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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for some input on a setup i'm looking to but for the upcomming salmon season on the chuck! I know i'm not the best fisherman out there BUT i want to look like one! I'm looking to buy an islander mooching reel mr2 to go with a sage mooching rod,but what is the best sage mooching rod on the market? i've tryed to look aroung certian sites but not to much luck on info, can anyone help and maybe shoot me in the right direction to find my saltwater setup? thanx alot!

C.K.
 

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coho_killer said:
I'm looking for some input on a setup i'm looking to but for the upcomming salmon season on the chuck! I know i'm not the best fisherman out there BUT i want to look like one! I'm looking to buy an islander mooching reel mr2 to go with a sage mooching rod,but what is the best sage mooching rod on the market? i've tryed to look aroung certian sites but not to much luck on info, can anyone help and maybe shoot me in the right direction to find my saltwater setup? thanx alot!

C.K.
Why do you want to spend $400-$500 on a reel and $500 on a rod? That's a very expensive set up. Formerly owning a set of Islanders, G Loomis, Lamiglass, and Sages up the ying yang... they're great, and a lot of fun. However, when you're not getting a return on your investment and they're causing more hassle than pain--why bother? I sold them when I got out of full-time guiding. Put the $$$ into investments now I can go and buy a locker full of them if I wanted.

However, hiding your set up before you come to the dock, the gas dock, or whereever isn't fun and games---and you're just setting yourself up to get hit by thieves!!! Unless you're putting in several hundred hours fishing a summer in an area where you're hooking large springs left right and center, you're not getting a good return.

What type of boat are you fishing out of?? and how much fishing do you intend to do? Are you going to use the one rod on your downrigger or mooch exclusively with weights? If so, don't over do it on your release clips when you tighten 'er down.

The quality, action, responsiveness of mooching rods out there these days in the $90 to $120 range has expanded dramatically, and you should find yourself impressed with the VALUE they offer over fussing with high $$$ trinkets.

As for islander reels..they're super and silky smooth just doesn't do it justice....I'd recommend reconditioned or "blems" from Islander if you can get your hands on them. Usually insiders have their hands on them before anyone else.

Just my experience as someone who has "been there" and "done that".



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CK,

I have an MR3 (like the bigger diameter than the MR2 for negligibly more money) and I have a TFO Terry Haydyn #3 - the latter I haven't used yet but is about $250 cheaper than the Islander and internals are very similar. I would tend to recommend you consider the latter based on the price.

If you are going Sage I would run a 4100-2 - that or the 4110 which is all my buddies use. I just couldn't bring myself to fork the bucks for one so I had Russ from Stryker custom build a rainshadow blank (BP1266F) with graphite butt for Christmas - it too is a couple hundred buck cheaper than the Sage.

Just a landlubber's view, but for $500 less the rod/reel combo I have I am ecstatic about.
 

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C.K.,
The best mooching rod ever made was KGX 90/99 light and heavy mooching rod by Diawa. I know many will bock with the mention of a company like Diawa but before they sold-out in the mid 90's they had sepecialty rod for every way of fishing. These rods were great quality at an absloutly stupid price. They are incredably sensetive... like if you used a light enough weight you could feel the herring. Like an ugly stick you can bend em in two. And like any good rod the blank goes all the way to the butt. I've only had one break because of a flaw in the carbon, the rest have lasted nearly 20 years with guild replacement of course - and I am a bastard to my gear. The light one makes for a good downrigger rod and the heavy or power mooching one will mooch with up to 10oz. of lead but still is sensitive. I use it alot as a trolling rod with lead or divers on it. I don't know if you can find these rods anymore but it might be something to look for if you stop by a garage sale or consinment store.
As for the Islander and it's ilk, since when has brass and elector plated metal been need for a single action salt water reel? I'd go with a Petz before a Islander even if given to me - ok, maybe not. I got a bunch of cheezy grafite single action reel that have worked for me for the better part of 20 years and only one has sucome to a seal bending the spindle. But the drag on the Islander is better... WHAT?! It is a single action reel your hand should be the drag! And if it has one of the you real in easier then the line come out that is not single action, that is cheating. But if I treat my Islander nice it will last forever... yeah my $40 buck Shimano or Diawa lasted 20 year with me not giving a rat-ass about maintenaince. Islander is a name you buy, in in my book your not cool if you have them. It is not like there is a huge diffance in technologe between single action reels for salmon fishing... drift fishing on a river definatly, but not mooching.
Have fun, Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
very good points guys and i thank you for your honesty! Now i'm thinking on now getting a custom rod built that will run me a few hundred less then a sage right? As for the islander reel, right now i'm using or was using a diawa m-two! Sold that because i'm set in getting an islander maybe now a mr 3 prehaps! It's just something i've wanted ever since i laid eyes on it! As for the rod custom is the way for me to go! I fish everywhere from vancouver to Prince rupert the island,wherever i can wet a line and time allows it! My setup will strictly be used on a downrigger with flasher(sometimes) and no flasher others! You guys were a great help and for that i thank you! I'll post in the up comming weeks on what setup i choose!

