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Yup, you heard it here first. Sportsnet.

Now for the archived stories section:





A gathering we had once upon a time...

It is fortunate that we are all able to share a common passion and appreciation for sportfishing in our great country and around the world. This website, amongst others, allows people from various parts of the globe, with diverse backgrounds, ethnicity, age and experience to come together in a public forum to share a common interest in the sport of angling. The BC fishing reports forum enjoys a vast array of visitors who share their knowledge, experience and passion for life and fishing. Many of the members here interact through the worldwideweb to satisfy, and feed, this passion. Although rarely are we as members here able to meet, once or twice a year a fishout is held, where we can get to know the people we meet on this great site a little better and share in our beautiful province and fisheries...This is my first fishout. I hadn't met any of the members here besides Steelietrav and Coho Killer, and was excited to meet many of the great people I had spoken with online. Needless to say, this won't be my last fishout...a heartfelt word of thanks to those who took the time and effort to organize and coordinate the latest of BCFR's fishouts!


Friday morning arrived for many of us with the promise of a great couple of days in the valley!!! Many of the members here had been anxiously waiting for the week to finally come to an end...and the fish out to begin! The "first wave" of BCFR members arrived at our designated camp in the mid afternoon of Friday November 24th, the fun was just getting started....

Fishortho, Marko, Slamdunk, Wookie and Ogobogo all arrived at our meeting place at various stages of the afternoon on Friday and were welcomed by mother nature with somewhat less than friendly weather...wet heavy snow hampered their efforts to get settled in but with a wee bit of tasting to be had, the inspiration was not lacking...Under less than envious conditions to set up camp, a nice raging fire, a communal "dry" area, some "warmers", snacks and smiles were all smartly in order by the time the second wave arrived...

HeyNow, WifeofHeyNow and their trusty companion Caesar, arrived almost exactly the same time Steelietrav and I were driving in...hand shakes and introductions were exchanged, and we all set off to meet the other members of BCFR who were nuts enough to camp in this cold...Although a light blanket of snow had fallen during the day, the conditons upon our arrival were somewhat more benign...cold, but not wet...After some jubilant introductions to those who had already arrived, the last of the camps were set up and we all settled in to warm ourselves by the fire and get to know each other a little better...



We take our fishouts very seriously here at BCFR, and there are several criteria we try to meet above all others..The most important of all are that we must not take anything too seriously unless it is fishing, we must have a great time, and we must be responsible and protect our ability to keep warm...when the last of us arrived, we saw that these criteria had been aptly met, and it was good to see we had the means to defend our tastier libations from any and all harm whatsoever...:wink:



Well, needless to say, we all got along famously and enjoyed our ever shortening evening staying warm by the fire, telling jokes, laughing at whatever sprung to mind, and above all, enjoying each others company until some ungodly hour before we all settled in to sleep before our fishing day began...not to mention a visit or two from not so wild apparitions warily keeping an eye on us from afar...



Rain hit us hard in the late hours of Friday night, and the prospect of a cold miserable sleep was a daunting one for most of us I'm sure...As the night progressed into the wee hours of the morning and we all tossed and turned in anticipation of the day to come, the deluge of rain pelting the rooves of our tents and trucks began to subside, and we woke to a dry, cool winter morning with the snowline just a few hundred meters above us blanketing the mountains around us in a cool morning hue of white...



Slowly one by one the members of our motley crew awoke to the sound of a crackling fire and the sizzling of bacon on the frying pan courtesy of a much appreciated, and early riser, Marko...one by one we wiped the dreary sleep from our eyes and began to prepare ourselves for the day ahead...while breakfast was cooking and we were waking up I couldn't help but take in the fresh air and views around me...Snow covered mountains, mist crowned waters, and the sound of eagles voicing their goodmorning, greeted all my senses...looking up, the eagles were cruising the skies well above the tree tops on a beautiful but chilly fishout morning...



But in keeping our priorities straight, Breakfast! HMMMMMMMM...



With our bellies nicely warmed by tasty meals and a few cups of nice hot coffee...we were greeted by the last arrivals to the fishout...Hook, Wagonmaster and Tamihi railslide had arrived to share in the camaraderie we had all enjoyed the night before...After introductions, a few more laughs, some debate and decision making, the members of BCFR were ready to go...shortly after 8 am our fishout split up into three separate groups to ply our chosen waters in search of the memories we so often create when we find the time to revel in our beloved province...

With our groups going off in three separate ways...the fishing was about to begin!

Ogobogo, Heynow, and WifeofHeyNow drove off in one direction, while a two truck caravan carrying Hook, Wagonmaster, Tamihi railslide, Wookie, Marko, Steelietrav and myself drove off in another. Fishortho and slamdunk prepared to play in the "jet boat" while waiting for FishFinder to arrive for their own adventure...The snow began to fall...and roads were showing their winter colors to be sure...



With WifeofHeyNow at the wheel excursion A set off into the great white north. As they leave the pavement, she asks "so, just how rough is this road?" Ogo, who of course has to be honest with her, tells her that he'd actually never driven it, but that he'd heard it was not too bad...

Meanwhile, excursion B, with Steelietrav at the wheel, is also optimistic at the promise of the day to come...

As they climb above the snowline, Ogo, Heynow and WifeofHeynow watch out the window as the road becomes white, WifeofHeynow mentions casually " Gee , we sure are climbing." To which Ogobogo replies, "I'm pretty sure that the road starts to come back down after this ridge, so we probably wont get too much higher." I wonder how she likes my lies so far??? he thinks to himself, unsure of what the road has in store ahead...dodging fallen trees, thankful that someone before them was carrying a chainsaw, they were quickly pushing snow with the undercarriage of the truck.



Just as WifeofHeyNow begins to think that all hope has been lost, excursion A begins to descend down to the river. As quickly as they entered it, they exited the snow zone, and an hour or so after leaving pavement, with some awesome scenery to keep them occupied, they arrive at the river. It was about 10 am, and spirits were definitely up!

Down at base camp...Fishortho and slamdunk sit warm and cozy by the fire waiting for Fishfinder to show up and enjoy the peace and quiet that comes with camping in such weather. Discussing what to use and where to fish, they pass the time until Finder's arrival...

Back in the Explorer, excursion B was well into the snow line and quickly realizing that access was most definitely limited...the desired fishing spot was not to be...snow, and too much of it, was putting a damper on things and the fearless group had to improvise, and quick! With a short pitstop, and discussions on the alternatives, excursion B decided to forage on and travel to places much, much further away than they intended. "How gorgeous is this!", I said out loud, and we soaked in the view through a window of trees, before turning our trucks around, and starting anew again...



