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The University of Massachusetts Amherst is collaborating with angling groups to collect data on recreational fishermen's interactions with sharks. Recreational angling for sharks is becoming a popular leisure activity worldwide. Sharks are also landed as bycatch when recreational anglers target other fish species. Given the important role sharks play in marine ecosystems, developing a better understanding of when recreational anglers encounter sharks and how they handle sharks once landed is important for their conservation and management. Please consider taking this short survey that begins to compile angler-based information regarding sharks.

The survey is anonymous and no materials will contain the name of this forum or any individual's name.

Shark Survey:


Contact information for the researchers is available in the survey and we are happy to answer any questions about the purpose of the survey or survey questions. We will also provide the data to interested organizations and individuals.
 

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Do recreational fisherman catch sharks often? I'm curious to know. I have read some past threads about salmon sharks. Unfortunately, I don't spend enough time saltwater fishing to have ever seen one. Unless you count dogfish. If anyone has caught a shark while sport fishing, let us know. Type and size too if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi - It definitely depends where you are and what you are fishing for. About 90% of our respondents have caught a shark (target or bycatch) at least once and 55% have targeted sharks.
 

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Wow. Whats more than I would have thought. I'm not sure why but it surprises me. What would be the species most caught do you think?
 

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Haha. Just noticed your location. I'm looking for info for the BC coast.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Sharks that are caught in BC include: dogfish, salmon, and basking

Living on the east coast, but I've done half of my fishing on the west coast.
 

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Don't forget blues and six gills as well.

I know in the regs it does or did mention reporting basking shark sightings but as they are a plankton feeder if many are caught unless a foul hook. That's a big ass fish to haul in!
 

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Very rare to catch the later two....Pls respond to PM.

Cheers Marko
 

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Sharks that are caught in BC include: dogfish, salmon, and basking

Living on the east coast, but I've done half of my fishing on the west coast.[/QUOTE


Blue sharks are quite common also off the B.C. coast.
Had them swimming in my wake while trolling many times.
 

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That's insane. A lot brighter than I would have expected. How long was it? How did it fight? And did you catch it off shore or closer in? Man, am I envious. Catching a decent sized shark is a fantasy of mine. Had a close look at that spoon. Is it bent from the shark or does it just look that way?
 

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I will be watching the water as I troll around. Last trip at ukee my buddy spotted a bright blue shark just swimming along side of our boat as we trolled along. It looked to be about 4' long just cruising at the same speed we were going. It wasn't afraid of our boat at all. It stayed there for about a half minute then turned and slowly disappeared. What a beautiful colour, an amazing bright blue back on those sharks.
 

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How far out were you when you saw it? Wonder if casting a large plug would have enticed it to bite?
 

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Caught a beautiful 4-4.5ish foot blue off Kyuquot 2 years ago; had a light baitcasting rod dragging a spoon near the top and the rod was sitting in a rocket launcher of the radar arch. Had 2 other rods down on the riggers.

All of a sudden I look up at the baitcaster and it has line peeling off like crazy......I thought it was just a big coho, haha. Was I wrong, I looked down for a moment and my buddy saw the tail on the surface about 50 meters behind the boat....he just leaned over and said "sh...sh....sh....sharrrrrrrrrrrrk". :p But fought it like crazy and it was fun on that little rod, got it right to the boat.

And yes......the "blue" on them is amazing. 8)
 

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Caught that 1 80' down w/a Superior spoon (un-damaged). Available from Magic Lures in Port.
There were others cruising the surface but could not get close enough to cast to.
Did not put up a great fight, Thought it was a small hali till it got close. Glad I had long (12") pliers!
Oh yeah, roughly 6' long
 

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I know that some will poo hoo this but?

Unfortunately so called "Dog Fish" or Spiny Dog Fish are a precious resource on the west coast and very much need to be treated with real respect for a change considering most specimens over 36 inches in length are as old as Fraser River Sturgeon.

They do no reproduce like Salmon, they like all sharks, live birth and their reproduction rate and survival rate is a big UNKOWN.

"http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/SeafoodWatch/web/sfw_factsheet.aspx?fid=189" Please simply REMOVE quotes then cut and paste into a new browser tab to use this link as my links are all moderated out for being redirecting.

At one time "Dog Fish" were a pit roast feast specialty of most of the coastal Natives. As such were well regarded unlike the reputation they now have. The BC coastal spiny dog fish do not have as much of a problem with heavy metals in the liver, blood and kidneys as the Atlantic Coastal dog fish so are a real food resource that no doubt will become commercially viable soon because of world wide fish population declines. Same thing as Pink Salmon, the natives used it to dry and fresh cook and serve with grease as well as slow steam pit cook with different flavourings like wild ginger and licorice fern.

I have often thought of doing a traditional dog fish feast as a shore lunch. Where there is some dry rot fir to balance any ammonia that might build up from the blood residue without skinning the fish before cooking it. It was cooked head, spines and fins off and was bled and processed at sea and kept as cold as possible to assure edibility without ammonia build up. Same process that is necessary for Mackerel and some tuna.

I hope that sooner than later we will learn from the fiasco that happened to Orange Ruffy! The same thing could very well happen to Pacific Spiny Dog Fish, the stock might just instantly collapse.:2cents:
 

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cold as possible to assure edibility without ammonia build up
Sharks can often be high on the ammonia because they pee through their skin (apparently)???
Marinating in milk (the lactic acid in milk helps to neutralize the ammonia) can help.

The use of vinegar, lemon, lime, acidic marinates has long been used to counter the ammonia or extend the shelf life of seafood.
The acids helping neutralize the ammonia and extending the shelf life of perishable food was the initial goal long ago the taste was the bonus.
Much like smoking or pickling......:cheers:
 

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Caught a large skate once on a guided trip out of Port Hardy. Same thing for them(high ammonia). Apparently, they taste like scallops if prepared properly. Unfortunately, I didn't know it at the time and our boat Skipper told us they are inedible and let it go. Would've liked to try it. Also, on a trip out of Port McNeill, we each landed a sizeable dogfish. Both were over 3 feet. Not much of a fight but still cool to look at.
 

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We used to get dogfish in the chippie back in England. They called it Rock Salmon. Also Skate is delicious. Cut the wings off. Has no bones only cartilage.
 

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Sharks can often be high on the ammonia because they pee through their skin (apparently)???
Marinating in milk (the lactic acid in milk helps to neutralize the ammonia) can help.
Thank you, what I was alluding to is the fact that when you fight a fish the blood and therefore uric laden flesh from activities associated with stress and hard work before death are difficult to remove. Unless you skin the fish and let the flesh weep out some blood and plasma. So if I personally was to fish deliberately for Dog Fish as a food fish it would not at all be "sport fishing".

Seeing that old school trolling with anchovies and herring for monster Chinooks down deep is an almost certain way to catch them on a turn. As my poor dad learned! His favourite retort to my interest in eating some of the ones he frequently hooked was "if that thing comes in the boat I am getting out!" and he would urge me to kill it so that we would save the hooks rather than just cutting the line.

Which I refused to do, which unfortunately made him go bananas. <snif>

One day I will eat Dog Fish but I will do it with the respect they and all fish deserve. Heaven knows I have eaten and even smoked enough Mackerel when fishing the salt chuck out here on the West Coast.

Regards
Eric
 
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