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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, Kingfisher had asked me about "short floating" in another thread, and I realized that there might just be a need to expand on some of the techniques used to fish our rivers for salmon....

kingfisher2006 said:
Hi Ribwart, I really enjoyed reading your posting (October 9) and the information you supplied on teaching your girlfriend to fish. I wish more people would write arcticles of their day fishing as you have done. I do have one question though, what is short floating? Is that the length/timing of floating your gear down the river or length of float placement from pencil weight? Any clarity to this that you can add would be greatly appreciated; as you can tell I am new to river fishing. So far I have been to the river twice in past week with no luck either time. I was fishing near train bridge east of Keith Wilson bridge. Thanks
Firstly, this has been touched on in this forum before, but it seems prudent to reiterate and expand on this technique here. Short floating refers to the length from your float to your weight, specifically setting that distance at a length that is less than the depth of water you are fishing.

What is the point of bringing this method to our attention? Recently some of you may have noticed that there has been an increased number of clean, chrome fish lying dead on the bottom of some of the pools you fish, and you may have wondered why? ...or you may have noticed that a great many people fishing around you have been hooking a lot of fish, but unfortunately many of them have been foul hooked, as in hooked in the tail, or by a fin...you may also have noticed that many fisherman seem to be hanging up on the bottom, and you have to wait for them to try and dislodge their gear all the while spooking fish that were holding in the pool...you may have also noticed that the coho seem to be quite tight lipped under these conditions....there is one very simple reason why these and other things are occuring more frequently on our rivers. However, let's go off on a brief tangent for a second...

Many of you have gone and fished the Fraser river for sockeye during the summer, some of you have never fished for salmon in rivers before and your first exposure to the sport may have been out on the fraser on a warm summer day. If you have, then you might know that sockeye don't bite. This is why the technique used on the fraser is to have a leader length of more than 6 feet, no float, and to be continuously bouncing the bottom of the river in a manner that is not unlike "dredging"... The reason this works, is because sockeye swim with their mouths open, and in dragging your long leader line along the bottom, inevitably your line will end up "flossing" the sockeye mouth until the hook lodges in the corner of it and you set the hook....The fish did not bite your presentation, it was deliberately and some might argue skillfully hooked against its will in a technique that equates to legal (for now) snagging. This method is not sporting and is employed so as to catch fish and take them home for the table.

Unfortunately this method is often the first exposure new fishers have to our sport, and when they explore other fisheries like the vedder river right now, they use methods such as these...with a bit of a twist...this method of flossing has evolved somewhat. Coho, springs, pinks, and chum salmon will bite a well presented peice of wool, bait, spinner etc, etc unlike sockeye on the fraser which almost all of the time will not.
Most fishermen on flows like the vedder use floats to present their gear, and when novices see this, what occurs is a type of hybrid method between long lining of the sockeye fishery and the float fishing method used for other species that will take a presentation. It's important to understand that salmon will tend to swim within a foot or two of the bottom of a river because the current is slower in this lower portion and they expend less energy in their migration upstream. So when one is bottom bouncing with a float or without a float, their line is being dragged though the fish, it drags along their bodies and fins, the weight hits them in the side and they swat it with their tails, or peel off quickly in an instinctually defensive move...this is why many of the fish hooked when one fishes with a length of float to weight that is greater than the depth of the river they are floating in they either snag on the bottom with their weight, or they snag a fish by the tail or by the ***...well, you get the idea...keep in mind of course that longer leaders also make it easier for the leader line to get tangled up in the mass a fish bodies swimming around down there and people hook fish without the fish actually seeing the presentation, liking it and biting it of their own volition...


So there are many reasons why you might short float instead of dredge/floss/sweep...these are just some of the reasons short floating is a more ethical and appropriate way to fish rivers than floss

-you don't snag bottom and so don't tie up the pool trying to get your line free or spook fish for the remainder of the day by yanking on the line like some spaz... ::)

-you don't spook the fish by hitting them in the side with your weight

-you don't snag a fish in the tail, ***, fin, belly or anywhere else by setting the hook when you feel the weight hit that fish accidentally...wasting your time and other fishers time trying to land a fish that isn't under control! You cannot "play" a fish that is foul hooked, you have no control over it and will also likely kill it, lose your gear, and/or snap your rod in two horsing it in....