Did I mention the gunshots??? I will...:wink:

The river is almost gin clear, just a hint of green in the deeper pools. Excursion A arriving efficiently at their spot, quickly set up their gear and walked down to explore the possibilities...A couple of quick casts with Ogobogo's trusty "double brass spoon" and the river yields a lovely wild coho. No picture of this little beauty, as while wrestling the little guy, trying to position him for the "magazine shot, the little lightning bolt took off back into the waters it claimed as its own just moments before..."I think I'll stick with this spoon for a while!", Ogo thought to himself...and HeyNow, Ogo and wifeofheynow all begin to work the pool with a renewed vigor...

At about the same time Ogo was releasing his fish, Excursion C was getting started...Fishfinder arrives at camp along with a change in the winds, and a pretty stiff breeze begins to blow along the river...the decision is made to leave the trusty vessel in its berth, and hike down to some spots to fish from shore...they gather the gear together wondering how the others are doing...meanwhile up in the snow, excursion B was getting closer to their newly chosen destination...or so they thought...

"Wow...I can't remember it being this long a drive out here...", Ribwart said out loud wondering whether or not they were going to get any fishing in today...The two truck caravan had put many kilometers behind them driving through snow and sleet and slush...Complete changes in direction, anxious glances at the clock and urgent peering through the foggy windows in search of spots well placed, far, far back in the memories of the group that is excursion B, leads them to stop, consult a map and come up with a new plan of attack...again...:roll: Off to an entirely different flow it seems will be the trick...

In the meantime, back where the action is...

Off somewhere in the far off distance, Ogobogo and company continue to ply the waters...moving upstream to the next pool, and with the same trusty spoon, a lovely little scrapper is brought to hand...a beautiful, wild, healthy fish...the smile on Ogo's face says it all...



Basecamp. With gear prepared and anticipation high Fishortho, slamdunk and company were getting ready to tempt the behemoths that lurk below, waiting to test their mettle...finding a nice hole down by the train bridge, they settle in sheltered somewhat from the blowing wind, and cast their gear out into the deeps in which these Dino's rest...

Up in the mountains far away from anyone anywhere, Steelietrav's group makes a decision...mapbook neatly tucked away, the group decides a different jaunt back down to another spot is in order, and a further furlong out on foot will be the trick to finally get their long awaiting fishing lines into the water...by now everyone is beginning to think..."this is a bit too much...", well, it wasn't over yet...

Minutes later the well traveled group arrive at a spot in the trees before the trailhead that they will take to the waters that call below...a hasty gathering of gear and supplies and the gang begin the last leg of their arduous journey...snow, in places a foot deep hampers their every step...the respite from the toil are some tracks laid previously by other insane people before the most recent snowfalls...3.5 kilometers, and approximately 45 minutes later the downhill trek is at its end, and the stream comes into sight, oh so close, but not there yet..."let's catch our breath", someone pants as the group with no place to fish has finally arrived!!! It is about 1130 am...approximately 3 hours+ after the expedition began, and all is now well again...:D

Back on the river, WifeofHeynow, Ogo and Heynow are absorbing the sights and enjoying the places we all here want to protect and show the respect they deserve... Ogo switches his lure of choice to a purple beaded black and orange jig. Several casts into the clear clean pool at hand, keeping his wares up off the bottom and in the fishes sight, a nice 18" cutthroat rewards him for his effort...While one of natures most awe inspiring visions sits watchfully under a tree eying group A and its surroundings waiting for the right moment for a meal to present itself...



Maybe this majestic bird is considering snatching Ogo's beautiful cutthroat? These beautiful fish are a sight to behold, and deserve their freedom more often than not having graced us with their presence. Recent years have shown declines in these beautiful fish. Poaching, habitat destruction and encroachment, el nino, and any number of negative anthropogenic influences, have caused these fish populations to suffer in some areas...careful handling of these fish a release in favor of other species in time might help contribute to returns akin to those of the past...this little beauty slides gently back in the river after a few moments to catch its breath, and will live to carry on its line...

At precisely the same time this little cutthroat gives it's tail a good kick and swims to freedom, far off in the distance on some other precious flow, a float drifts slowly through a pool under the snowy canopy of grandiose trees towering above...Tiny swirls of current meander their way in and around the well drifted float as it makes its way slowly through the pool...Suddenly, the float dives under with the tell tale head shakes of a fish...erupting out of the water a nice chromer cartwheels through the air above the pool, immediately grabbing the attention of everyone in the long lost group called excursion B...

Out on the Harrison...waiting for a monster sturgeon to come by and grab hold of their treats the boys notice a large Bobcat with what appeared to be an injury to his right rear leg, it paid them a visit on the other side of the river, carefully working his way along the foreshore before disappearing into the bush. "I wonder how he got that injury?", someone muses aloud passing the time until the fish wake up for breakfast...

Meanwhile, back to the cartwheels....

Standing in the trees, smoking a cigarette and drinking a nice hot cup of coffee, Ribwart's head jerks sharply to his left as Wagonmaster's line snaps tight with the telltale action of a good fish...Keenly interested he peers down into the water as the bar of silver thrashes about on the other end of Wagonmaster's line...The fish leaps out of the water and spins and turns on a dime, zipping down towards the tailout of the pool...'That's not a coho', he thinks to himself once he gets a good view of this beauty as Wagonmaster expertly swings his fish towards shore..."It's a steelhead...." he exclaims as his mind reels at the chances of that while out hunting coho. "...rest assured everyone in the group had definitely forgotten their epic trek now...Carefully tailing his prize, a quick snapshot is taken to try and capture the beauty of this fish, and cradling it with the care and respect it deserves, Wagonmaster slowly revives this little slab and it gently swims back down into the pool.



A few drifts later and wham! Again with a smart hookset, and Wagonmaster is into another beauty...after a brief but spirited fight and a quick pose with his prize, another precious steelhead is returned to the waters from which it came. At this point it had boggled the minds of everyone there at the surprise of getting some steelies while out looking for late season coho...sometimes our efforts to find good fishing yield great surprises, however this was too good to be true! What a fitting reward for the toil and sacrifice that was made to finally get some fishing in...our good fortune had much to do with being in the right place at the right time, and excursion B was truly blessed to have been lucky enough to find these elusive fish...



After the second of these two beauty fish were carefully released back to the precious waters, the group from excursion B were in high spirits and everyone began to feel the excitement and anticipation of more fish to come and they settled in to work the pool...Ribwart, wookie, steelietrav and marko decide to move downstream a ways and fish some of the pocket water down to a pool below...

Now as the fishing progresses into the early afternoon, over on the other side of the world...

"CRACK!!!!!"...echoes a rifle loudly in the hills nearby as Ogobogo, HeyNow and WifeofHeyNow all look up simultaneously wondering who might be out there hunting in the hills above them...Wondering if their trip is going to turn into the latest scenes from Deliverance II they quickly hear a couple more shots echo through the hills and can tell the hunters are far, far from them and the pools they were fishing...Erring on the side of caution though, and realizing they didn't have the proper garb to distinguish them from the deer that were the target, group A made the wise decision to stick close to the water and in plain view so as not to be mistaken as venison...Due care must be taken when fishing in BC, in some places hunting and fishing grounds can overlap, so for anyone out there in the wilderness please be aware of your surroundings and the actions of others in your viscinity...

