BC Fishing Reports banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, New to the sport with dry line and flies, I haven't had any bites yet. I can't really cast all that far, and I am going from shore. So when I cast, and I get the fly on the water, do I just wait a bit, and occasionally give it some twitches and slowly retrieve it? Also my flies tend to sink, can this be cured by floatant or is it the way I am landing the fly on the water that it sinks?

Any tips on playing the fly, or whatever to do for trout would be greatly appreciated.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
2,854 Posts
definately get some floatant :thumbup:

I have only managed to be on a lake for a dry fly hatch ONCE and i didnt have to twitch the fly at all they were on it within seconds of it hitting the water.

i have not fished any rivers myself YET but i do know that you need to have a DRAG FREE drift when presenting a dry fly on moving water. which can be tricky to learn from what i understand :peace:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Bring some shake as well as floatant, on those magic days when your dry spends almost as much time in fishes mouths as it does floating you will need both shake and floatant I have found.

You won't need it often but when you do you will be glad it is around :thumbup:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,796 Posts
The one I have seen most often is a Loon product called "Easy Dry". It is a container of silica beads, that you place a dry fly that has become soaked into (either from being sunk by repeated casting in rough water, or has been taken by a fish) and then shake it back and forth. The silica beads rapidly dry off the fly and make it ready to fish, or apply floatant to. It is often referred to as "shake 'n' bake". I am sure there are other manufacturers of similar products. It really works great.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Like Hook said, in moving water try to get a drag free drift. Get the leader out straight as best as you can. You don't want any motion of the fly line affecting the fly's natural drift either.

As for keeping it dry, the beads and floatant all help. I find the "false casting" helps too. You can even keep a little towel or something that will absorb the water if you don't want to use the beads. And...if the fly just won't dry, you can always just quickly tie another on and let the wet one dry and switch them around like that.

Best of luck
-Cap Mano
 

· Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks everyone! I will pick up some floatant or shake soon.

I am mostly fishing in lakes, sometimes on the outlets where the water drains from the lake to a river. ( I do not know the proper term)

Not very rapid, very slow moving water at the most (but it is windy!)

what is a drag free drift? is it when your line is not influencing the movement of your fly at all? kinda like making sure there is no resistance and letting the line go where it needs?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
kssm said:
I am mostly fishing in lakes, sometimes on the outlets where the water drains from the lake to a river. ( I do not know the proper term)
Tributary

what is a drag free drift? is it when your line is not influencing the movement of your fly at all? kinda like making sure there is no resistance and letting the line go where it needs?
Yes

also, what I understand, is there isnt a lot to do when you land the fly? you just wait and twitch it a bit?
It depends on what fly you're using as it has to move in a natural way to imitate the real insect. I recommend you read an entomology book. There are several good ones out there, but the book I use as reference is "The Complete Book of Western Hatches: An Angler's Entomology and Fly Pattern Field Guide."
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,796 Posts
A drag free drift, is when the fly drifts along at the same speed and in the same direction as the water. A good way to gauge how well your fly is drifting, is to check the little bits of foam, leaves, and other stuff on the water nearby. If your fly is not passing, or being passed by the other stuff nearby, you are keeping the fly drifting well. Mending line upstream or downstream, as needed is mandatory to lengthen your drift.
On a lake, your best bet is to spot rising fish, and then cast to a few feet away from the rise form. If you can identify a direction the fish might be heading (like if you can see them) cast 5 or 6 feet ahead of the fish and them hang on and see what happens. If your fly does sink, try short,2 to 5 inch strips to bring it back. Fish will often take a sunk dry as a drowned adult, or an emerger.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
kssm said:
I am mostly fishing in lakes, sometimes on the outlets where the water drains from the lake to a river. ( I do not know the proper term)
You got it right man, it is known as an "outflow" or an "outlet"

There are some fantastic fishing ops in outlets I can think of a few that call me back whenever I get a chance! :happy:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top