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Well, I know this is a bit premature, but it's looking like I won't be able to find the time to do any fishing until the springs open up :cry: :cry: :cry:
So, I thought I might start some discussions regarding those brutes who every year put the sage to the maximum test....
Wondering about your experiences on the ved, (and other flows), what you've all been successfull with over the years and where, etc, etc, etc...
I've had some success with a variety of lures, but I've found tiny spin 'n' glows work really well more often than anything else...also, I don't often get many trully bright fish and am wondering if there might be someone here who has had success hooking up with real chromers during this run...
Thx,
Rib
 
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Man I know how it feels (not having the time) I have only been out once since Nov 1st of 2005! and won't have the time till mid May! Although I will be out like every weekend till late july and than every day in august, october and November :lol:
 

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" i ain't been out once since sept. 2005"

Man that is pathetic me thinks you should just trade in the rods for an apron! :lol:
 

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I've always done best shortfloating roe above them. I used to use small pieces of wool and fish down to the stacked fish in the deep fast water, until I came to the conclusion that this was simply flossing(some will bite the wool if presented properly). Unfortunatately thats exactly what has become of this fishery, and most good spots are filled with people lining fish.
I've also found krill and shrimp can work well and have started to have success with jigs, but was never able to hold them with light hooks. Fortunately I am making my own jigs this season for springs and they are on SUPER strong hooks, looking forward to experimenting with some new patterns.
If you want clean fish, look to the lower end and try and catch the newcomers on a good tide,or you can troll the mouth with a boat or cast spinners and spoons.Many fish get slightly dark(a little reddish) before they run the Vedder, although as table fare they are excellent if caught soon after arrival.
 

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Not in July but during the time when Reds start mixing with the Whites, My buddy got one 30lb Spring that was chrome. Now keep in mind this was the upper river, so it was in great shape. After he cut it open, it turned out to be a red spring. Not marble, pure red. IIRC it was caught on a small roe bag with green wool being short floated.
 

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I agree that fishing the lower would give you the best chance of hooking a chromer especially if the water is low, but they can be caught on the upper as well. I caught a 30lb+ bright silver chromer last year on the upper. Focus on the faster water to target the fresh fish that are moving through the system. I have never fished the vedder that early in the season but the same should still apply.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I've usually only hooked into somewhat colored fish, although one year early July I did get into some bright fish down just above the canal when they where doing some work on the river in the last couple pools....I think they were removing some gravel? anyway whatever year that was....some time ago I think...This year I'm hunting the fresh fish in earnest, and will concentrate almost all of my time on the lower river....has anyone fished much in the lower ends of the canal this year? I think the furthest down I've ever bothered to walk is the hwy bridge, otherwise I go by boat...how much more is there for foot access below that? Can you walk all the way down to the mouth? If I can access much more river down there on foot rather than boat then I might go more often and scout the river during lower water to see where the channels/trenches are, but it would save me some time if I knew it were worth it...
Thanks,
rib
 

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ironheads advice is good. i find the second and third week of july to be the best, generally speaking. ghost shrimp, roe, or a red and black wool tie have always worked well for me, short floated.
 

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Questions

Hi all,

I'm finding this thread interesting as a new comer to BC (but not fishing). There are lots of words and phrases used that I think I know what they mean, but am not quite sure, so I thought I'd try and get 1 of you guys to clarify this for me, if you'd be so kind!

Am I right in thinking a Chromer is simply a Salmon that is still silver in colour and thus indicates it is frsh run from the sea - why is this significant - are they better eating?

What is the difference between Red and White Springs? Size, eating quality, fighting ability? How do you tell the 2 apart?

By "short floated" do you simply mean fishing shallow? If so how shallow? Are you having to actually pervent the hook+bait from moving through a shoal to avoid snagging/flossing? (probably a daft question as it'll obviously depend on the bit of water being fished, but say on an average Vedder pool)

tight lines,

cheers,

Paul.
 

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Hey Rib,

I agree that there's a better chance of getting chrome/bright fish in the lower section. A few years back - my buddy and I each got a spring in the lower section on the fly. My buddy's was just a bit coloured, but mine was chrome! I agree with FF that if a red spring is just a bit coloured - there's no problem with the quality of the meat. My first red spring was caught on the fly in the Chehalis and it had just a bit of colour to it. But the meat was excellent. On the other hand - I have a feeling that whites are more prone to reduced quality meat when they colour up. I don't really know the answer to this - so if someone knows please do tell!

murkeywaters - here's my understanding:

- A chromer is a silver fish with no indication of colouration. Chromers tend to be fresh and full of energy, and their spots (e.g. depending on the species) may be quite faded. Their flesh will also be of high quality. As the fish begins to mature and colour, it's silvery appearance begins to fade. Bright fish are still silvery in appearance, but start to show colour "tinges" and spotting along the back and tail become more prominent (I've observed this in coho and pinks, less so in springs). Quality of meat from a "bright" fish tends to vary depending on the species. As time moves on, the fish colours up and eventually becomes a "boot". Hint - don't keep boot fish!

