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Thinking about upgrading my downrigger rods and have a question about length. I currently have two 8'3" convergence rods which work well enough, but I was wondering why a lot of people use 10'6" mooching rods with their downriggers. I know the shorter rods are easier to use in a small boat, but what are the advantages of the longer rods?
 

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If you want to feel the fish, control the fish around the boat and put the pressure on, the action and power of the 10'6" is superior
 
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Just bought some 11' 6 g loomis rods for coho gunna try me few weeks , and upgraded to 2 10' 6 g loomis rods for spring .
 

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What model number are you getting in the 10'6" gloomis? Is it a BC model rod with the "C" handle?
went with the long butt .... So I cud jam it in my gut when I got a fat spring on there , short butt for the 11'6
 

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I've been using the SAR 1265 in the BC rods and they perform excellent. I have a SAR 1266 which is the heaviest salmon rod they carry.

When selecting the rod SAR-means salmon rod, the next numbers are going to be the length in inches- 125 inches = 10.5 feet long. The last number is the most important one IMO and that's the power of the rod. In 10.5 rods you can get powers from 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. (I could only find a 6 power in a casting/drift rod). The higher the number, the more backbone the rod has. IMO you can use a 1265BC and you will have no problems bringing in any sized salmon in the ukee area I fish in.
 

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The 1265 BC rod is the rod that one of my work associates is going to get. The 1264 BC seemed to be a little light for larger Chinook fishing. I still find my Fetha Styx Motor Moocher the best rod I have ever used. It has a cork handle that i have had to repair and have just put on a shrink wrap grip. First time using the shrink wrap and I am very pleased with the results. The cork just didn't hold up in the down rigger rod holder. I also have the newer Chrome Mooching rod that is a fantastic rod to use up North on Vancouver Island. If you are looking for a quality rod check out the Fetha Styx line of rods.
 

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I like the longer mooching rod because otherwise it feels like you're using hali gear. You shouldn't muscle a salmon, not for long, anyways. For me it has always been for the better feel of the fish, and I'm less likely to horse one in with a lighter rod. That's what's maddening if you should ever fish in Alaska. They use level-wind reels, and shorter, stiffer rods. I understand that guests have to take fish home, and heavy, IMO 'unfair' gear pretty much assures you can just winch them in. Once-a-year anglers tend to not care, or not know the difference. No knock on them, but the seasoned, experienced salmon fisherman appreciates the thrill of, and skill required to boat a fish on the lighter tackle. I like knowing that I have to think my way through a fight to insure getting them into the tub. Sometimes you win, sometimes you tip your cap to the slab.
 

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I've been using 8' rods for salmon for years and they don't seem to make landing fish any easier. The lack of flex makes it tricky to keep the line tight if the fish turns, or jumps. I think the greatest difference in difficulty comes from the reel. I'll never switch from single action. Double action takes all the fun/skill out of the equation.

I got the rods when I had a very small boat and have yet to upgrade. I'm thinking of going with 9'6" ugly sticks. Fairly inexpensive at $67 each, and they feel pretty limber.
 

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I run old school daiwa KGX 11 foot rods. love em and hopefully will never need to replace em.
when I got into salt fishin I had short rods too, all 9footers and suffered the same problems. that all changed with the 11 footers ;)
 

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I've been using Shimano 10.5 ft downrigger rods for close to 10 years. I agree with the others who have commented on the advantages the longer rod offers. One disadvantage I've noticed is that the long rod makes it hard for kids and newbies to figure out how to get a fish close enough to net. I usually need to take over at some point or watch another breakoff.
 

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I use both 9-6 and 11, th shorts are nice for solo work and the longer one's defiantly have more action but I guess I am a gear pig
 

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How big is your boat (beam) and do you fish alone or with a friend? I build alot of rods for use with MR3's and mootching reels in general.
There is a pretty good variety of blanks available for downrigger use, and the right one (or two) for you depends on a variety of factors.
 

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The 10'6 rods will only give you an advantage if your boat is big enough to allow for it. As you're familiar with your boat and the 8'3" rods, can you imagine any difficulty from 2' extra feet of rod? Specifically when netting? In a smaller craft (especially a 14'-16' OR a boat with a small deck) a 10'6" rod may put less fish in the cooler if you can't get them netted.
 
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