But back to their story...

HeyNow and Ogobogo move up and pass through into some pools further up river...WifeofHeynow unfortunately was not feeling well, and decided to take a brief rest from the cold and leave her trusty companions to do the exploring. Ogobogo switches colors, and short floated one of his favourite pink jigs down the run, and down goes the float and he is tied into a nice little coho, about 3 or 4 lbs., after typical coho thrashing and short runs he gets this little prize within about 10 ft. of his wader boots, and the fish spits the jig right back at him with the disdain of a defeated PQ referendum...

At the same time as Ogo's coho is doing the long line release, the whole gang from the long lost group from excursion B has moved down in to some other pools in search of their elusive prey...

Minutes after Wagonmaster has landed and nicely released his third fish of the day, Steelietrav set's the hook on a nice fish...a few good runs, some rolls and a few more good runs, his excitement grows as the fish gets led towards shore...out comes the camera, as he says "I want to get a good underwater shot of this one Rib", and he passes Ribwart the camera with a few brief instructions...and getting back to playing his fish, it spins, rolling about 5 or 6 feet offshore and suddenly the roll succeeds in turning the hook to just the right angle, and off pops the fish!!! "NOOOOOO....", Steelietrav exclaims in disappointment as his fish enjoys the benefits that barbless hooks provide, and it wins its freedom with a clever move..."That would have been my first ever steelie to the beach!", he explains with the reverence and increased heart beat these fish inspire..."but it was so worth it, all the hiking, and driving and slogging through the snow..." he says, and you could tell right away that in his opinion the trip was definitely a success...

Out in the valley, excursion C is slowly realizing there may not be any fish holding out in this pool today...dreaming of warmth and home, they decide to pack up the gear and head back to camp...a warm fire, some food and maybe an early return from the other groups and some stories to tell might just do the trick...

The mesmerizing dance of the water before him smacks of great holding water as he carefully ties a new rig with which to tempt the fish he knows are gliding through the waters before him...The subtle hum of his trusty centerpin floats his terminal gear up and out over the pool landing softly above a fishy looking choppy stretch of water midway through the run...Slowly the sensitive little balsa float drifts unimpeded through the walking speed flow...in a flash the float goes under and he quickly lifts back the rod on a scrappy little steelhead of about 6 lbs that before he has a chance to react has dashed all the way across the river and into the fast water on the other side...dogged runs, cartwheels, flips and spirited twists and turns gets Ribs heart thumping as the amazement he feels at these beautiful fish is quickly refreshed in his memory...moments later an uncontrollable smile creeps across his face as he gazes down at the fish in his hands with the pride, admiration and awe he feels for these fish...'moments like these', he thinks to himself, 'are what it is all about'...



As the day draws closer to midafternoon, excursion A continues plying the water of their beautiful little river...often known for later runs of coho, this river can produce some great fishing and always provides those willing to go there with spectacular views and the solitude that goes with journeys to less pressured waters...

Excursion C walks back into camp to find the fires extinguished...not to mention notices on the vehicles in camp left there by the warden reminding our BCFR group that camping fees have not as of yet been paid...Settling down to business, they get a new fire going and consume a meager fair of hotdogs cooked over the roaring blaze. Suddenly out of nowhere, the warden walks up to camp with a not quite friendly demeanor. The riot act is read, politely, all be it firmly. Ortho explains the details and assures the warden that the others will return some time soon and all will be taken care of...

Finder had to leave to do some errands over in Chilliwack, and Slamdunk had a date. They departed around 2.
At 3:15 with the ceiling lowering very quickly on the mountains, and a wind shift to the Northwest, the thoughts of reconnecting with the rest of the group were getting slim, and so the last remaining member of excursion C decided to stoke up the fire for the last time pull the plug and hit the highway...Thank you Ortho, for putting this all together and for the fire when we returned...

As the afternoon progressed and thoughts began to turn back to the hike back up to the vehicles, the missing group began to think of home...With Marko casting a sharp looking little gold hammered croc on his lightweight set up, and Wookie working the tailout with a hammered colorado blade while the rest of us plied our drift gear through the pool with tired eyes...the last few passes of floats patiently trying to get one more hook-up before the hike from hell mesmerized the group in the peace and tranquility of the silence of the stream running through the forest...Bobbing up and down in the subtle currents of a nice run a float dives under the surface with a nice hard strike, and minutes later, the last of Wagonmasters multiple steelhead is the final shot of a silver bullet in hand before this lovely wild beauty is returned to the river...



With a powerfull swish of its tail, the day quickly winds itself to its inevitable end, the groups that were, break down their rods...all except Steelietrav of course, who's rod was frozen together, and they all make their way back to the main camp, with memories in tow. Visions of the days events and a nice hot bath dance in the heads of our weary travellers, while smiles periodically break over their faces as they remember the views, the fish and the good times they enjoyed that day. Snow is falling in the valley when they arrive back at camp, and the sites are torn down with the regret that comes with realizing all great trips must come to an end...One by one, the members from BCFR climb into their vehicles, and make the long dreamy drive back to the cities from which they came...wishing it did not have to end so soon...

More pictures from the fishout will be posted in the gallery fishout section of BCFR in the near future, at this point it would be prudent to point out that most of the members of BCFR appreciate responsible angling and care for the fish they admire so much....Anyone new to this site, or new to fishing entirely should consider the impacts they have on this resource when they are out fishing our beautiful waters...Please handle our fish with care! Each and everyone you land and release should be respected, not treated irresponsibly in any way. The thrill our fish provide us will one day be the legacy we leave behind for our children and generations to come, please consider your conduct on the rivers and streams of this province and the impacts that conduct might have. Respect and diligence with regards to proper release of these fish will allow for them to wow us for generations to come...

Thank you for sharing your passion for the sport with me,
It was a great pleasure meeting all of you, and I look forward to the next time we can get together around a campfire and share some stories...
Rib










Xmas Steelhead story


Year after year many anglers wait in anxious anticipation of one thing.
The time of year when the presents have all been opened,
the christmas tree stands waiting for you to grant it its final resting place,
and the kids are all gleefully playing with their newly unwrapped toys…

Wives thoughts turn to sales and deals galore,
and husbands having finished shoveling the snow,
sit in their favorite easy chair finally allowing their thoughts to turn to other things…



With the television running in the background,
and the paper fully read,
our minds begin a journey of anticipation as visions of the river drift through our heads.

Suddenly, amidst the reality of our living rooms,
for a brief second we hear the subtle sound of a river echoing around us.



Images pop into our heads at the strangest times…
seemingly randomly, without rhyme or reason...