C.K.
 

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there has been some advice on the 'ideal mooching' set-up. so i'll throw in my two bits for what it's worth. all the previous advice are good but not neccesarily right for every individual. i'm not gonna suggest anything particular, but just give my views and opinions on different products or brands.

there are low, mid & hi end rods. there are low & hi end single action 'mooching' reels.

most people like playing fish with a parabolic bend in the rod (evenly bent throughout the rod) - usually a moderate action. for mooching most rods are slow to moderate in action (softer). this will absorb any jerking motion from waves (you buzz bombs... not cut plugs). for downriggers, moderate to fast rods are more common (stiffer). when fish release from the rigger they are no longer biting anymore so the quicker can reel and set the hook the better your odds are sticking the fish - stiffer rod equals positive connection. i personally perfer moderate action, which will allow me to load up the road on the rigger better. it also visually looks fishier. moderate action also doubles for mooching. the action of a rod also helps anglers that are a little more challenged with single action type reels. a longer spongy rod will give time for a person to react to letting a fish run (or let go of the handles) reducing shot-guns and knuckle dusting.

reels that have a one way system (increasing drag also increases drag on retrieve) are fun and give personal satisfaction when playing fish, but you need to have a reasonablygood at using a single action reel. two way reels (retrieve stays easy when drag is increased) are good for people that are challenged with single action reels. example - anglers with weaker arms can hold onto the rod with both hands while still maintaining good pressure on fish. also minimizes back lashes when loading up rod and then suddenly deciding to release handles.

using one way reels (hardy longstones, diawa 175 & 275, etc...) under certain fishing conditions can be difficult. i would not like to rely on my palm as a drag when yanking on 20 lb springs all day. they are not ideal for downriggers (tight drag from setup sucks when trying retrieve slack line from a pop-off). these types of reels are also not as accessible anymore. two way reels (diawa m-two, shimano 2000 & 4000, islander mr2 & mr3) are most versatile for most single action skill levels and most versatile for mooching or downrigging. cork type drags are the smoothest, but require more maitenance to stay smooth. money aside, the mr2 'mooching' reel is maybe not the best bang for the buck (not mass produced, thus the high price), but is the best and most versatile single action moocher out there. the mr3 has a large spool for quicker pick-up and a large arbor so you don't have to load up as much unused line. it also has larger cork drag (dissapates heat better keep drag smoother while fighting fish). holes drilled on back side to lighten weight of reel will also salt water easier access to was out oils on cork drag - more maitenance to keep smooth. there is no free spool option for dropping to the bottom or when letting line down on the rigger to minimize wear on the cork. in this case i think the more expensive reels (islander, tfo, etc... ) are the better reels. if you can afford it, why not? the shimano and diawa reels are a good second option if price is a factor. high price is not always the better product. i think in this case it is.

shimano, daiwa, shakespear (uglystik), etc... make durable good boat rods for low to mid range prices. they are also reasonable with warrenties. good bang for the buck. custom built rods are great. they a personal affect, but how much are you gonna cutomizes it? different colour wraps? longer or shorter handles? chances are factory rod have already set good standards for the layout of a rod. usually if you break a custom built rod (accidents happen), the blank may be lifetime but rebuilding it isn't. if it is the bottom half, only the guides and reel seet are savageable (someone has too strip them off the original). the cork material can average about $60 alone. then it must be bored assembled and shaped. if you can afford it, why not? it'll be exactly what you want. want high end without hassels. then try sage or gloomis factory rods. some of these manufactuers will replace tops and/or bottoms for free or a small charge (about $30/tip and $60/bottom).

best is not always the most expensive, but if it is and you can afford it, why not? i always look at the best first, then decide what i can afford, then decide the best i can afford. the way i see it... when you're catching fish, you may not notice the difficiencies of your equipment. so why wouldn't want enjoy your equipment when not catching fish as much as when you are? good equipment is not a waste of money if you enjoy it whether it's $40 or $500. spend alot of money on any boat, then spend the adequate money outfitting properly. I see alot of save for a boat and cheap out on outfitting. ie cheap or not enough equipment (one down rigger & one rod) all that money on gas & boat and they don't mazimize the enjoyment!

these are just my views, not neccessarily right! please excuse any typos
 
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