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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
thought I would spark some debate here in response to a previous thread about downrigger rods. Not looking to wind anyone up but I am truly interested in some different opinions.

So what do people think about using gear that is a little light for the target species vs gear that is a little heavy for the target?

For example: I use a stout downrigger rod and fully agree that the smaller fish (coho, pinks, shakers etc) aren't much sport. They come in quick and are released quick. I never thought much about it until my recent trip to Bamfield and we brought in so many coho that we had to release (wild fish in outside waters) that it made me wonder how many would live and how many might die. I am no fish biologist but would lighter gear ie longer plays put more stress on the fish and increase mortality? Obviously on the big springs (20lbs +) the fight was awesome even on the heavy gear.

maybe it is just a philosophy difference between sport fishermen and meat fishermen. I got to admit I love seeing the line peel out but I love it even more when the fish is in the cooler.

tight lines,

Brian :beerchug:
 

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I use 20 except when specificially targetting Coho IMO there isn't a Salmon that swims that can't be taken on 20# line.

One trick to make using lighter line easier is to double the last 10' or so it acts like a shock absorber.

For Coho I use 15 sometime 12# and the same double line setup.
 

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I've got light line, 12-15lb, on a couple reels that I would only use. But since I changed from doing a lot of drift fishing for salmon to trolling with friends that don't fish I've gone back to 20 on almost everything - cept my rod. If I had the money I would use light line on smaller fish, like pinks, sockeye and coho, because there is nothing more frustrating than a fish winched in on heavy line doing 100 mph ciricle with the leader and you wanna let it go with out using the net.
Have fun, Jason
 

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I feel there is no need to use anything heavier than 20 lb for any salmon, just takes more skill time and patience. On the flip side, I don't believe it is "sporting" to use very light line that requires playing the fish to exhaustion if you plan to release it, mortality is very high this way.
I guess it all depends what you get more satisfaction from, the chase or the capture.
 

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The line really doesnt matter imo, as much as the rod its strung through. I fish 30lb on med-light 10'6" rods, with the conjestion that can be found around sooke its nice to be able to choke on off if it starts going the wrong way. Never snapped one off nor broken a rod. The lighter rods are great for everything, and Im sure Ive given them enough of a QC test :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice, thanks for the opinions. :thumbup:

I started this thread because my gut told me that it was silly to literally realease 10-20 + Coho in a day on the offshore banks looking for those 2 hatchery. This pursuit for hatchery fish got me wondering how many would die after being released even though I was careful in my handling practices. To take this further I wondered about all the guys out there with much lighter gear than myself and I wondered if the much longer plays would create even more stress induced mortality. After reading some of your posts I started feeling like an outcast with my stiff rods, Peetz reels, and 40lb test. So I did a little research on the we and to my complete surprise I really can't find any conclusive studies that would confirm that catch and release is a bad thing. So although I am not completely convinced I just might lighten up the gear a bit for next season.

I will probably keep the Peetz out on the bottom lines though. Can't mess with a good thing :wallbash:

tight lines,
Brian
 

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Especailly with the coho the quicker the better, shaker springs are tough things, really hard to hurt, coho on the other hand I could never figure out why the commercail boats had to release them, no matter the size they never really faired too well, watched a few sink to the bottom. Thems was the rules though
 
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