-you don't put a hole in the fishes belly with that hook when you snag it, consequently killing the fish within hours or days depending on the severity of the wound and therefore killing it before it spawns which has an impact on fish stocks...(their body cavity fills up with water, and they either "drown" cause they can't swim properly, or they die of some infection).

-you only hook fish that want to come up just a bit to your hook, because you are drifting over their heads... this allows you to hook a fish with a definite visual float strike which is more exciting than trying to tell the difference between a rock and a fish.

-over the course of the entire days fishing, the fish will be more willing to bite as they have been less spooked from the start...meaning if you aren't bumping them, or snagging the bottom right next to them or snagging the tail of the chum right next to the nice bright coho you'd rather have, then that nice bright coho is less likely to get tight lipped and refuse all presentations...or hide in some obscure piece of slack water you'd never think to check.

So how does short floating work? The golden rule is the length from your float to your weight, (not to your hook, but from float to weight), should be less than the depth of the water you are fishing by at least a foot...in fact usually a shorter float than that is better as you want your hook floating above the fish's heads...not disturbing them or spooking them at all...enticing them to strike, not striking them.

You may have noticed how salmon swim near the bottom, and when you walk up to a pool they see you and swim a bit further away....well this would logically mean that the salmon can see things above them and around them and react to them right? So the theory behind the short floating technique is to present your attractant, be it bait or a spinner, or a peice of wool that looks like some salmon eggs floating in the water, in such a way that the fish sees it, reacts to it swims over, and bites it. Fish don't have hands to inspect items that they are curious about, they use their mouths to check things out. Therefore by presenting your wares to the fish in such a way that entices them to inspect what you are offering, you are trully participating in and honing the skills of river drift fishing...you have tricked the salmon or steelhead into striking your presentation because it wanted to, not because you hit it on the head with your weight and it accidentally swam into your hook...when you fish with a "short float" and the fish strikes your hook, you will have trully experienced the "sport" in sportfishing and will learn that there is a science and methodology to catching these beautiful fish on our rivers that requires much more skill than just dragging your hook along the bottom and hoping for the best.
You bring in factors like what depth the fish are precisely at, how much weight to use to present your offering at the right speed, and what angle you need to approach the fish from so as to slow or speed up your presentation in such a way as to entice them to bite. Suddenly what color jig or wool or spinner you use becomes a part of the challenge.

I would also mention that down at the KW bridge pool you mentioned kingfisher, the majority of fishermen are flossing/dredging, you can tell because their floats are bobbing up and down non stop as their weight taps bottom every centimeter of the drift, you might also notice some people using a float, but that it seems redundant because that float is almost on its side because it is fished too deep. I am sure most of these fishers do not know better and are only a product of the overwhelming desire to hook fish. They likely don't know that 9 out of 10 fish they hook don't have to be hooked by the tail, but I would like to think that if they were shown alternative methods to catch these great fish they might realize there is a better, more responsible and ethical way to catch salmon in our rivers.

One other item of note is no technique is perfect...you will occasionally snag a fish by accident short floating, but this will happen 1 in 20 times as opposed to 9 out of 10 times with dredging with a long leader...and you will almost never snag bottom and lose another leader or weight again...also, short floating in a pool surrounded by flossers will be tough, all the fish in there will have already been spooked, and you will be waiting alot for fishermen and women to dislodge themselves from the bottom of the river or snap off a foul hooked fish....in short floating you will get a great many more drifts in than someone who is dredging, this is because you aren't wasting time with the "snags"... be they "bottom of river or bottom of fish..." ;)
I hope this helps, and that any of you who didn't know any other way to fish might now make an attempt to angle in a more responsible manner...there are so many, many reasons why you should.

(PS: "Pass it on" ;) )
thanks for listening,
rib

Here's also some more discussion and points re short floating:

http://www.bcfishingreports.com/forums/threads/8324-Short-Floating-Winter-Steelhead
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

You pretty much summed it up except for the use of fleurocarbon leaders. With the river at an all time low, you will spook a lot less fish if you manage to find a decent run early in the am, by the use of these leaders rather than the mono stuff...Way less drag in the water and although not completely invisible, you will get a lot more strikes with the method outlined by ribby.......IMHO if you are on the river 2 hrs. after daybreak, you should pack up. Those poor fish are getting thrashed, and your chances of a legit hook up are very very slim.
..Ortho......... 8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Good point ortho...anyone who has questions or wants to explore some of the more finesse type aspects to these techniques, like flourocarbon leader line and when to use it and when not to bother, please post questions here...it's a great venue to gather knowledge that will greatly improve success on the river!

