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I know this isn't fishing related but i thought some people may be interested. i wrote this for an englich 11 project. :?

Since before 1892 the Canadian government has placed restrictions on the type of firearm a civilian is allowed to carry. For example, in the pre-1892 years anyone carrying a handgun without a reasonable cause to fear assault was risking a six month jail term. Since then, the notion of gun control has become more advanced and disputed.
Throughout history, the Canadian government has been undecided as to whether or not gun licensing was a good idea. Another issue has been the idea of letting minors handle firearms. In 1913, it was an offence to transfer ownership of a firearm to anyone under sixteen years old, and it was illegal for anyone under sixteen to purchase firearms.
Between 1913 and 1920 the government required guns to be registered. Then in 1921 A Criminal Code amendment repealed the requirement for everyone in possession of a firearm to have a permit. Instead, only “aliens” needed a permit to possess firearms. British subjects still needed a permit to own or carry pistols or handguns.
In 1938, guns did not require serial numbers. It was however an offence to alter or deface numbers such as the model number and caliber. The mandatory 2-year minimum sentence for carry an unlicensed handgun was extended to include the possession of any type of firearm, not just handguns and concealable firearms. The minimum age for possession of firearms was raised from twelve to fourteen years. The first “minor's permit” was created to allow persons under fourteen to have access to firearms.
In 1932 and 1933, specific requirements were added to the handgun permit. Prior to these years, a person had only to be judged of “discretion and good character”. Now they needed to provide reasons for wanting a handgun, and the permits could only be issued if the handgun were to be used in protecting life and property.
The first real registration requirement for handguns was created in 1934. Before then, when a permit holder bought a handgun, the person who issued the permit was notified. The new provisions required records identifying the owner, the owner's address and the firearm.
In 1938, guns did not require serial numbers. It was however an offence to alter or deface numbers such as the model number and caliber. The mandatory 2-year minimum sentence for carry an unlicensed handgun was extended to include the possession of any type of firearm, not just handguns and concealable firearms. The minimum age for possession of firearms was raised from twelve to fourteen years. The first “minor's permit” was created to allow persons under fourteen to have access to firearms.
Beginning in 1939, handguns had to be re-registered every five years. Before 1939, the registration certificates were valid indefinitely. Between 1939 and 1944, the war years, re-registration was postponed but rifles and shotguns had to be registered. This was discontinued after the war.
The idea of renewing firearms has been an undecided issue. During 1950, gun owners did not have to renew their firearms certificates. Now however, before the recent Conservative party takeover, all firearms and licences had to be re-registered every two to five years.
The registry system for firearms was centralized under the commissioner on the RCMP for the first time in 1951. Automatic firearms were also added to the list of firearms that had to be registered.
There are two classes of firearms. They are restricted and non-restricted. Firearms were divided into these two classes in 1968 and 1969, restricted being handguns and semi- and fully-automatic weapons. The non-restricted weapons were the common rifles and shotguns used by hunters and farmers.
Bill C-83 was introduced in 1976. Its proposals included new offences and stricter penalties for the criminal misuse of firearms as well as the prohibition of fully automatic firearms. It also created a licensing system requiring anyone aged eighteen or older to get a licence to acquire or possess firearms or ammunition. Those under 18 were eligible only for minors' permits.
Bill C-51 passed in the House of Commons in 1977. It then received Senate approval and Royal Assent on August 5. The two biggest changes included requirements for Firearms Acquisition Certificates (FACs) and requirements for Firearms and Ammunition Business Permits.
Since then, the FAC has been modified into the PAL or Possession Acquisition Licence in both restricted and no-restricted firearms. This allows the holder to purchase, transport and own firearms as well as buy ammunition.
The steps firearms control in Canada has made are huge, especially in the last few years. Amidst all the controversy, a few steady minds prevailed and have begun fresh changes in the system that will hopefully produce positive results in the years to come.
 
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