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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Sage VT 2, 6 Wt. would you consider this rod to be a fast or medium action rod. I have been watching, u tube and learn and get good at casting this year. Is this a good rod to learn on?
 

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The VT2 replaced the VPS which is a considered to be a "medium/fast" action rod. Like the VPS, the VT2 is a mid-range Sage rod. They gave it a nice blue finish for some "bling bling" action. Anyway, the VPS is an easy casting rod with plenty of backbone. Not as nice or smooth as the SLT, or as crisp as the XP, but a very fine rod nonetheless IMHO. As for learning, I imagine the VT2 would be a fine rod to learn how to cast. It has a faster action than the old DS2 series (now Launch) which I found has a somewhat "forgiving" timing window. Just get out there and with experience, you'll get the feel of the action and how to make the most of the rod. Also, you may want to consider a casting lesson.

The VPS was actually the original RPL which was Sage's premium fast action rod back in the day. I'm assuming that the VT2's action should be similar to the VPS - but I've never casted one before. Seems to make sense though - since the Z-axis is the new XP (both fast) and the ZXL is the new SLT (both smooth med/fast action)...
 

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Basically what FFM has said...it's considered a "deium/fast" action by modern standards. It's an excellent rod to start on, you made a good choice. In fact, you'll most likely keep that rod for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Flyfishin Magician and stone
Thanks for the info. I am six years from retirement, and moved out to Chilliwack recently. I bought the Sage rod, the Islander reel, with the Rio Versi Tip line. I want to fish Coho on the Vedder with it. Last year I went up to the Skeena River, the first week in August with the Sage 6 WT. The Coho fishing was UN real; it was like being in the Fraser with the pinks running. I caught 6 northern Coho on that rod and I am not very good at casting.

I am having problems with the roll cast. Would it be easier to learn fly-casting with a double tapered weight forward fly line, or is the Rio a good line to learn on?
 

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Fullahead:

That's awesome! Fishing experiences like that are what good memories are made of!

As far as the roll casting goes...it's not that easy a skill to master. Heck, I'm not that good at it either, but to be fair, I don't use it all that much. Having the right amount of line on the water as an anchor, timing the stroke to maintain line tension, and ending the cast so the tip is not too low all play factors in a roll cast.

For regular flycasting, learning on a WF line will be easier than on a DT because you will be able to load the rod with less line out of the tiptop, IMO. Your RIO Versitip is a great line.
 

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I give a second thumbs up for the Rio versitip system. As for roll casting (or any casting), a WF line is easier than a DT (like Stone said). One advantage of a DT is that you can take it off and re-spool it (reverse) and use the other side of the line (not sure you can do this with a multi tip system :-\). In my experience, roll casting is also more difficult with a heavy sink tip - which is what I use in the Vedder system. A 6 wt might be a bit light - particularly if you end up hooking into chum and springs which will be around when the coho are in. I normally use an 8 wt RPL+ when the springs/chum are in and sometimes I get a bit worried about the strain I put on that rod. I've used a 7 wt XP when targeting coho (btw - this rod is perfect for small salmon like pinks) but when I hook a spring with that rod, I almost immediately point the rod at the fish and break off. Better than overtiring the fish or breaking the rod IMHO.

Your trip to the Skeena sounds like it was awesome! I haven't had a day like that for coho on the Vedder since '03 (thanks to FishFinder for the location tip ;)). We were fishing frog water and coho were taking small minnow patters on the retrieve. Even that wasn't like hooking pinks! I think I recall hooking about a dozen coho in a day. My best days were back in '01 when it was a fish-a-cast...all chrome springs or coho. Also did extremely well with the fly in the Chehalis in '03. Just when I thought it couldn't get any easier, the coho numbers drastically were reduced in recent years. Switched to the gear rod and did OK. FF still hasn't forgiven me yet - even if he was one of the guys who helped me learn the gear stuff! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fellows, you have answered my question as far as the weight forward line being easier to cast. I have been doing some reading, and watching a lot on u tube and video as well. I have been practicing the double haul in the back yard, getting the rhythym and coordination down. I must say it is starting to come.

As I already mentioned I have the Sage 6 WT I am practicing with. I also have a Martin Mohawk River 9 foot 5 weights, and I am practicing with as well. Now you fellows were saying the Sage is medium to fast action, and a good rod to learn on. For a guy tying to learn this, I find this interesting. In the back yard last night watching the back cast, with the two rods, the Sage is crisp and fast, the Martin is a lot slower to load, soft action. I am just starting to see the difference. I’m going to use the Sage for lake fishing this summer and try it for Coho this September, to get better at casting this year.

If I find I want to go up to an 8 WT, do you guys use a single or a double handed fly rod? I’m thinking by the time I get the single hand casting down I would probably stick with it. I am going up to Tunkwa Lake and talk to you later. Thanks for the info.
 

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Fullahead: If you're mostly going to be doing a swing presentation, nothing beats a double hander. Very efficient method that allows you to have your fly cover lots of water, while also remaining in the water more (no more false casting). If you're going to be casting and stripping flies, then the single hander has the advantage. Overall though, if it's your first medium weight rod, I would tend to recommend the single hander as it is more versatile.
 

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"Sage" advice Stone...no pun intended! Yes, the transition to a larger wt single hander will be much easier. I prefer a fast action rod for salmon/steelhead over the med/fast action for stillwaters. The double hander does have its advantages - of which Stone's already mentioned. Another big advantage is that virtually no back cast room is needed. I still have yet to make the switch...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Flyfishin Magician & stone

Just got back from Tunkwa Lake. Casting with the 6 wt Sage is coming along. One think I have noticed is when I get a fair amount of line in the air, you can now start to feel the rod load better, with the more line you have out. I can shoot about 35 to 40 feet with the wind behind me, it’s coming. I have a reel that came off my 5 wt that has a 6 wt. sinking line on it. I find that it is easier to cast and I seem to get more distance with this line, compared to the Rio versitip line. But I think this will change as I gain experience.

I am listening to what you guys are saying, the 6 wt I will use it as a lake rod. When I bought the Sage I bought an Islander 3.6 reel. I believe this reel is rated for 7/8-wt lines. To use this reel on a lake would be a waste because it has a great drag system. I would like to use the Islander on the new 8 wt. You fellows were saying casting with an 8 wt it is easer to feel the rod load; the line is a little heavier. I want to buy a medium weight rod, to use on the Vedder for Coho, Chum, and you know you are going to hook into the odd spring, and the Fraser for pinks and down the road Sockeye.
Can I use the Islander 3.6 reel on the 8 wt? I will buy the Sage, which rod would you suggest? What line would you suggest I buy? Line choices: weight forward sinking tip, or the Rio versitip line? I think the guy that sold me the Sage and Islander was thinking that I might want to upgrade at a later time as I think the 3.6 could be used on the 8 wt.
There are so many choices out there and this equipment doesn’t come cheap. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Well, first off how was the fishing? Or did you post a report in Region 3? If not - please do so... :thumbup:

With respect to casting, you'll get the feel! Remember, to help load the line, do a single or double haul. As for feeling the line load, for me it really doesn't matter what the wt of the rod is - as long as it is properly balanced. As for which rods to suggest - I'd recommend going to a fly shop and trying out the different rods and see which ones are right for you. I admit that my salmon and trout fly rods are Sage rods - but there are other fine rod companies out there too. I recently looked at a G Loomis GLX 9 wt and couldn't believe how light it was!

If you're fishing for salmon in rivers like the Vedder - go with the Rio versitip (or similar system). It's critical to have the ability to change tips to suit the water conditions. Just my 2 cents worth. ;)
 
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