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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been surfing around on youtube today, just checking out flytying and it looks a lot easier than I thought it was. Is it really as easy as it looks?

I've been watching this series and he sure makes it look easy. He tied a gold-ribbed bead-head hare's ear in about 5 minutes.

On that note, how much should I spend on a beginners kit if I'm not sure this is for me (I may just end up buying my flies)
 

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Once you get the hang of it it is really easy. I know I had no instruction and my first "flies" barely looked like fur on a hook. But once you get a pattern down and then methods down, it just comes naturally. I find that there will be a period of time where it kicks and you get more efficient at tying the flies and they look better too. As for a kit... you can likely find a decent one for around $100. It will allow you to have a decent vice and enough materials to get going. I went through two kits and then got my Regal Vice and the difference can be huge. Good luck to you and in this patience is definitely of the essence.
 

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i too tried tying on my own but found that not to work for me very well. i found a tackle shop that offered a class which made it alot more enjoyable. as for kits i would just buy the fise and buy the material as you go. pick one fly and tie it well then move on to another. this will keep the original cost down and will not over whelm you with all this material that you really dont need all at once it will only frustrate you because you will want to tie with all that material before you know how to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Excellent advice Bill and STS, thanks. I don't think there's a tackle shop here in Courtenay that offers fly tying lessons, but I'm sure they offer them out at the F&G club.

There's only 4 or 5 flies that I want to tie well...anything outside of that, I'll probably buy the first couple to see how well they work. Chironomids look relatively easy to tie so I'll start out with those. That hare's ear looked easy as well.
 

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Tying flies that will catch fish isn't all that hard. Take a course, it will teach you the methods you need, then the actual skill is up to you. Like all physical activities, you will get better if you practice, but the laying the basics with a course is the best way to go. Dragonfly makes a pretty good kit, if you want to go that route. Try to find a kit (many shops will put a package together for you) that contains quality tools, a couple of spools of thread and perhaps some peacock herl, deer hair, and maybe some wire. In other words don't worry about getting materials in the kit, they are usually crap. Buy the materials you are going to need for the flies you are going to tie. You will gradually build up a decent stock. Remember, this is what you are in for: http://www.bcfishingreports.com/forum/index.php?topic=5986.0
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those are some serious fly tying rooms/areas/alcoves. I'm pretty sure I'm not going to "collect" that amount of material.

If I'm going to have a store put a kit together for me, what are some of the things I should be looking/asking for (tools, material, etc)? I know there are different price points for each vice, but what is the difference to cause the price to jump?

BTW, you guys rock!
 

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I learned the basics by tying along with a video. I wish I had taken a course, but it never occurred to me at the time. Now I am pretty good, but there are some techniques that I just don't have down, like dry fly wings. When you pick your first few flies to learn, I recommend that you pick some that will let you practice a variety of techniques so you build a bunch of skills at the same time. It will get easy fast, and it is a ton of fun to trick fish with flies that you tied or invented. It is time consuming, but it is satisfying.
 

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I tried tying my own with no lessons just using sites on the net and it did not work well
so i had some lessons $100.00 and wow what a difference
you get to see the big picture
well worth the cost
as for materials where i went for my lessons they now give me discount on all my materials i buy there
Just get a good (not cheap) vice it will make all the difference
and have a go its addictive
i wish i had more time to practice
i just tie a few here and there as i think i will need them
 

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11th Warrior said:
Those are some serious fly tying rooms/areas/alcoves. I'm pretty sure I'm not going to "collect" that amount of material.
Yeah-That's what I thought 10 years ago.

If I'm going to have a store put a kit together for me, what are some of the things I should be looking/asking for (tools, material, etc)? I know there are different price points for each vice, but what is the difference to cause the price to jump?
You need a good pair of scissors. I recommend a pair with open loops for the fingers. They are looser which allows you to keep them on (thumb and ring finger) all the time while performing other tasks. A couple of bobbins with ceramic inserts. A hair stacker (medium), whip finisher, bobbin threader, hackle pliers (a rotating one is best). A good vise. You can get a decent vise for about $70 or so. Griffin makes a good mid priced vise that's available at most shops. The things to look for in a vise (and what makes for higher prices):
-Jaws that will adjust to accommodate a wide range of hook sizes and hold them securely,
-Jaws that are tempered and will not groove up after using them for awhile.
-Solid screw base or heavy free standing metal base
-Rotation (but don't bother unless you get a really good and expensive vise.)
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Prof!