Visions of clear green pools,
and our gear sailing up and out over the river to settle into a slow meandering drift.

These images are the memories of Steelhead season,
and as the distraction of the holidays begins to fade away,
they flash through our minds directing our thoughts to our winter flows,
and a chrome sea run steelhead flashing in emerald green waters…




Lying in bed at night before the warm, soothing throes of sleep, our minds flash from one image to the next…
the images that speak to us of the perfect drift....

A tiny little balsa float meandering its way through the clear, green water of a nice run, our eyes focused on it with the anticipation of the next fish to take it down.

and we fall into a restless Xmas sleep...





When morning comes, and we've refilled our reserves,
we distract ourselves from the responsibilities at hand with thoughts of the river and our next visit.

Our eyes wander over to the fishing rod, the vest, the boots,
and we start thinking of the our next chance to don our gear,
and answer the rivers that call to us with a far off cry…

Sooner or later the temptation is too much...the steelhead season is getting started,
and we reach for the phone, and plans are made for the first cold trip of the season…

The excitement seems to spread among our little groups like wildfire,
as time ticks by far too slowly till the day finally arrives
that we get our chance at the first fresh winter run of the year...



The morning dark and cold, the street lights glare on our driveways,
we peer out our windows for the foggy beams of headlights pulling around the corner,
signaling the beginning of the trip,
we hastily grab our gear and throw it in the back of the truck.
our eyes scanning over the assembled tools, as a mental list is checked,

…and then a smile, at last, we look up to see the same determined look on the faces of our friends…
the look in the eyes of a steelheader that’s on his way.



A cold morning rush of the cool air through the window chills you
under the soft glow of a cigarette’s reflection in the glass,
the brightness of the city, a far off image in the distance behind you.

The visions flow quicker now, the tenseness of the anticipation begins to build.
Thoughts and discussions turn to tactics. You debate on course of action, and where to start,
as miles of highway pass beneath you.

At last, the coffee nearly done, the misty glow of headlights sweeps across the trees,
as the truck pulls into its awaited spot.
The familiar sound of the river drifts through the path before you,
and you feel as though you move in slow motion.

The warmth of your waders shield you from the elements,
and the weight of the vest rests squarely on your shoulders
signaling the final step towards the path in the trees as
the doors are locked and your pockets checked.

The last sweet weapon, the fishing rod,
grasped firmly in your hands and you’re off with the swift smooth cadence of a determined walk.



Through the dark thick canopy of trees the stars wink at you with the hint of winter morning
as misty breaths catch the moonlight glow. You follow the winding, well worn path through the forest.
Greeting subtle landmarks with acknowledgement as you near your goal.
Step by step the path grows shorter and the thinning of the trees opens up the view you’ve waited for...



...the sound of the river rises loud in your ears and your gaze turns to the run,
and you peer into the depths, reading the water before you.

Analyzing the pool, carefully studying it’s depth and movement,
you see the leading edge of a shelf where the water turns a darker green.
The bottom drops off fast here, next to the trench at the top of the run.
It widens out to a nice even depth and speed towards a tailout, and a riffle.
Faint images of melon sized rocks and current altering boulders peek at you
through the windows in the current, from the river bottom below,

You watch as the pool settles out from the quick, choppy torrent of the main flow
to the soft meandering gait of the current seam, and your spot is picked.

With the patient sense of an angler about to ply his drift, you take an easy breath,
the rod is securely fastened together, and the terminal gear is checked.
Getting the angles set, and with well worn hands, the reel hums as you sling the line out over the pool.

Cold numb clumsy fingers tap the spool twice quick, to drop the gear down into the slot.
With the settling of the float up straight, and the line tight, the drift starts,

and the anticipation begins...



Subtle movements in the float transmit the drift of the gear below.
Bobbing up and down in the meandering currents, the slow smooth journey through the run shows nothing
and the reel retrieves the cast.

Another swing and the reel sings of another cast, and the drift is repeated again.
Then, hesitating, you notice just the slightest change in the movement of the float,
and it teases you with the possibility of a take.

You tense to prepare for the strike. No take, you think, as you relax taught fingers and look to the run again.
A patient retrieve, then quick as a flash the gear sails out and the weight settles down in its place once more.

The float hits the water and before you can think, it has drifted a foot down the trench,
when suddenly, it moves sideways sharply, just the tiniest bit, with the hint of a sampling below.

A powerful, ocean fresh fish slashes at your gear,
slamming your float beneath the surface and the line pulls up tight,
to the strike of a bright chrome slab.
Muted flashes of silver reflect from the pool, the fight is on!!!

Before you can anticipate which way it will go…
it peels off line like a bat outta hell and you know it's only just begun.

The excitement, the thrill, washes over you as you’re finally tied into the first fish of the season.



The chrome bright steelhead powers through the current heading to the top of the pool...
the float points at it like a finger, focusing your will upon it...



...when in the blink of an eye,
it turns quickly and dashes straight downstream using the current to gain momentum...



At the top of the tailout, its run stops abrubtly in a mighty leap,
and a somersault high above the water,
till it splashes down, and straight into another jaw dropping run...

A few more giant leaps out of the water and a couple more tugs of war and you feel the fish take a break.

With a skillful, cautious turn of your rod to the side, you guide the fish close to shore,
heart thumping in your chest with excitement.

Then just as you thought, the fish makes a turn and peels line off again in a run just as strong as before.

The honorable Roderick L. Haig-Brown said it so well when he described the feeling these magnificent fish provide:

"Time and time again I have lifted a fish out onto that little island,
knocked him on the head
and then have had to sit quietly a few minutes to calm my excitement
and still the trembling of my hands.
And all because of the intensity of ten or fifteen minutes with a little fish of three or four pounds at the end of the line;
it seems hard to believe and I always tell myself that I should be getting used to it.
I should be able to take it more calmly.
Yet I never do."




Soon, on its side,
a chrome bullet steelhead comes to hand
and your deep foggy sigh of relief signals the fight is won.
Gently you revive the fish. Patiently allowing the water to flow through its gills,
going through the ritual every steelheader knows.
Fresh clean water invigorates the fish, giving it back its strength when suddenly, with a swift kick of its tail,
it swims back to the depths of the run.

You look up, and the morning breaks as the sun peeks its head over the trees to the east
and you feel alive again in the cold mountain air.
You shake the cold water off your hands and think,
It’s been too long my friend, as you gaze at the river in peace.

You smile to yourself, and take up the rod,
to sit and enjoy the moment before you stand up again in search of more chrome winter steel…
thinking, this is what it’s all about…
















Remembrance day jaunt

Well, I hit the flow this afternoon, arrived at the river around 2 pm and fished till 4 pm, just a short little jaunt today...call it a warm up for monday...met "The Weev" while I was up there, nice to meet ya weev...
The pool didn't seem too promising at first, water clarity was about 2 feet, good volume of flow, cloudy and rainy...But I was already there, so I thought I might as well put my time in right?