The real point of this thread is to get the information out there for those who are new to the sport...I don't think there is enough done to show people some of the more ethical ways to fish our rivers, and some of the techniques being employed these days that have spilled over from specialty fisheries like the sockeye fishery on the fraser are not sportsmanlike methods or responsible for that matter...

Flourocarbon leaders and other gear and subtle technique variations can be employed at different times to help catch fish more effectively...there are many, many experienced fishermen here who I'm sure would be willing to share their knowledge and that any one of us can sound off on in order to improve our skills and make our days more enjoyable out there...

thx ortho,
rib
 

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Short Floating

Enjoyed the post rib, I had my first experience with drift fishing for Salmon on the Vedder last weekend and as a newbie to the technique I admit I was a bit dismayed to watch a few other fisherman going for this snag style technique. I hope to employ some of your suggestions as I carry on. Cheers.
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Hi Rib, wow, that was an awesome explaination and totally makes sense. I have found it hard to get good information on fishing techniques as most don't want to share their "secrets". I have asked others fishermen and even staff at tackle shops and have never had it explained as well as you have done. I will definetly put these suggestions to good use. I wouldn't mind hearing more about picking a good fishing location, eg. depth of water, width of river of fishing area, shade vs. no shade, speed of river flow, bend in river, how long to stay in one spot before moving about to try a new location, etc. I know that there are alot of variables here and that experience will help me make these decisions yet I know that any suggestions you can provide will definately help. I do hope that others will follow your suggestions which will help to sustain a healthy fish population for future and create better fishing opportunities. Once again thanks for your suggestions and I hope to get more from ya in the future.


Kingfisher
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

excellent post Rib

that is exactly how i have been fishing for the last couple years as i have learned to keep my presentation visible to the fish rather than under them

however like you stated that you do "foul" hook some even this way :( especially when you have ALOT of other people around snagging and sppoking these fish

fish will bite aggressively when they are calm and even after another fish has stirred the pool but not usually when someones weight and things are smacking them around LOL :D

tight lines

HOOK

P.S. Hey Rib, when are we gonna hit the one of these flows this fall ? im free weekends how bout you ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

I'll be free weekends it looks like starting the last week of october so hopefully we can "hook" up out there sometime after these rains come....pun intended :lol:
Hey Hook, How's that new centerpin workin out? If you want to tackle some of kingfishers subsequent questions jump on in there, and anyone else for that matter... he added another post there with some really good questions that will need to be answered to make the whole short floating thing a little more productive... particularly the bends in rivers, and speed of river flow aspects he mentioned.... I'm studying hard for an exam, and I work to support myself and a home...I can't be typing here until I'm blue in the fingers.... :lol: :lol: :lol:

Kingfisher...one key thing to cue in on are "trenches" in the faster runs, often there will be a long stretch of bottom under a faster run that is much deeper than the rest of the run, and not very wide, ie maybe a foot or two wide at most...these are hard to find, but well worth it. They will usually be a foot or two deeper, and the fish will line up in here. The fast water drops into this trench and slows down, so there will be a stratification of current speed...really fast on top, a much, much slower in the trench...there will also be the transition zone of water flow between the two speeds...the trick is to fish your presentation so that you are just at the bottom of that transition zone and at the top of that slow water layer in the trench...if you can keep you weight just at the right depth, then you can slow you presentation down in really fast water and still be drifting above the fish...you'll know when you are doing it right when your float is moving way slower than the fast water you are fishing in and of course you aren't tapping bottom - it'll seem like your float is moving slow motion...

Of course the amount of weight here is critical...it will take a second or two for your gear to get through the fast water zone and down to where you want to be, but if you aren't using enough weight then the force of the current above on your mainline will drag your leader and weight out of the zone you want to be in...this is where people get into trouble.