I'm headed down to Gone Fishin' tomorrow, to see what I can get them to put together for me. I've got another week off work and this should occupy my time quite nicely :thumbup:
 

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There is nothing more rewarding than catching a fish on a fly you have tied yourself!!

Years ago I bought a fly tying starter kit and took a fly tying class at Berry's Bait & Tackle. Once a week for approx. 6 weeks. It was the best thing I could of done, it totally simplified things for me. It didn't make me a pro or anything but gave me the tools to tie any kind of fly.

Also the people at Michael & Young Flyshop we very helpfull. If I wanted to tie Black leeches or chironimids for example, they would gather the proper supplies for me, pull out the vise and tie one right there (using my supplies I was going to buy) going through each step. I would rush home and pratice, and it didn't take long before I was tying some pretty smokin patterns.

So my advice would be to take a class & if fly tying classes are not available where you live, befriend your local tackle shop and see if they will show you how to tie the patterns you want. As long as you buy the supplies from them it shouldn't be a problem.

Happy tying
Nickers :peace:
 

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Cabela's has a nice starting kit (thats what I have), comes with every thing you need and the quality has proved quite good so far. I'm not sure of the price since it was given as a gift, but I'm sure a quick peek at their website will tell you.

11th Warrior said:
I've been surfing around on youtube today, just checking out flytying and it looks a lot easier than I thought it was. Is it really as easy as it looks?

I've been watching this series and he sure makes it look easy. He tied a gold-ribbed bead-head hare's ear in about 5 minutes.
It depends on the fly you are tying, dry flies are considered harder to tie, while wet flies are easier.


K F
 

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im not a great tyer but i can still tie what i use and am still learning more of course :drunk: someone bought me a starter kit and it collected dust for a couple years, then finally i decided to give this a go because you save alot of money this way. I have only been tying flies maybe 3yrs. I dont tie many but i am pretty good at the ones i do tie. Michael & Young is a great shop I had Adrian show me how to tie a rolled muddler for coho and she tied this with their materials(just a bunch of whatever was on the table that is in the fly) I went home that day and tied a few and i now can tie these as good if not nicer than the ones i used to buy :thumbup: I fish these alot for coho, springs,pinks and they even work for steelies (so i have heard) I tie mostly salmon flies but the first fly i did tie and tied it well was a Doc Spratley, was told its a tricky fly and has most the elements of a fly in it ;D


I dont have a great vise and need to upgrade to tie big spey flies because mine dont fit them!!!! :mad: :mad:
 

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ambler said:
I may have the cheapest crappiest vice in the world. But I can tie anything I want. Don't be seduced by fancy hardware, buy cheap steel and fancy fluff.
I started with the cheap vise that came in a tying kit. It worked OK for a couple of years, but the hooks are harder than the steel of the jaws on i t and eventually it got all grooved up and no longer held smaller hook securely. I then bought a Griffin 2a vise from Searun for about $75.



I have used it for 7 or 8 years without any real regrets. I recently purchased a Regal knockoff for about $25 at Hatch Matchers in Maple Ridge (every shop seems to carry them). I got it because it is a rotatable vise (not true rotating vise though) to see if I would use the rotating features much.
The points being:
-A cheap vise will work fine for a couple of years (more if you don't tie much) but will eventually need to be replaced. The jaws are the weak link
-You can get a lifetime vise for under $100. They are built with tool steel.
-A really expensive vise is probably only needed if you are planning on tying commercially, but is sure nice if you can afford one.
 

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jetboatjim said:
I would suggest buying a vice from a local shop! :2cents:
I have to agree with JBJ. There is no shop that can compete with Cabelas. They buy in such quantity that wholesalers give them preferred pricing, but that shouldn't checking them out a knee jerk reaction every time we think of buying something. Keep going there and before you know it, the locals are out of business and you are out of luck. By the way, that vise can be had for about $30 buck more at Pacific Anglers, and when you factor in the $20 shipping charges fro Cabelas, it costs about $10 more to support a local shop.
 

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I found this out when i tried to look at the Waterskeeter pontoons they sell because they are the ONLY lower mainland dealer (or at least thats what i fount out online) If i was going to get it for sure i would have ordered it already. I looked at vises at M&Y and the cheapest one they have is over $100
 
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