase your chances.

You can also anchor right over top of the lanes that the schools are traveling in deeper water and do alright, but you may need to move around more to stay on top of them and enjoy more consistent action.

You won't need to bottom bounce for pinks around langley area, just chucking spoons and spinners will do, in fact it will produce much better than bottom bouncing.

The lower fraser, (langley/fort area you asked about), is not conducive to bottom bouncing, and efforts to catch springs and sockeye this way will not be effective, but you will be able to have some good days casting at pinks.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Appreciate the info Finaddict, but thats a little further upriver than I'm looking
Grassy, Herling, Laidlaw etc is where I usually fish
 
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