They think they need to fish deeper because their float is moving too fast, so they lengthen the float out, and start bouncing bottom. Of course this succeeds in slowing down the presentation, but it also succeeds in flossing/snagging fish, what you need to do is put a bit more weight on, so that you can offset the force of the current on your line more easily and keep your presentation in the zone, thus slowing it down...also, one more thing, a shorter leader in this particular instance is a good call...otherwise your weight might be in the right spot, but with too long a leader, the faster current above can "hold on" to your leader line preventing it from falling into the zone with the weight...
hope that makes sense...

thx for all the responses guys,
I think it's important we start getting the right information out there, I see more and more these days techniques that used to be pretty rare, but were always frowned upon...maybe with everyones cooperation we can see a resurgence in ethical methods and more responsible angling? If it means better fishing when I retire, I'm willing to put in the effort now...
thx again,
rib
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

I was at the river this afternoon with my girlfriend and I pointed out the differences between the way WE were fishing and the snaggin' and flossin' that was going on around us. Your post has left no questions and we both agree that every fisherperson should read your very relevant post. Our solution was to walk way down away from everyone and have a wonderful sunfilled afternoon on the river..................we only had 1 bite and didnt land it..lol.
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Excellent post rib, you should send that one to BC Outdoors!
 

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short floating

I want to say thanks for that post rib.I have wanted to learn this stuff for some time now.I do have a question,you mentioned short floating spinners. I would like to use your methods with a spinng rod and reel. Can it be done?Can I use it for spoons as well?If anyone can tell me how I would really appr. it.thanks again anyway
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Someone else will have to tackle the spoons aspect of fishing in rivers, especially with a spinning rod....

I can take on the topic of fishing a spinner under a float though...but it will have to wait a bit for now.

I'll post something soon....ok....here we go.

Truthfully trout80, it's tough to short float anything with a spinning reel, bait or spinner or otherwise....but it can be done...it's just difficult.

The problem is, when fishing the float, you want to be free spooling line off the reel so that you get a tension free drift...I hope you know what I mean by that? You want your rig floating downstream without you pulling back on the line, and unless you are free spooling line off the reel to allow the float to "drift" freely with the current, then your presentation is lifting up out of the zone you want it to be in, and it no longer looks natural...

You can get around this by shortening your drifts...

By shortening your drifts, you want to end your floats drift before you start to put tension on the line because you can't free spool. So, there is an easy way to do this. Shorten your drifts... Meaning shorten the distance you let your float go downstream... Well your thinking that won't be too far, with my reel, before tension starts being applied to the float....

so here's the solution I would use... this is a bit hard to describe in words but here we go....

You need to approach your pools differently...imagine a 40 foot stretch of water in front of you, this is the pool you want to fish. You have some current, you can see it by the riffles in the water...in order to fish this most effectively with your set up you would have to stand in the middle of the 40 foot stretch...with 20 feet to the right of you and 20 to your left...You are the pivot point that your drift revolves around so to speak...you cast to the beginning of the run, and while your float moves downstream with the current, you need to lift your rod slowly at a nice even pace taking slack line up off the water...then as the float passes you you need to conversely lower the rod at a nice even pace and let slack go with the float as it drifts the last 20 feet...

I kid you not, this is very tough fishing with the spinning reel setup, you can't fish as long a drift, (meaning distance through the pool), and as your targeted water gets further and further away from you, it will be harder and harder to take up the slack line just by lifting your rod up...you will need to fish pools that are not so wide, just fish the narrow ones and this will work better....

Your life would be much easier with a baitcaster or centerpin reel, but it can be done with your spinning reel... it's just much more demanding and requires a higher degree of timing and concentration....your weakness with the spinning reel is in controlling the drift more than anything else...


trout80...the beauty of this all is if you were trying to do this by bottom bouncing,

ie: the method we're trying to discourage here....

you would not be able to get any kind of a good drift period....

but because you are short floating you can still get some decent drifts going even with the spinning rod AND you have just as good chance of getting a fish to strike!!! :D

Now, as far as fishing the spinner goes there is something you need to consider...

A spinner is much heavier than most presentations , even roe...so in this case the short float means from the float to your hook....not float to weight. So will want your spinner to be drifting 1 to 3 feet up off the bottom....set your float accordingly....

also keep this important bit in mind....

