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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It's easy to learn to fly cast; more difficult to catch something. Investing in a lesson or two will get you on the right track from the beginning and will pay dividends. If you teach yourself to cast it is very easy to pick up bad habits which are difficult to lose later on. Other than that, it's not rocket science. Still a rod and reel , line and lure. You don't say if you'll be fishing lakes or rivers or both. You may need a couple of different outfits if you are targeting those Charlie Lake pike as well as fishing the Peace river.

For some reason the board put this post before the OP. Maybe a mod can correct this?
 

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So I ask myself.....stick with what works, or learn something new? how hard is it to learn how to fly fish? what are the pro's and cons of fly fishing?

Not looking for a debate, but rather good educational input from those of you that learned how to, and are you happy with your results.

Thank you,

Ben,
Fort St. John
 

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im pretty much in the same boat as you. i used to use spinning tackle back when i was younger with my dad and such. a few years ago i started up fishing again but this time into a bait caster. and now for this season i've started to get into the fly. and i tell ya. i've spent more time with that rod in my hand than my levelwind. its fastly taking over and i just want to learn and get better. fly fishing is so much more involved and even if you arent catching much at some periods of time. atleast you still get to develope your cast and fiddle around on the water for a bit. i've noticed that its more intimidating than anything, i was a little worried at first. but you dont have to be able to cast like a pro to catch a fish. I hooked a small trout on my first outing and my cast has only gotten better since. There are tons of people on this forum and others that will give you great pointers and there are already threads on here and others to help you get started.
here's one ive visited recently that offered some good tips: http://www.fishingwithrod.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=24406.0
 

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I've been fly fishing for about 7 months now, started out in the exact same spot as you guys. If you can get past how difficult it looks, set aside everything you think you would have to do, it is an easy thing to get into. Do a youtube on how to fly cast and go to you local tackle shop and see if they offer any lessons or seminars, both sources are great at getting into the game.

As far as pros and cons go, more pros than cons, like more pure enjoyment out of casting a fly and catching a fish on a fly that you so delicately placed on the water, only to see it explode seconds later. You can get more enjoyment out of catching smaller fish, bringing a 3 or 2wt fly rod out and catching 6 inch trout on a small creek is still a ton of fun. You can fish more creeks and rivers as many good spots are fly fish only.

Cons...... well i guess the learning curve and the fact that unless you get you casting down fairly well, casting into wind can get to be a bit of a challenge. But other than that there isnt a whole lot of things bad about fly fishing. It can get a bit pricey, I`ve spent in the neighbor hood of 1400 dollars in these 7 months, some of the best money I have ever spent.

Fly fishing is, in my opinion, an art and a finesse sport, nothing against gear fishing and please dont rip my head of anyone for these but, anyone can chuck a big lure out into the water and work it back towards them, with varying amounts of skill. But to be able to mend a section of line through different speeds of water while controlling the speed of your fly effectively is something I have yet to perfectly master. Both so share things in common bandd I do fish both methods, but I enjoy fly fishing oodles and oodles more.

If you plan on trying fly fishing, it is not something you can just jump into, you have to do your research, research your gear, practice for hours and hours out on the lawn with your gear perfecting your casts before even attempting to head out or you will just end up frustrated and angry, ending up with an enjoyable day on the water. I spent a hour and a half out on my lawn practicing each night for 2 months before i ccould feed out 85 feet of line with my 8`6, 5wt rod .

But when you finally get the hang of it and head out and catch your first set of fish, you`ll be hooked and be glad you switched to fly fishing, its just more enjoyable.Hope that helped, and please, dont take offense to my claims against gear fishing, just a personal opinion.

Clayton
 

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very well put clayton, and i agree with you in everything you've said. i also LIKE the fact that there is more of a learning curve and not something you can master over night. gives you more of an urge to get out there more and try and do it better than you did the last outting.
coming home, reading and studying techniques so that you can say to yourself "ok, i'll give that a try next time" or "im going to work on this some more". like you said, it is an art and its something you develope. but its an addicting art and very pleasurable none the less.
i cant see anyone really regretting giving it a try.
 

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Thinking or wanting to try a new method or technique to catch fish is a natural evolution of a fisherman. Personally I cut my teeth on worms and floats as a kid trying to catch anything that would bite, eventually turning my attention to spin casting on most waters I found myself on, then rolled along into drift fishing our south coast rivers. From there it snowballed into fly fishing for everything since. It was the curiousity that got me, through a ton "and then some" ::) of casting practice wanting to learn, and guidence from friends it eventually came together. For me personally it is the total package that is involved in this method that keeps me addicted. Of coarse you'll no doubt hear die hard anglers say the same about their favorite ways to fish. That's the beauty of fishing.8)
Other than being a little more limited in the types of water and conditions you can fish in tough times which can make it harder to get a bent rod or two campared to terminal methods, I find it is a fair trade off for when success is acheived. On lakes... well IMO there is no better way to fish..but I'm bias.:D For those pondering on trying something different I say go with it and see what you get from it.

Finder:cheers:
 

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What really sold me on fly fishing was those days where I had no luck when fishing with gear. When I started fly fishing I didn't just drop gear fishing I did both for a couple years. On a day where I had cast all day with my baitcaster without a bite I thought to myself I would have had a much better time holding my fly rod. Not saying I don't catch a lot of fish, but we all have those days. Also if I enjoy myself not catching fish with a fly imagine how much I love it when I am hooking up!
 

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I picked up fly fishing about 5 years ago and really enjoy it. To be honest I still pick up the gear rod more than half the time, but my fly fishing outings are among the most enjoyable for me. I believe it is important to learn as many techniques and fishing methods as possible to become a well rounded angler. So if its something you would like to try, I say go for it.
 

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Fishing is awesome period!

fly fishing just kicks it up a notch imho - having lived, and fished in Africa, Europe and Canada not to mention trips to Australia, New Zealand and Many, many trips to the US, I can honestly say that the most fun I have ever had, is flinging feather and fur to saltwater varieties of our scaly prey.

Wheter it’s red fish in lagoons of Florida, or Bones in the Keys, strippers in Cape Cod, or Coho just behind the kelp on Vancouver Island it’s a blast second to none.

fresh water fly fishing has its moments too, salmon in Scottish rivers and trout in chalk streams had its attractions, but honestly - sea bass on the Welsh and Cornish coast had me returning week after week like an addict.

I still have bait casters centre pins and spinning rods on my boat, and they have their time and place - but my first choice nowadays is fly rod in briney.
 

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I echo what many have said on this thread. I've been fly fishing nearly a decade, but began as a worm and bobber kid too. My advice, is to figure out if you want to learn to single-hand cast or two-handed (spey cast). (google them if you are not sure what im talking about)

You can learn both of course, but focus on one technique first. Learn the casting technique that you can most easily practice and use on your home waters. If you only fish trout in small lakes definitely learn to single hand. If you are a "river guy" you probably have a choice to make as spey can be as effective as a single, and arguable better on big rivers. ... oh also if you happen to have shoulder issues, spey can be a game changer. Many guys with bad shoulders end up switching to two-handed fly fishing to save their poor broken rotators.

Once you figure what type of casting you wanna learn you you can invest in some gear. Then the real fun starts! - get a lesson if you can afford it!



BTW the "point of no return" is when you buy a fly vice and your first $100 worth of feathers, and fancy coloured threads... you be part of the gang for sure!:thumbup:
 
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