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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
In my recent research on the rod, ive located a forum with lots of first hand users. One even said he sold his TFO's because the construction on this rod was just so good... :confused:
Its apparent more research is necessary.
 

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I've got the 6wt. and it is a great stick for the money as well. I sold 3 other Saggees but held on to this one because it's pink season. I wouldn't say it's a beginner's rod but it is a good rod for one, if you get what I'm trying to say. Throws line with ease, can chuck multiple line weights, big streamers, and plop dry flies down no problem, so it is a fine enough rod that you can fish with for life. Whereas with a TFO you will likely be satisfied for a short period of time only to develop an inferiority complex at some point and feel the need to sell it.... but maybe that's just me... But like I said.... go cast them both and then make YOUR decision. :cheers:

*One other noteworthy point is that from my short experience with Sage rods is that if you take care of them and decide to sell at some point you will lose very little money. The demand is so high for them on the market. If you can find good deals on used ones as I did... you will lose no money...and you might even make some. :thumbup:
 

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Sage rods are all pretty much of good quality no matter which series you buy...of course price will reflect the amount of technology in the blank and components themselves. I think the more important question would be: "What type of rod action do you feel most comfortable casting...slower or faster?" I personally like softer rods, especially for my trout gear 6wt and under, but feel equally comfortable bombing out large flies and heavy sinking tips with my stiff steelhead and salmon rods. Not everyone can be comfortable with both types of actions, and you should really take the opportunity to test cast rods that you are interested before buying them.

From my experience so far...softer rods are initially more forgiving for the beginning caster, but eventually requires a lot of skill to take full advantage of the rod. Fast rods can make a beginner look like a hero up to about 60 feet...but if the wind picks up or if you want to cast the whole flyline, a fast rod can quickly show you all the casting errors that you may have.
 

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reelangler said:
Thanks for all your feedback so far.

Does anyone know a shop that will let me "test-drive" rods?
Hi Reelangler:

The guys at M&Y have lots of demo lines loaded up on reels to let their customers test cast flyrods on the grass. If you talk to Bergler, I'm sure he can arrange for you to test cast rods that you may be interested in at Fred's. ;) Darryl sometimes has lines with him that you can use to cast rods on the grass in front of the shop at Reaction.

If you're in Langley and want to cast RL Winstons...I have a bucket full of them in my closet. ;D :beerchug:

Stone
 

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HOOK said:
you have a bucket full of RL Winston rods at home Stone?

do you use them or you looking to part with any?

HOOK

do you have any under a 5wght
Hi HOOK:

The Winstons in my current collection are pretty much "keepers" that I regularly use. I have already weeded out the ones that I didn't enjoy much (9' 6wt LT5, 9' 5wt BL5, etc.)...which proves a point that not ALL rods made by one manufacturer are good, but there are gems in EVERY manufacturer's collection somewhere. And you'll have to pry my 4wt IM6 from my cold dead hands. ;D

:beerchug:
 
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