Fished some blades...nothing, saw a few fish break water as they came into the pool, passed another blade or two in front of them....nothing. Then I switched it up to a little red and peach wool combo...and concentrated on the tail out on the short float...near the end of my drift I noticed the float had slowed down just ever so much, it just didn't seem like it was moving at the pace it should have been based on previous drifts near the same current seam...so I lifted up on it, felt a tiny head shake, and set the hook....Put up a real nice fight, at first I thought it was a coho, but soon realized by it's fight it was a good clean spring...here's that tailout...




here's the result... :D












Vedder river drought october 2006

Well, as most of us have already read thus far from all the other posts, the current water levels leave much to be desired...but never the less here is my report from the flow.

My friend Vic and I arrived at the river just about first light and started by fishing the canal...hard to believe it, but we were the only people there at the start...then the crowds began to form. We fished parts of the canal for the next hour or so, we hooked into a few chum, a few white spring, but no coho hooked...although scanning the shoreline in and amongst the debris and logs down in the canal I did stop and watch one nice large chrome coho cruise around for a bit in completely slack water, so I know there are some trickling in....and so we decided to move on in search of the elusive pre-rain coho that we thought must be hiding somewhere in this trickle of a river...

We drove upriver, and after a brief stop for coffee, we decided it would be wise to try and find a deeper pool with some cover in which the fish might stack up, even though we would likely have to fight some crowds. Well, by now it was obvious to us that even if we did find such a pool, with the relative higher numbers of whites and dogs in the river compared to coho, that any such pool would be filled with mostly these fish and maybe a few coho mixed in...so it would be tough fishing wherever we went...

So, I remembered a spot I had scouted out during steelhead season where the water levels were far too high and the pool way too deep for efficient steelheading, and thought that it might be perfect under these low water conditions for coho....and as we drove up to it, and got out and looked down at the pool, we saw, much to my disbelief, there was absolutely nobody fishing this big beautiful pool!!!!



We fished this pool top to bottom and, as expected, the majority of the fish were chum and whites... we each hooked into several white spring in and amongst the dogs, and my buddy Vic did keep one nice clean little jack spring for our efforts...I didn't manage any to the beach but did lose one nice super bright chrome fish that was not identified...my 6 lb leader popped on me more often than not, and I think next trip up I'll stay with 8 lb to compensate...




As for the nitty gritty of the report, we fished everything from single eggs, blades in brass and silver, roe, wool, spoons, etc....and really didn't have much to show for it. We fished several good runs in the river without much competition, and came across crowds at several other good spots that we didn't even bother to fish...

We walked some trails into some more secluded spots...



and took a few pictures of successfull habitat restoration projects that provided refuge for various fry...




But with the very low water levels, it was obvious that the fish were stacking in what few deep pools there were and even once you found quality water, the numbers of coho were minimal, in fact I would estimate that the average ratio of coho to chum and springs is likely close to 1 in 100...
These deep pools are also quite crowded, we drove all the way up to the ranger run, as I call it, and there must have been 20 cars parked there....now if any of you know that pool, you know that run can't support that kind of fishing pressure even during high water!!!!!

So, although they are in there right now, the numbers of fish are very low, and you have to find them, as the only coho I saw all day was hundreds of feet away from any other fish, and in slack water, which makes enticing them very tough with gear.

I am sure the fish will keep trickling in, despite the low water, and eventually even if we don't get rain for a while, there will be some coho to be had, but right now there aren't a significant number of coho around. The effort required to find one is far greater than most would be willing to put in, but if you work at it, sooner or later, pockets of coho will begin to move in more and more frequently....and you just might get rewarded with a fish in addition to a beautiful day.

Part 2

Hey adecadelost....Well, here it is...hit the flows on the holiday monday today with the girlfriend and my buddy and had a really great day...

This little venture out to the vedder was more like a part 2 to last weeks trip...last week my friend and I had fished the canal, and various lower to mid river pools with limited success, and so this week the girlfriend tagged along with us, and we decided to start at the upper river under a watchful moon...



It was a crisp and cold morning to start...glad I brought the thermals today...and my patience. Holiday mondays can be just about the worst time to hit the vedder, especially when the water levels are so very low, and fishing spots are so limited...but I was still confident we could find water that was isolated and uncrowded with a decent chance at a coho or two...so we arrived at the upper river with a brief stop in at the hatchery to view the spawning channels and give the girlfriend a little crash course on identifying fish...there were quite a few fish in the channels, mostly coho, with a few springs mixed in...

We then hiked down from our parking spot at about the cement block and fished pocket water until I found a nice little pool with a good trench down the middle of it that NOBODY WAS FISHING! I told the girl that this looked very promising and she immediately scurried down the slope to the rivers edge....
Now, some background info is necessary here, my girlfriend is new to this whole river fishing thing but she loves this kind of stuff, so I have been showing her the ropes so to speak...She's using a little Trophy XL centerpin on a nice lightweight shimano drift rod and is starting to cast it really, really well!!! She's also working on watching the water to spot fish, and read the bottom structure to identify good holding areas, etc...



Well she wasn't too optimistic, but I had her short floating tiny little roe sacs through the trench and sure enough she hooks into a tiny, but manageable, chum salmon for her first ever salmon and plays it quite well until this little doe throws the hook with some acrobatics...now my girlfriend is really keen, and you can tell her intensity level has stepped it up a notch...
next she gets into a little jack spring that was surprisingly clean for that high up river under these low water conditons, but she loses it as well when it swam in between some rocks and wedged her line in tight...by now she was beaming, she really had the nack for this down pat, she was sharp! Nice controlled drifts, no flossing or float dragging, just clean short floated presentations that were rewarding her quite well...

By now she was even getting cocky about the hole fishing thing...and meanwhile I hook into really nice clean white spring, big and almost chrome...I was even more shocked at how clean it was than I was the one my girlfriend hit... well needless to say the girlfriend wants to get a shot of me playing and landing a fish - showing her how its done, so to speak...and well my little 8 lb leader pops after quite a spirited fight...and she pipes up at me and says that she wouldn't have lost it!!!! Here's the look I gave her...



...and my reply was very simply, after lunch we are going to hike into some pools where I know very few people will be fishing, and conditions aren't going to be so easy as they are here, dear 8) , so then we'll see how well you do... :wink:

I want to make special mention to a young boy named Travis that I met today as well...I showed him how to get his snags undone without spooking the fish and then showed him a good spot to short float in and tried and hopefully succeeded in explaining to him how short floating not only prevents future snags, but also doesn't spook the fish if you miss a hook set, or bump a nice fresh coho with you pencil lead...he shortly after that hooked a nice little jack spring, short floating with great skill...nicely done my man! Well, on with the story...

After a brief lunch up by the cement block, and a nice chat with a young guy who had a hatch coho on the beach, we decided to head down towards some pools in the mid river...



