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The yellow tip is the floating tip, and the clear is the "intermediate" or "ghost tip" slow sinking tip. With the various darker more aggressive tips, one way to check to see which ones sink faster is that the more aggressive (faster) the sinking rate of a tip is, the skinnier it is...so your Type VIII tip will be the skinniest one of the bunch.
 

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Remember that it's the colors of the loops that identify your line, not the color of the tip itself. So even though your floating tip is indeed yellow, you also have a greenish colored tip with a yellow loop. That's your type 3 sinking.

Do you not have a reference card with your lines...?
 

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Roe_Pig said:
What is the ghost tip generally used for ? Is the yellow (floating tip) type 3 ?
The all yellow tip (not just yellow loop on a brown-grey tip) is a floating line extension. The grey/brown tip with a yellow loop is a type three. Another nice feature, especially if you have a numberf of differnt weight versatip lines, is the marking system on the loops. There are a series of black stripes on the tips indicating the line weight. A wide black band represents 5 and each narrow black line represents 1. So my tip with a thick black line with 3 narrow lines indicates an 8wt, while mine with a thick line and 4 narrows is for my 9wt.
 

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Straight from my Reference Card....

Clear Loop - Intermediate - 1.5-2ips
Yellow Loop - Type 3 DC - 2-3ips
Grey Loop - Type 6 DC - 6-7ips
Green loop - Type 8 DC - 8-9ips

There is alos a Salmon Loop colour - Type 2 DC - 2-3ips but this tip was not included in the group I got but I'm not sure if it is included in others???

The completely Yellow line is the floating tip as mentioned by others already.
 

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I have the 9wt ones that are 15ft long. Could this be too long for rivers? I was getting out-fished today by a guy who had a 6ft sink tip. I realize they are many variables... However, when he gave me a bead-headed fly he was using, I did hit a nice hatchery 'ho. I am new on the fly & my technique is not the greatest. Is shorter better?
 

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wading to fish, it really just depends on conditions, but I do find very often most guys try to hit the far bank. When coho's and other species will wait until the last moment to hit a fly. You can make your own tips, don't hack up the ones you have.
 

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A shorter sink tip will allow the tip to sink slower because of the length...

ex: If he had a 6ft 7inchpersecond sink tip, and you had a 15ft 7ips sink tip, yours would sink fast and deeper.

Simply just put on a slower sink tip if your finding your sinking too quickly.
 

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Actually, both tips will sink at the same rate, but the longer tip will continue sinking longer and go deeper. I agree tho', if your hitting bottom too much just change up to a slower rate sink tip. Generally you should be feeling the fly ticking the bottom, but not pounding the rocks and snagging them constantly. If that is happening change to a slower rated tip.
 

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it also may have been the water you were fishing if it was only 6-7feet deep in the run he was infact drifting with his tip completely hanging straight down and yours would still be swinging in the current. my line has a 13' sink tip on it and works great another way to avoid snagging bottom is to just cast straight across from yourself or even down river a bit it will do the trick if your to lazy to change tips.


HOOK
 
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