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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been out to the mouth of the Adams river twice since it opened on the 1st of June and so far the usually legendary fishing has been slow. On the 1st I went out with a partner for 5 hours in the morning fishing muddlers, epoxy minnows and bucktails. One fish of 14 inches to the boat and a couple of strikes and that was it. On Sunday I went back out by myself at first light and boated a 22 inch fish on the first cast, it took a epoxy minnow on the surface. Nice fish, but scrawny for its length. Nothing for another hour, and then a large northern pikeminnow took a rainbow trout pattern bucktail on the sinking line. One more 14 inch fish in hour three then quiet again. After about 8:30 in the morning visible surface activity had essentially shut completely, so I packed up and fished the River for a bit and managed to land a 26 inch rainbow in a side channel before going home.
It has occurred to me that the pace of fishing and the shape of the fish may be the result of the crash in the sockeye run last year. Fewer returning salmon means less eggs in the fall and fewer alvin in the spring. Some food for thought anyway. Hopefully the fishery will start to pick up a bit soon.
 

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It has occured to me that the pace of fishing and the shape of the fish may be the result of the crash in the sockeye run last year. Fewere returning salmon means less eggs in the fall and fewer alvin in the spring. Some food for thought anyway. Hopefully the fishery will start to pick up a bit soon.
Good report and your observation is bang on, the crash in interior salmon stocks affect everything from bears to trout to tree growth.

Salmon are the nutrient superhighway from the rich waters of the ocean into the interior, with the stocks crashing there will be many other impacts.
 

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Hey nathan thanks for the report! Great to hear some news from that storied spot!
Perhaps the rainbows were scrawny because they are still on the mend from spawning themselves? Or perhaps it's still early and they'll fatten up in the coming month.

I do fear that you may be right though...sigh.

Cheers!

-Nathan in NW
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey nathan thanks for the report! Great to hear some news from that storied spot!
Perhaps the rainbows were scrawny because they are still on the mend from spawning themselves? Or perhaps it's still early and they'll fatten up in the coming month.

I do fear that you may be right though...sigh.

Cheers!

-Nathan in NW
I agree Nice one that it may be a little early still, and the fish probably are on the mend but the fish I caught seemed to be on the very lean side of the bar. I'll be there a couple times a week for month or so, I update if they start to show a bit better fitness.
 

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Hey Nathan, I noticed similar things last year and the year before, although it sounds a bit worse off this year by your account. Over 4-5 days each year the fishing was somewhat spotty, however we did enjoy a couple good days of 10-15 fish. Much like cutty fishing that fishery, they come in feed and then disappear. Difficult to stay on top of them at times...lots of standing and waiting.

I kept a few fly rods handy, one floating line and one slime line for the surface and shallows action when they were on top of the shelf feeding hard, and then another rod with a full sink that I would work the deep drop off with.

I found a few fish were to be had even when they weren't showing themselves if you used the outflow current to swim and sink your fly and then did a slow retrieve, although the most productive was by far when they were actively searching for fry on the shelf.

As for mending/spawning fish, I've always found a few to be around, but the majority caught were well past their spawn and recovery.

You might try some other attractor patterns as well, one year despite the presence of the fish it seemed the only fly they wanted was a gold bead head olive/green wooly bugger with sparse strands of crystal flash tied along the body into the tail and some black silly legs tied into the body on the drosal and ventral plains. Seems stupidly simple I know, but it's funny how picky they can get, that one year they would barely even look at any of the regular staple patterns and would only take the bugger. Made for a great day once we figured that one out.

Thanks for the report and keep us posted, it would be a sad thing for this fishery to go downhill...

:cheers:
 

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I would say you were too early. I have fished that run many times and found it to be like many fisheries that cirulate around salmon runs and are temperature specific. When it is hot there is no mistaking it, the water literally boils with large rainbows chasing down fry. Those who know hone their casting along with speed stripping skills. The bite explodes on the surface here, then there, then on the other side of the boat. Five feet, twenty feet, then thirty feet away in the oposite direction. It is an adrenalin rush. Wait, cast stripp as fast as you can, pick up and fire at the next boil. When I took my brother-in-law there, he didn't fish for almost an hour as he turned his head back and forth, in all directions, repating I can't belive this.
 

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Has anyone recently fished the Adams? From the mouth in the Shuswap to the Bridge out towards Lee Creek(the new bridge) Fished it about a month ago with limited sucess, only a couple and they were small. Hoping to fish it possibly this weekend wondering if there are any reports out there, and what flies are you using
Thanks everyone
 
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