There were crowds around, but not in the nice little run I had in mind...the only problem was we were going to fish it from the side that was toughest to cast from...and I mean tough. The three of us were right up against a wall of rocks and dirt and trees with no room for a back swing to cast with... so I taught the girl all about the little flip / tight quarters cast that works well under these conditons, and by the time I was into my first fish, she was slinging that setup right out to the perfect little slot with no difficulty and dropping her presentation right down into the run like a pro!!! I cannot possibly express how awesome it was to see her pull off this technique so soon after being shown how, man was I proud!!!!!!! She didn't manage to get any to the beach, but I know that is just a matter of time...next lesson will be on some of the subtle nuances to playing a fish on the centerpin...
She hooked into several springs, some jacks, some mature...as did I and my friend bubba, but all were quite dark and similar to this one bubba is holding up before release....the cleanest we saw all day, were those mentioned earlier and I think those were an exception to the typical condition of fish in the upper river...BOOTS!!!



The nitty gritty of the report is fairly simple...In that last pool I was in I saw two very nice coho break water in nice clean jumps that left no mistake they were coho and in very good shape...but the coho are few and far between to say the least, and finding them, right now is the hardest part. Those were the only two I spotted in the river all day. I suspect I lost one in that pool on a small brass blade that was so short floated it was almost not in the water, but the fish did not show itself and was off in under a minute of some coho like thrashing about so it was impossible to know for sure...

If you are going to fish the vedder river under these low water conditons, carefully choose your spots, as the coho are isolated and the real key is finding them, otherwise you will likely only hook springs and chum most of the day.

Fish away from the springs and chum, short float with determination, and you will not waste as much time playing out fish that should be left alone. Not to mention you'll likely be more successful at locating and even catching some of these low water, overly harrassed coho that have thus far managed to run the gauntlet of rods on the vedder right now. There are a few in there, and more to come with our much needed rainy season...but keep in mind, crowds of people on a pool is not a good sign of coho!!!!!!!!!!! In fact I would stay away from these spots, as many of the techniques used by novices here will more than likely spook coho and deter them from taking your presentation....fish spots away from crowds of people thrashing the water with viscious hook sets and scaring the scales off your targeted prey... your chances of success will likely improve dramatically. Now that I have done my first couple good exploratory trips of the year, I will be waiting for the rain, but that's not to say success cannot be had with persistence and good technique...
Good luck to you!
Rib

(PS: For those fine fishermen here who already know the truth in the last paragraph....pass it on.)







My four day trip

Well, got back from four days campin it out at the vedder would say it was a nice, rewarding trip despite the cold.... Man, did that wind ever make it miserable out there at times!!!!! :lol: Froze, frozen, wind burned ... you name it, but I toughed it out..... First day was the worst wind wise, got there around 10 am, fished in and around thurston and lost about a 12# doe right next to shore, straightened out my hook if you could believe it! Next day fished hard all day touched absolutely nothing untill the last half hour of daylight when I hooked in to two and landed another nice doe in the same spot as the day before...(sorry no pic, way too cold, at least after tailing her...)My old man and my uncle came up as well but were struggling a lot the first couple of days, as they're pretty green and my dad has a slight knee injury...they weren't around to see my first two hook ups.....and were beginning to get a bit discouraged to say the least. My uncle had to leave and my dad was about ready to, but I convinced him to stay another day as he wanted to leave off early and this is how it went....
Friday was by far the best, fished the first half of the day on the move in a different part of the river, beautifull sunny day, great water and less (not much less, but less) windy than the previous day. Not to mention dad's knee was feeling better....Lost one in one pool, snapped my 6# leader, then during the last half of the day came into a pool I hadn't fished in years. There must've been at least 10-20 holding in there, because over the next two hours I hooked into a total of 7 fish, 4 brought to the beach all wild. I have a pic of my favorite and will post it soon. Dad didn't hook a thing, but you could tell his optimism had peaked now that he was seeing me hit them almost one after the other, and he decided we should stay another day....hah hah hah :lol: :lol: :lol:
I've saved the best for last, saturday morning I armed him with an arsenal of colorado's, roe bags and even a couple of those ugly pink worms (that don't seem to work for me), and wouldn't you know it a few hours in my paps hooks into a beautifull, slightly colored buck about 15 lbs, he played that fish like a whily old vet, while I played the role of nervous onlooker....wow, what a show! :D Well the sad part is, dad lost his fish right next to shore, but it was a great fight and he did very well for his first ever steelie hooked....I think he was just satisfied enough to be hooked on steelheading from here in, and the smile on his face was enough for me!!! He lost another later in the day, and I lost one first thing, and last cast to end off what was in essence a spectacular trip up to the cheddar for the week....I hope all my trips can be as rewarding as this one was... :D
well worth the cold,
rib

This was the one that got my old man hooked on steelies, I think I should have had the camera pointed at him....the look on his face was priceless!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:










Boilermakers derby 2006


Fished the ved sun up till bout 3 ish, one wild to the beach, one lost after a somewhat brief fight,
not one of my best days. Sweetbubbalove also got one to the beach, two lost, surprised he didn't get into more,
He was in the zone!!!!! Watched a guy land a nice approx 13 lb hatch downriver, real [email protected]
See pics below, eye candy for us forum surfers......
Haven't fished the lower river for about 5-6 yrs, was in a derby today with the boilermakers,
so figured my best chance for a hatch would have to be downstream,
but go figure the winner came from above allison!!!!! Hahahahah :lol: :lol:
fyi it was a nice 11 lb doe....all in all a pretty good day despite the lack o fish....
Anyway,I have a date with a beer and a macallan,
hope you're all hitting tons of fish, and wondering where the crowds have gone! :D :D :twisted:
Here are some picks....


unknown guy with nice hatchery


me with sweetbubbalove's little scrapper


and last and definitely least, my cute little tiny steelhead!!!! Hard to believe there's even a fish there,
look closely and you should see it eventually.....thx bubba :D











