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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All Like I said I am new to fly fishing.. :thumbup:
I have been dying for something quite and fun to do so a friend got me started into this :happy:
I went off got me a belly boat thanks Craigs list, Got me the whole set up and advice on flys from a recomended store.

Now my question is??????

I live in South Surrey, where is a good place to get started using this gear. I dont mind driving a couple hours to get there. But
What is a good time of the day?
Some nice local lakes Especaily this weekend may 24 wekend :drunk: I dont mind an over nighter, I just dont want to hike 2 hrs in the bush, a nice lake sort of off the beaten trail accessible by car. :confused:

Thanks
Craig
 

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I was just at Kawkawa Lake, and there's still lots of Kokanee to be caught. Slowly troll a small beadhead olive woolly bugger with some sparkle to it on a clear intermediate full sink line and you should still be able to tie into a few. The lake is only 3 kms or so out of Hope, so it's not that far. When it gets warm, watch out for the ski boats and jetskis though... :)
 
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Hopefully some individuals that know more than I do will help you out beyond telling you to buy a book and drive around and learn by yourself like they did but hey they are the pros and out of our league. Try Mike Lake in Golden Ears park, great little spot that is stocked. Whonnock Lake out this way is also good. Both these will allow you to practice casting, changing gear and flies and you should get into a fish or two. Hope this helps. :beerchug:
 

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I would also try out Mike lake because the fish there gear onto the bugs alot quicker than inner city lakes. its also very small and easy to get around on a float tube. You could also try Lafarge in Coquitlam, it might be getting stocked yet again before the long weekend
 

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I'd reccomend going for a drive up to any Merritt area lake. There are a ton of them and most are usually very productive. (Gillis, Stump, Roche, Douglas Lake Ranch, etc)

Try fishing off the edge of shoals with a chronomid pattern under a strike indicator.. #14 with black and copper ribbing works well.. or try trolling a black leech while kicking around the lake..

Expect some days where you won't catch anything, just keep trying.. eventually things will click.. its' called fishing, not catching.

More importantly, just enjoy the 'great escape'.. and good things will happen.

Also, you might want to check out the outing June 5 weekend.. a bunch of BCFR members are meeting up there.. I'm sure you'll learn allot from these guys.

Good Luck and Enjoy!
 

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While it it true you should expect days without fish, do not settle for days without fish. Pay close attention to what you are doing both when you are catching and not catching and look for clues on how to eliminate those days. Read all the books you can...How to Fish Trout Lakes by Chan and Morris, Fly Fishing small Lakes by Gordon Honey, The Gilley by a collection of local authors and get your hands on any of videos or dvds you can about lakes.

Everyone will have different opinions on what is what and when to do what and how to do what. I was lucky enough to get about 30 days on lakes in my first year of fly fishing (well first year of fishing period) and about 65+ on the second. I also spent some time with a guide who taught me a lot. Now I know what I do that works and leaves very few disappointing days. Frustrating days where what fish I do get seems more like good luck...yes. Days where I realize I know enough to catch lots of fish some days only a few fish other days...Yes. Does this mean I have a ton left to learn and must work to fill this void of knowledge...YES.


I may start some debate or get some criticism for this but....skip trolling. To much chance...not enough precision in my opinion. In my opinion it is tough to to troll at an accurate speed ensuring your fly is in the zone (first two feet off the bottom) and then hope to be where the fish are and they will be into what you are offering.

Somewhere on here I posted the style of chironomid fishing I utilize. It is all very similar but there are variances within it. Type of leaders, indicators, determining depth etc. I will try and post a link to that thread.

Best advice I ever got and use unconditionally...fish where there is moving (sipping, rolling or jumping) fish. Moving fish are happy fish...happy fish are feeding or willing to feed fish.

Now I know why I haven't written a book on fishing...it would be more like a book of riddles.

Good luck and congrats on choosing a great sport; past time; hobby; passion; obsession; illness...

http://www.bcfishingreports.com/forum/index.php/topic,7121.msg65136.html#msg65136
 

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Boy you have opened up a can of worms Clutch.

You are going to get different answers from everyone, because it seems to be that once a person experiences some success they like to think themselves an expert. I am far from being a master but I do get paid to teach this stuff which make it in my best interest to see my students succeed. So here is what I suggest.

Start with a dry line: they are the easiest to cast and control.

Go fishing as often as you can. The more you have a fly in the water the better your odds.

When not fishing read, read, read; but don't wast you money on books that don't work for you. Find authors you like, the information is all basically the same, but everyone's delivery is different. Check the books out at the library or chapters before you buy.

When you are at the lake take notes. My philosophy is "study, practice, and perfect. So question everything and analyze everything. Everything factors into fish feeding behavior.

When fishing troll some and cast some. While trolling use your powers of observation and your developing analytical skills to determine formulas for success.

In the beginning stick to simple proven generic flies. Black Gnat, Tom Thumb, Baggy Shrimp, black or olive Wooley Buggers, Royal Coachman Adams, Doc Spratley, Halfback, 52 Buick, or Carey Special.

Evenings are often the most productive time. Look for rising or active fish and focus on those areas don't waste your time on dead water.

I suggest Whonnoch lake as a good starter here in the lower mainland.
 

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and the ones that wont tell just make sure to say something funny about their secret fly and then turn around and out fish them :happy: :happy: :happy: I have done this many times and then when they ask what im using i tell them sorry info given is info recieved :beerchug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Guys, I will try to digest al of this....
Me and a buddy of mine went to Folley lake, Got skunked sort of did get one one a cronniment but my newbee hook line tying wasent the best and the hook got loose.. Oh well.
Couple things on Folley
1 its was turning over so muddy :wallbash:
2 Frekon cold, my feet were ice after 4 hrs in the water.
3 be weary of your gas in your trucks with out locking gas caps some turd while we were in the water syphoned my tank, had just enough gas to get to the station.. Live and learn Canadian tire here i come.. :pissed:
 

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Analysis:

Cold water = slow fish. The colder the water the lower the oxygen content. Also since fish are cold blooded like reptiles, the colder the water the slow their metabolism is. The slower metabolism equates to slower digestion, meaning less feeding.

Turn over = poor visibility. Bright flies for better visibility; Bloodworm, Red Spratley
 

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Sorry to hear about the tough conditions - particularly about having your fuel stolen! Good suggestions newsman. Also, you can try changing location (elevation) and hitting a lake that either has already turned over, or hasn't turned over yet. The only other option I can think of is......yard work! (LOL - stole that one from Gordon Honey. Check out his article on summer doldrums from the BC adventure site!)

Btw - where is Folley lake?
 

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Check that...I found it. :) Near Chilliwack. I can't find information on the lake's elevation - but I'm certain that the lower elevation lakes in the Lower Mainland have turned over by now. I hit one a few weeks ago and the water temp and clarity were fine - as were the recently stocked rainbows that tend to be quite gullible... ;)
 
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