A spinner, I find, works most effectively for coho and steelhead when it is not constantly spinning, but slowly flashing back and forth in the water...you'll know it is working correctly if you can see it flashing down there in the water in front of you on some of your drifts in shallower water...particularly when the sun is on the pool...
the real key will be setting your depth not too deep so that your spinner is just at the top of the slow water zone mentioned earlier....use less weight...the spinner and your weight add up to more than you think...and watch for that slow flashing of the spinner blade in the water....

Here is a pic of a typical spinner I use...but most types work well this way...



I typically will fish this 2-3 feet off the bottom but somtimes much more than that!!!! So, say a pool is about 5 feet deep, the length from my float to the hook on the end of my spinner would be about 3 ft. maybe 3 1/2 ft tops....

There are other ways to fish a spinner too, but I employ this method as I have found it the most successful under most conditions...maybe others here can add to this...
If you have any questions....post em here.


oh, and...Anyone here have experience fishing spoons?

You could probably fish spoons pretty well with the spinning reel...but that's more a question for google or your local library...there's a book called: "spoon fishing for steelhead"...find it read it, it applies to salmon as well. Spoon fishing won't have anything to do with short floating really...

thx,
rib
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Nice post Sandy....one thing Sanderson mentioned trout80 was....


Sanderson said:
If I'm using a spinning reel I prefer to back reel line out rather than open the bail.
...this backing line off the reel can be applied to your drifts when short floating also...it can increase the distance of your drift through the pool, however when backing line off the reel in reverse mode, be careful and pay particuler attention, as when you need to set the hook on a strike, you'd better make sure the reverse mode is turned off!!!! Otherwise, you can run into a whole bunch of problems...and lose fish.

good luck,
rib
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Excellent posts once again Ribwart and Sanderson. Ribwart, I used your suggestions today and caught 2 chum (catch and release - poor color) and lost 2 chum. Your techniques totally worked. A guy beside me caught one 30lb and one 10lb chrome spring and had many others on line (chum and springs - which he released due to poor color. I found a deep trench ( 8-10 feet deep - 75 yards long) in the river with shallow fast flow upriver (50 feet away) moving down river in a slower flow, exspecially in trench area. The river section was only about 12 feet across and the trench only about 3 feet in width. You could see the faster moving water on top and slower water below. I read what you wrote and as soon as I saw this spot I knew I was on to something. You could see 10 or so 10-30 lb salmon in this trench. I tossed my line by pulling excess line (between float and rod tip- about 5 feet of line) up to rod tip by hand and flinging the line upriver and infront of salmon waiting in trench. The drift was only about 10 feet, then I would pull excess line between float and rod tip by hand (like a fly fisherman) and retoss it again. If you got the right drift and depth you would get a strike pretty quickly. Peach colored wool on hook is what they wanted today (tried pink but no strikes). Can't thank you enough for your tips. Do you or anyone else know of a good/reasonalbly priced place that can redo all eyelits for my baitcast rod? Take care and thanks again.

Kingfisher
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Now kingfisher...your weight wasn't tap, tap, tap, tapping along the bottom though right?...just making sure...but it sounds like you're getting the hand of it....nicely done my man, nicley done indeed!


For further clarification of the whole short floating issue....

Some things I have been meaning to add...

If you are setting the hook every cast or every couple of casts, then this is too good to be true!!!!!!!!!!
If this is the case you need to take a good look at your depth/length of float to weight and re evaluate your technique....

also,

More fish snagged rather than hooked in the mouth is a good indication you are "cheating" the sport....and should shorten your depth...

and lastly...

More often than not, when a fish has purposefully taken your presentation, the hook will be inside their mouth!!!!

Either in the roof of, or in the base of the fishes mouth...

Sometimes when flossing you can hook them in the mouth, but the hook will be lodged in the corner of their mouths, right in the maxilliary, and usually hooked into the outside of the fishes mouth...

Take a close look when you are fishing to see exactly what your hookup pattern seems to be, it will give you a good idea how well you are presenting your gear....

FOR EXAMPLE: often when you are drifting really well, and are on the ball, your hook will be right in the roof of the fishes mouth, or under the tip of it's nose...because you detected the bite right away...

conversely, if your hook tends to be deeper in the fishes mouth, then you might be a little slow on you hook sets, and the fish might be chewing on your stuff too long before you detect the bite...

and of course if the hook is right in the maxilliary, then it is more likely you came at it sideways and flossed the fish...although sometimes that happens by chance too...

