BC Fishing Reports banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
3,796 Posts
Slime lines come in sink tip and full sink lines, and I think Cortland makes a clear floating saltwater line. Maybe someone else knows the details. I don't know how effective a clear floating line would be. If you have ever seen the distortion even a leader makes on the surface film, you will realize that a floating line, no matter what its colour or lack of colour, is quite visible to any fish looking up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
"Slimeline" was the nickname that was given to the first generation of clear sinking lines that came out. They had a sink rate of around 2" per second, had a monofilament core, and the clear coating felt slimy when wet...therefore the nickname. These lines had the problem of lots of line memory due to the mono core, which meant lots and lots of tight little coils and having to stretch them out like crazy prior to every use to get rid of most of them.

The newest generation of clear sinking lines are great. They have low memory, some specifically designed for use in our colder water climate. They come in different lengths and tapers to suit distance casting or regular fishing. Some, like the Cortland Clear Camo, sink closer to the true intermediate sink rate of 1" per second, while most are actually closer to the sink rate of a Type II line.

There are a few clear floating lines out there, I think one of them put out by the smaller company Monic. It's been a while since I've shopped for gear, so I'm not 100% sure. I've only heard of one guy using a clear floater, and that was for really spooky fish in small spring creeks in the US. For our type of fishing up here, I don't think it's necessary...but we all go with what we're comfortable with. I wouldn't like it because I wouldn't be able to see what my line or line tip are doing...sometimes strikes are so light all you see is the tip slightly moving.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
To help cure that "memory" issue when you first buy it, drop your spool into some warm water with a touch of dish soap. That'll take off some of the factory goo and help it sink properly when you go out and use it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
japander said:
To help cure that "memory" issue when you first buy it, drop your spool into some warm water with a touch of dish soap. That'll take off some of the factory goo and help it sink properly when you go out and use it.
This is a good tip, and especially useful for the slower sinking clear lines like the Cortland Clear Camo.

And I'm sure no one ever does this, but I just thought I'd mention it...never ever wipe on that line dressing that you use for floating lines. It's a floatant and will prevent or hinder your slow sinking line from breaking the surface tension. I never use the stuff at all, even for my floating lines as modern floating lines have built-in lubricants that migrate to the sirface of the line as necessary, and the liquid stuff just attracts grime anyway.

Cheers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
When the clear lines were first developed the memory issue was terrible on cold days. I recently switched to one of the Scientific Angler clear lines for striped bass fishing and haven't had the memory problem when fishing clear water for coho. The other brands have probably figured out how to reduce the memory too. The other tips on this thread are great.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top