- red springs have red meat while white springs have white meat. Otherwise, they are the same species and look the same on the outside. Whites do have a stronger odour to them in my opinion. I prefer the red meat over the white.

- you've hit the mark with the term "short floating". I guess they call it short floating because the distance between the presentation (e.g. bait, etc.) and float is short, resulting in a shallow presentation. I would guess that the leader length is also quite short to avoid flossing. Short floating will avoid snagging fish or the bottom. Fish tend to actively bite things presented above them. So - if you get a strike when short floating, you can be confident that the fish actually took the bait as opposed to you flossing or snagging the fish.
 

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I guess they call it short floating because the distance between the presentation (e.g. bait, etc.) and float is short,
My understanding is the "short float" method is the distance between the last weight above the swivel and the bottom of your float. This distance is called the "scope" and in short floating your "scope" averages 18 inches or so - longer in deeper water. If you use sliding pencil lead as your weight and an 18 inch leader - the advantage is you will feel even the most subtle bite and the chances of hooking the fish in the mouth increases.
 

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Actually "shortfloating" is a term that has been used just recently to describe the method of floatfishing, with emphasis on keeping your presentation OFF the bottom and in the fishes window of vision. Example is if your fishing a run that is 6 ft deep, you will adjust your float to keep your offering a foot off the bottom, although I often try and keep it 2 ft off bottom, as fish can see up and will move up for a good presentation. Also with shortfloating you will not lose gear , and any suspicous float movement is almost always a fish.
In the past the theory was that you had to be on bottom and losing gear to be fishing properly,HOGWASH I say and many top rods I know are exclusive shortfloaters and use the same float and terminal gear for weeks.
As Chinook are a large fish and tend to stack in deep faster water, the tendency for many is to dredge(constantly bounce bottom) with a long line and often a excessive leader length (18 + inches). Of course the lure of choice is the almighty wool and often a corky and they set the hook everytime they feel a bump, which is every few feet when you dredge. Predictably, success is guaranteed with this technique, as the fish have NO SAY in the matter and the reputation of springs loving dredged wool is born.
This technique is guarateed to snag fish, it's plain physics, no argument can refute this.
Although I must add that wool can be a very good presentation when presented above the fish and tied using the right color combo. But realistically it's reputation of being a great lure is mostly based on the professional snagger and his mastery of disguising snagging as float fishing.
This is why you hear of "shortfloating", because many of us no longer accept this method as actual angling and are trying to educate new anglers on correct float fishing techniques.
I hope any new anglers who read this will give "shortfloating" a fair shot and not resort to dredging to realize success, because snagging a fish in the outside of the mouth(often the place of hookup and the angler thinks the fish bit,LOOK CLOSER) is not ANGLING SUCCESS, but may put meat in the freezer if thats all that counts.
I would like to add that there are times when getting down to the fish and ticking bottom every few feet will result in a genuine hook up, but I strongly feel and have proven time and again that the same fish will move up and take a good presentation, because folks PRESENTATION is everything.
For me, nothing can catch springs as well as good bait, whether it is Roe, ghost shrimp , Prawns, Krill even Dew worms can be great. Sometimes spoons and spinners can be productive as well. My jig business partner Sanderson had excellent success last season using jigs for the summer springs and the fall runs too, so that will be my main focus this season.
If you are interseted in trying jigs this summer for Chinook and sockeye(in the clear water), our jigs are for sale at "On The way store" or you can order them online from me directly at www.bentrods.ca .
 

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I myself have never tryed to fish for red springs in the vedder befor but thats my choice(usually way too hot!) but i have gone there in the summer to see how people make out trying there luck and when i did go i started at keith wilson bridge and the two main methods of fishing there was fly fishing, and bottom bouncing(snagging) because i can't stand bottom bouncing in the vedder i stay away from there mind you there was fish on shore but everyone i have seen are way too coloured up take home! in august was when i was there lastyear and from top to bottom every fish i seen was so black and ppl still bonk them don't get it! i have yet to see a chrome fish from the vedder but mind you i rarely get out enough to! maybe someone can share some pictures of chrome fish cought on the vedder? red springs that is!

C.K.
 

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Hey cohokiller - I would gladly send a photo - but I've been having problems with the photo gallery. I used to have several photos posted on Fishing with Rod - but I lost the gallery when I didn't subscribe. I'll see what I can do...

Hey Ironhead - you mentioned a number of baits that work great for springs. Good information! I also find that they readily take well presented flies as well - except you need the right kind of water conditions which are more difficult to find. However, when the fish are on - look out! Too bad the run of Vedder reds isn't nearly as big as the whites!
 

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hey magician that would be cool to see if it isn't to hot i just may give er a try this summer wouldn't hurt! and i wondered the same thing on why the fall springs are more abundant than the summer run? wish it was the other way around!

C.K.
 

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thats way better!!!!! awesome looking fish! all caught on the fly? hmmmmmmmm Ilike it!
 
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