Having said that, these are not hard rules to live by, and as I just mentioned, various types of hookups happen just by chance. But keep in mind, keeping an eye on little things like this can give you another indicator of how your presentation is getting to the fish, and how sharp you are at detecting the bite...

Next time you're out there fishing, look at the positions of the hook over the course of your day and just keep it in mind...
you just might gain some perspective on your techniques that will help you get better....

Great to hear your day went well Kingfisher!!! Where were you fishing? Did you see any coho hooked? Were there a lot of guys out today?
Thx for the report, post the long version up in the fishing reports section will ya?
rib
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

I can't thank you enough ribwart I understand clearly what your saying.Thanks to you as well sanderson.I understand what your saying as well. This info. is great. you've been a big help. I will try to get out next weekend and put it all together.
 
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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Sandy and Ribby :lol: can you guys make it any easier for newbies to short float or spin cast the vedder or chehalis etc. There's more information here than in a 8 hour fully instructional guided trip :D

Way To Go Guys

Mike <"))))))><
 

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Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

Hey Rib and Sandy, you guys should write a book, your explainations are so clear and easy to understand, even for a newbie. Rib, I did manage to avoid hitting bottom with the weight. It sure did help that I could see into the water yet I could feel the difference as well. It was so cool watching the hook float toward the fish and them striking it. I just have to get better at timing setting the hook though, as I lost 2 quickly when attempting to set too early. The guy beside me did land most of his fish (only kept the 2; giving one to my Dad) by hooking in the mouth and he did not snag any that I am aware of. This guy did loose a couple to broken leaders as well. I do not know hook placement of his catches as I would not have thought to ask. He was watching the 30 lb spring in the water just before he caught it, and it only took him about 3 minutes from the time he spotted it to when it struck his hook. I have never seen anyone as productive as this guy and we were both fishing the same area. My Dad (who I forgot to mention yesterday) did not catch anything :0( . We were fishing the same spot I mentioned the other day - about 2 km east of KW bridge off KW road and head south to river. There is a parking area and gravel road that parallel's river that will take you to a train bridge. There was only my Dad, myself and this other guy within 1/2 km of us on either side for over 2 1/2 hrs (got there at 6:45 am ). We left at 12:00 and still only about 6 other guys in general area at that time. About 1/2 km up river, east of parking area (no road to drive down, up river), there were about 20-30 fishermen, when we left for the day (very crowed into one area of river) . There are some deep pools off to side of river flow (probably 15 + feet deep at middle and 100 feet across) along this river area with some large Chum swimming around but no sign of Coho. As the rains come, these pools may gain Coho as they come up river. The other fisherman I spoke of early, worked this pool of water for about 45 minutes with spinners and wool first thing in morning with not one bite. He then started fishing where I had been for 30 minutes and landed the 10lb spring after second cast (I couldn't believe it). I tried that pool I mentioned, the other day with no luck either. I hope this answers your questions.


Kingfisher
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Short floating versus bottom bouncing, and other stuff...

kingfisher2006 said:
About 1/2 km up river, east of parking area (no road to drive down, up river), there were about 20-30 fishermen, when we left for the day (very crowed into one area of river) .
This sounds like the pool with the tree stump that is just below lickman road...this pool is a gong show Kingfisher....many if not almost all of the people fishing this pool will be using questionable methods...you'll see their floats jumping up and down as their weight drags through the gravel....you likely also see leaders that are way too long, (ie: 3 ft plus...you don't need more than 2 1/2 feet at the most)... :? :cry: :( :evil:

The fish in this pool in peak season are so traumatized they hug the roots of the stump like life preservers....

If you want to see how NOT to do it, go check out this pool for a few minutes I guarantee that someone will be dredging bottom with a long leader, and setting the hook every cast....

too bad, it is a great pool for fish to hold up in, year after year they hold up in there...but once they get spooked and the few fresh fish that are in there have been flossed, the rest of the fish stick tight to the tree and nobody gets anything else for the day...mostly.

Great to hear things are going well Kingfisher, keep it up, and keep posting...
:D
rib
 
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