Crowds lineups and sulking steelhead


The first thing I'd like to point out is that For all the talk of crowds, and beaks and heavy pressure on the good ole vedder, I've come to realize that midweek trips up there aren't all that bad. I have only very rarely fished the river on a weekend and consequently rarely see more than a handfull of guys all day during weekday trips. :D My last outing was a four day trip that ended on sat afternoon, and the difference was obvious! As I hadn't been out more than 4 times in the last 2 years, I had forgotten how crowds could develop around more productive holding water. Friday afternoon I fished with just my dad at three pools all to ourselves except for 1 guy I noticed across the river and downstream, we had a very good afternoon and had all the room in the world! What a joy! Saturday in the same spot were five guys our side of the river casting practically over our heads, and approx. 8 guys spread out amongst the 3 pools on the other side.... The results were unanimously less enjoyable to say the least! :cry: In a pool where I knew there were multiple fish holding, after about the first hour, the fish just became sullen and sulky probably due to the insane amount of gear that was pounding them each and every minute! I was really quite overwhelmed by the fact that nobody gave the fish a break! I frequently give the fish a chance to relax a little, and myself a chance for some hot coffee and a break on the back. Its was obvious to me that if only one or two people drifted through the run at a time instead of 6 or 7 floats bumping into each other the fish may have been more receptive to our presentations and less tight lipped than they had become.Now I know this is probably too much to ask, but maybe just maybe the crowds would be easier to bear if people practiced a little patience. By the end of my stay at said pool, the fish had obviously moved over into the heavy chop where the angles of those of us on our side were not conducive to enticing them to hit....proven by the 3 guys on the other side hitting fish from a better angle. It's unfortunate that these kinds of situations arise on not only the vedder but many of the other rivers, streams and creeks most of us fish, but having said that, usually if you want to avoid the crowds, even on the ved, you can usually do so by moving to lesser known runs, pocket water and trenches.... although this type of fishing can be more difficult at times it can also be significantly more productive on those days when the close proximity of someone less schooled in etiquette, and charm is getting on your nerves.....
All in all I have come to the opinion that if I feel this way about my favorite little flows, less favorite big flows and the encounter of crowds along them, then I must assume others must also face this delemna. It is clear then that although I don't post on much else other than a few high pressure rivers, and choose not to post on more discrete flows I know and love, I cannot fault anyone beginner to veteran for likewise searching out steelhead water that is more pristine and secret,
and less crowded! In fact about the only thing I can do is respect the fact that they have every right to such exploration and research as I do AND appreciate that those that are looking for these lesser fished waters and secrets we hold dear are of like mind, and will therefore fish them with a similar level of respect, conscienciousness and appreciation that I do!
That said for those who do not go hunting for new water, I can only pass on this great little piece of advice that I was given once:
"More casts does not equate to more fish, only better drifts do...and always show the guy next to you enough respect that he doesn't ruin the rest of your day."

:)
Rib








Vedder steelheading march 2006


Well, what can I say? Once again another venture out on the river has ended, and despite the pain my body is feeling after two straight days of steelheading, I am almost sad to be home....
I'll get straight to it....
Fishing overall was really tough!!! There didn't seem to be as many fish as my last few trips, and I only saw two fish hooked while out there...besides ours :D . Water conditions were gin clear, it was by far the lowest I have ever seen the river while steelheading... The rain held off all of wed, as we left van, it was pouring, but out on the river it was just slightly overcast, no wind....we fished hard from about 1130 in the morning till dark. Started mid river at a pool that has been really good to me lately, and saw two wild fish landed and carefully released. Got nothing there and left within 2 hrs to try downriver....We drove down to lickman, and met up with abbyfireguy and bought a reel from him, and it was good to meet him, Thanks abfg, much appreciate the delivery! My uncle, (2nd time steelheading ever), and I walked right past the gong show down there near lickman and fished all the pools down about 2 kms below there and touched nothing!!!! I haven't really been that fortunate fishing steelies down there anyway, and the only thing of note was my uncle taking a dunk in the river trying to follow me across!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol: I told him it was his "christening", and that once you've fallen in the next step in a steelheaders life that is sure to come is a nice chrome steelie!!!! We laughed it up at that, but little did we know.....
Anyway, we stayed in a hotel overnight had drinks at the pub and then decided to hit the river real early in the morning and this is how thursday went....
Thursday was brutal!!!!! We were out there while the moon was still out and it was pitch black....and there was a guy there waiting already!!!! So we fished the same mid river pool for about 3 hrs, and nobody got a thing all morning....at this point I was getting really discouraged, I was sure that that pool would be holding multiple fish, and not even a whiff, for anyone!~!!!!and there were some good fishermen in there.....Well, we decided to get some line on my uncles new baitcaster, as it would only be fitting that he at least try it out while we're there even if we aren't getting anything, right???
Talked to bergler in fred's, (he said I had missed you by a couple hours there britguy), and told him how discouraged I was and he mentioned the next logical choice must be the upper river, and gave me some optimism (thx b) and we proceeded to the upper river which I know well. We drove up to a pool that I'm fond of and sure enough there was a car there, but we thought hell, one car is far better than three, and so decided to hike it in anyway....when we got there three guys and a young child were setting up, but hadn't really fished the pool yet, so uncle and I set in....
Like I said, I was really not very optimistic, but I plugged away at it and really worked a slot hard when, WHAM!!! Fish On!
Nice bright wild doe, about 9-10 lbs slams my hook and the fight is on!!!! It put up a really good fight, multiple acrobatics and runs...untill she turned on her side and I passed the rod and camera to my uncle for a quick pic....cradled her in the water for a bit and she swam away strong as ever to carry on the tradition.....
Now, I mentioned I was discouraged? Well, my uncle hit the pool with renewed vigour after having seen my fight with this fine fish, and you could tell he was in for the whole day!!! :D
We fished that pool somemore, and then hopscotched down from pool to pool in the car untill it seemed we would get no more today, and then it started to rain hard!!!! I thought oh boy this is it, I'm done....
Then I thought of one more pool, that might be worth a quick pass, so we headed down to the rivers edge for one last stand, again :?
I fished some nice water in this pool and was working a short stretch of water when all of a sudden this beauty chromer comes leaping straight out of the water right in front of me!!!!Scared the $%#^%$ out of me! So I look up and yell at my uncle that there's a fish right in here, and who would've thought, it was on the other end of his line!!!!! I couldn't believe it! :D It's so awesome to see someone get their first ever steelie, and even more remarkable when it's only their second time out there, on a new rod, with a new reel and nothing but hope! It's a very rewarding thing to witness, I must say....
Anyway, he brought this fish to shore after a very spirited battled and it was a bright 9 lb wild doe, I tailed it, and removed the hook and made ready to have him release his first ever steelhead....but as he's trying to tail it, she gave a mighty tail shake and gone!!!!! So no pic, sorry guys....I do have a pic of mine though....here's some eye candy for anybody wishing they were there....

All in all, a great trip, and another newbie hooked on steelheading!!!! I couldn't have planned it better.... :D :D :D


"The East/West Connection" (Part 1)

Meandering along the trail through the trees, a caravan of eager young steelheaders peer through the branches at a tantalizing set of slicks through a bend in the river below them. Monstrous immovable boulders hold steadfast in the relentless current, breaking the water effortlessly. Steelhead live here.



Pairing up, the four anglers split down separate paths to the shoreline, picking their way over roots and stones to the river's edge.

One after the another, floats sail out over the water, landing softly into various seams and pockets, drifting slowly through the depths below. Nice bright winter steelhead eyeball their presentations with increasing curiosity, stirring restlessly from their drifting sleep.

Moving with the current towards some excellent looking structure near the shoreline, a nice tight drift drops into a deep slot a few meager feet from shore. The angler tenses as the float bobs around as if in slow motion, that's the money spot right there he thinks to himself...

