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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is the latest update regarding what will be next for the sockeye in the Allouette. Sounds like hydrowants to do the right thing but seems to be very cautious regarding building a fish ladder.

B.C. Hydro will lead the way for sockeye plan
By Phil Melnychuk - Maple Ridge News - November 14, 2007 | | |

The heavy load that the friends of fish at Alouette River Management Society have been hoisting will lighten a little bit.

B.C. Hydro has agreed to take on the job of coordinating federal, volunteer and B.C. agencies in the continuing saga of restoring sockeye to the Alouette River.

"We're pleased with the results going forward. We're equally really pleased to have the salmon returned. So we've agreed, B.C. Hydro will take the lead with the agenda," Charlotte Bemister, Hydro's community relations spokesman, said Friday.

MP Randy Kamp (Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge-Mission) set up the meeting last week so that a way could be found to start rebuilding the sockeye population, now that it's been proven the salmon in the Alouette reservoir are descendants of sockeye trapped in the lake for 80 years.

DNA tests on sockeye that returned from the ocean last summer showed they came from the lake two years previous during an unscheduled escape down the spillway.

Initially, rebuilding sockeye would involve trapping the sockeye at the base of the dam, and trucking them around it and dumping them back into the lake, where they could complete their spawning cycle.

A fishway around the dam, however, could lead sockeye directly into the lake. Unlike other salmon species, young sockeye need a year in a lake before starting their migration to the Pacific Ocean.

Bemister said Hydro has been part of the gradual scientific process of restoring sockeye to the system, citing the Hydro-funded fertilization program in the lake. That program has allowed the sockeye population to jump – creating a good base for eventual migration.

"We've been part of this from Day 1."

She said ARMS has been the lead agency but Hydro has been involved all along, adding that Hydro wants to be cautious and is not immediately committing to building a fishway.

Geoff Clayton of ARMS said the meeting wouldn't have happened without Kamp, who's parliamentary secretary to the fisheries minister.

But he also wants Kamp to encourage the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to be involved at every step.

Clayton said ARMS has applied to Hydro's coastal fish habitat restoration program for funding the next step to support a trap and truck program for the sockeye.

Total cost for that would be about $30,000 – needed for new tubs for the sockeye and a trailer to carry the fish.

Meanwhile, ARMS is already working on the step to restoring the run, doing a feasibility study for a fishway. That will be done by the Ministry of Environment, said Clayton.

The Habitat Conservation Trust Fund has given tentative approval for a $30,000 grant to fund that.
 

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Not to change the subject but didn't the coquitlam river have one of the biggest returns of sockeye in the lowermainland/ I'm sure the word coquitlam is a native word for something to do with sockeye? You would think i would know being that i'm half native! lol

CK
 

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Fact about the sockeye run or coquitlam meaning? What I said about the sockeye is just what I've heard from old timers about the good old days. The coquitlam meaning is what I've read on differant websites. ;)

Alrite lets not hijack this thread :)
 

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Good to hear them coming back! I grew up in the ridge and always remember times that I wold drive down the bottom of 224th after heavy rains and see alot of salmon in the side channels and even on the road.I never fished then but the memory is imprinted forever.



On a side note,I was taugh that kwaykwtlem was "the place os smelly fish" Which means they would get so many fish for a small system that in the fall the smell was overbearing and could be detected for miles around. :2cents:



Hotrod
 

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Good news, flyguy! Thanks.

In regards to their idea of trucking up the sockeye, how would this idea work? In my opinion it would just make sense that these fish would be so spooked out by this oredeal and it may effect their spawning. Will that happen?

Does anybody know how high the damn is and how much of a difficulty it would be to build a ladder as opposed to driving the fish into the park and dumping them back into the lake. How would the 1 year old salmon get from the lake back into the river?
 

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coho_killer said:
Not to change the subject but didn't the coquitlam river have one of the biggest returns of sockeye in the lowermainland/ I'm sure the word coquitlam is a native word for something to do with sockeye? You would think i would know being that i'm half native! lol
Historically, the Coquitlam also had the run of the largest Steelhead with the greatest numbers this side of the Thompson. They were comparable to the last of the large Squamish steelhead.

That all changed when Cewe and Ballard were allowed to destroy the river for gravel.
 

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finaddict said:
coho_killer said:
Not to change the subject but didn't the coquitlam river have one of the biggest returns of sockeye in the lowermainland/ I'm sure the word coquitlam is a native word for something to do with sockeye? You would think i would know being that i'm half native! lol
Historically, the Coquitlam also had the run of the largest Steelhead with the greatest numbers this side of the Thompson. They were comparable to the last of the large Squamish steelhead.

That all changed when Cewe and Ballard were allowed to destroy the river for gravel.
The gravel mining company on the Coquitlam is Allard not Ballard. The Hydro dam (built in1905 and raised in 1914) was the death knell for the andromous fish in the Coquitlam system, the gravel operations were allowed in after Hydro built the dam. There was a small steelhead run for years as part of the hatchery program on the river, but 4 or 5 years ago the DFO notified the local stream keepers that they did not have an appropriate license to rear steelhead and ordered them to stop.

However this is a thread about Allouette Socks, so let's not hijack it . Want to talk about Coquitlam salmon, let's start a new thread. :peace:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
reelangler said:
Good news, flyguy! Thanks.

In regards to their idea of trucking up the sockeye, how would this idea work? In my opinion it would just make sense that these fish would be so spooked out by this oredeal and it may effect their spawning. Will that happen?

Does anybody know how high the damn is and how much of a difficulty it would be to build a ladder as opposed to driving the fish into the park and dumping them back into the lake. How would the 1 year old salmon get from the lake back into the river?
Well trucking salmon works on coho so hopefully it will work for the sockeye as well.

As far as the dam goes it is actually pretty small. When we where teens we used to jump off of it. The only problem would be the out flow pipe at the other end of the lake that drains into the stave lake area. But I think they have solved that. I have also herd that if they are successful with re-establishing the sockeye run on the Allouette they will try the Coquitlam as well. I have also herd that they will get their brood stock from the Pitt river system.
 

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Yes, I agree that the dam is not far off the lake. But it's sure a long way down to the river. The ladder should have been installed when the dam was built. Hind sight is always 20\20. :2cents:
 
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