Nearing the last few feet before a nice sized boulder the float takes a sudden turn to the side, and the rod comes up tight to a blazing quick slash of a fish's tail. A flash of chrome breaks water violently in a vicious turn for freedom...

Peeling line off the reel with awesome runs, an angler holds on tight for a fight with the fish that would soon bring an early end to his day....


One anglers day is done just as quickly as it had begun...

Little did the others know, but today was definitely going to be a good day... ;)



Big Late season Doe


Tune in tomorrow, same time, same channel,
for the next exciting installment from...

...your favorite river... :yummy:




...To Be Continued...





PART 2

"Is it a hatchery…?"

Yup...,"

" I’m keepin her…”, the angler stated immediately.

Guiding the fish to shore, a quick hand tails the nice bright doe for a kill. Some excited talk and a few pictures afterwards and it was the other anglers turn. Hastily he picks up his rod and jumps back up onto a sturdy rock from which to cast.


"The morning run..."

Downstream, the other two fishermen, worked some really nice water to no avail. Tossing blades and roe bags, but not a fish was to be found, or so we thought…

Back to the successful duo…

Swinging the line out over the water, he follows the drift down its path, eyes staring intently at his float…nothing. Quickly retrieving his gear, the angler spots a subtle path in the water, a tiny slick within the larger one around it. Casting out to the top of the drift, the float settles into its line again. Like an aircraft on approach…

Touchdown. “Fish on!”. Line peels off the Islander in sharp powerful bursts as another nice doe takes up the fight….

Expertly playing the fish, enduring several blinding runs down the quickly moving tailout, and turning it back again and again, the moment is finally at hand. Quickly the favor is returned, and another doe is tailed.

“Nice wild doe”,

“Yup, real nice”

Gently cradling the fish in the water they give it a drink, then quickly lift it for a snapshot, before reviving the beautiful fish and sending it on its way.


A nice wild hen smiles for the camera...

By this time, the two anglers downstream had decided to come up and check out what all the action was about. The group exchanges stories and laughs, finally deciding what to do. They would move on to another spot down river somewhere. On their way back up the trail, Steelie99, one of the eastern steelheaders who will from this point onward go by the name of “Steelie101”, decides to fish some of the water that we started at in the morning.


Are they here?

We scoff at him, laughing, nervously hoping we covered that water well enough, and continue on to try a few more spots on the way back to the truck. Within moments Steelie101, begins to work the slicks and, as we are beginning to fish our own water, we hear a muted yell from upstream, and look to see he’s done it again!!!! “Schoolteacher” indeed. Battling what appeared to be a nice sized steelie, soon in between drifts we see the fish is coming to hand. The man’s a machine!!!!


Later, downriver at their newly chosen spot, the group would soon witness something they had only heard of in fairy tales, a mythical creature few, if any, have ever seen… :eek:

Settling into their routine, the anglers work a nice run and all the current seams within their reach. In the middle of drifts, gazing around at the beautiful sights, soaking in the great weather and the sound of the river flowing by, an angler looks up to see Bigfoot bathing in some water downstream and across the river…


"Use soap!"

Pondering this for a moment, the angler realizes there are much more important things to focus on...and that all too often, novice anglers who can't cast well enough wade in too deep to fish!


Tied into a nice sized fish...

…To Be Continued again soon… ;) ;D

Part 3 Tomorrow... :wallbash:



Part 3: The East/West Connection...

Ok...By now you might be wondering what the whole East/West title is all about...

The four of us in this story hit the river last weekend a little later in the day. Dan, (not a BCFR guy), Nates, Steelie101, and myself ended up just off the highway at Reaction Fly and Tackle around 9 am ish. We picked up our new licences, talked flyfishing, drank coffee, looked at pics, and basically lounged about for while. Nates and Steelie101 are Ontario boys with a whole bunch of eastern canada fishing experience. Dan and myself were proudly representing the west coast anglers, while the other two yokels were fishin' it east coast style... ;D

When we finally got to the river it was nearing 10 o'clock, and within minutes of us getting there, Dan, fishing with Steelie101 above Nates and I, got into a nice hatch right off the bat...Then Steelie101 got into one shortly thereafter. All the while Nates and I were fishing some really fishy looking water, but didn't get a thing...But you've likely read some of this already in part 1, so I'll get on with it.



After Steelie101 showed us up, and landed a nice fish in the very same spot Nates and I were fishing unsuccessfully earlier, we all made our way downstream towards some more promising water...Dan had bonked his hatchery, so he and Steelie went down to the truck to get his gear so Dan could head for home. As he was leaving, he and Nates, (the easteners), pointed out that they hadn't worked the water I was drifting at all... ::) Of course I knew this to be untrue because I was watching as one of them drifted through it along with me... ;) But we all felt it was prime water, and agreed it must hold a fish, so I kept at it...besides, I had just figured out there was a subtle dip in the bottom, about 6-10 inches, so I wanted to drop my presentation down in there a few times before I moved on.

Sure enough, a few minutes later, just as I was beginning to think I was wrong about a fish holding there... I felt the tell tail bite of a fish sampling my peach wool tie. The water was flowing quite fast next to the boil I hooked it in and the fish put up a hell of a fight, some video and pics, and soon a nice, slightly colored wild buck was on its way...it threw the hook after several attempts to tail it, but no matter, it was a great fight, gotta love the quick release!!!

With Steelie101 watching as he walked back up to our spot, we sat a talked a bit, and laughed it up...these east coasters aren't all that bad.... ;D Soon thereafter, we settled in to fishing once again.



Shortly thereafter, I looked up briefly in between drifts to see Nates set the hook on a nice piece of steel. This fish just tore off downstream, peeling line off his reel at a torrid pace!!! We all laughed, because the day before steelie101 had chased a fish way downstream to land it, and we had all clearly heard Nates say,
"I won't go chasing a fish like that, that's crazy..."


Click Here!!!: Nates finally decides to go after it...(Video)

Well, he did chase that fish, but not too far...he decided to make a stand a handful of yards downstream, and managed to turn the fish slowly back to him. Foot by agonizing foot, with the rod bent over big time, Nates managed to get the fish up close...It was a beauty wild doe, and big too...what a strong, stubborn fish. After what must have seemed like forever we finally got to watch the fight up close, but minutes later this big fish managed to throw the hook right next to shore, and we didn't even lay a hand on her...

By the end of the day, we had landed a total of 8 fish and lost some as well between the four of us. Everyone had an absolutely great time. It's always good to fish with the good old east coast boys, share some stories and catch some fish. Can't wait till next time, here's one last fishy pic to get your blood pumping...



Thx for reading,

rib


If you've found these Stories, perhaps even found others that have been hidden along the way, let me know about it...throw me a pm! I am interested to know if these are being seen or not.
 
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