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Discussion Starter #1
Yes this site already does a great deal to educate anglers and to encourage catch and release fishing and as such I commend all who participate in it. However there is much more that can be done.

First off lets seriously consider the nursery of our fisheries and what key factors are really causing the historically recent catastrophic demise.

What are the first effective things that we could possibly do to mitigate this collapse?

The causes of stream habit loss to those who have been in the bush are obvious. Namely the denuding of and lack of water retention on critical spawning streams.

How can we deal with steam habitat loss caused by the overheating and lack of flow in glide and pool waters on our salmon streams? Is there a feasible and cost effective answer to this ecological disaster?

The short answer is perhaps. It is entirely possible to identify the critical heating areas on streams that have lost over-stream cover due to industrial activities and other reasons. Then use extensive and essentially inexpensive shading with existing farming technology to protect these areas from UV radiation and overheating. The shading technology used to protect ginseng plants from overheating could easily be adapted for this purpose. The technology that I refer to is wind resistant and can be temporarily erected on sections of streams to both provide over-stream cover and would also be reusable. It can be rolled up like a patio umbrella in winter rain and snow season or even removed in easy access areas.

Is this costly? yes, could it this be effective? Perhaps. The logistics are obvious but not unreasonable considering the alternative.

There are huge numbers of denuded streams, especially on hill sides because of our activities in areas that need to have overs-stream cover especially in years like this one that see drought conditions.

What else can be done to mitigate high water temps on streams during the summer Chinook, Sockeye and even on some summer run Steelhead streams that are still viable? Streams like the San Juan, the Gordon, the Klanawa, the Nitinat, the Nahmint, the Nipkish and a whole host of other similar streams all over the province that have had the forest denuded in their head waters.

Perhaps temporary removable, controllable small strategic dams with artificial over-stream cover can replace the work that beavers once did in holding back side channel streams and thus cooling the flow in some appropriate areas of streams that have been denuded.

In Washington State they are starting to finally see the folly of large dams, but just maybe small ones might do some good in very specific areas.

Fish ladders might also aid on some streams where a new run can be established or the removal of log jams that have occurred and blocked fish is called for in places that can support anadromous fish.

The effective stewardship of our shared environment must reach beyond the artificial boundaries of our political economy.

I truly hope that some here on this forum actually read this post and carefully consider advocating for these simple ideas as we need young and enthusiastic individuals to take up the cause and not fall prey to the political rot and negativity that seems to predominate our current environmental policies.

In short the ecological price we are paying for our activities is far too expensive, remediation is expensive, but the price of doing nothing is astronomical.

Eric
 

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Excellent topic. First thing that needs done, is we need to vote in a government that cares. Seeing our current provincial leadership is all about the selling off of resources it's going to be an all up hill battle. We need leadership which puts business after the environment. Maybe we will vote some in next time. Until then were going to see a proliferation of run of the river type dams, oil and gas pipelines and other similar type industries. Not to mention, probably more and tighter restrictions and bag limits for us. But, We voted them in so I guess we got what we deserve.
 
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Excellent topic. First thing that needs done, is we need to vote in a government that cares. Seeing our current provincial leadership is all about the selling off of resources it's going to be an all up hill battle. We need leadership which puts business after the environment. Maybe we will vote some in next time. Until then were going to see a proliferation of run of the river type dams, oil and gas pipelines and other similar type industries. Not to mention, probably more and tighter restrictions and bag limits for us. But, We voted them in so I guess we got what we deserve.
Or maybe at least leadership which balances the two a little more...it seems as though some middle ground could be found rather than always taking the money laden road. I've always felt that somehow it gets forgotten by those in power that there are still things which have value in addition to money and progress.

Reeman...why the artificial "ginsengesq" cover, etc...why not more permanent and long term help with stream rehab in the form of riprap, plants, woody debris etc, etc. instead?
 

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Excellent topic. First thing that needs done, is we need to vote in a government that cares. Seeing our current provincial leadership is all about the selling off of resources it's going to be an all up hill battle. We need leadership which puts business after the environment. Maybe we will vote some in next time. Until then were going to see a proliferation of run of the river type dams, oil and gas pipelines and other similar type industries. Not to mention, probably more and tighter restrictions and bag limits for us. But, We voted them in so I guess we got what we deserve.

Like you said we voted them in. I think even the liberals were astonished.
Never underestimate the voting power of the urbanites.
People who never experience our natural lands never learn to appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Reeman...why the artificial "ginsengesq" cover, etc...why not more permanent and long term help with stream rehab in the form of riprap, plants, woody debris etc, etc. instead?
Ribby, time is of the essence as most stream rehab with shade plants is slow and needs a boost to encourage growth. When the duff around the stream is overheated and the mosses and substructure of the forest floor dies it takes many years to effectively come back.

After picking chanterelle mushrooms over the years I have seen many regenerated side hill areas. It takes 40 to 50 years for the moss growth and duff to thicken on side hill feeder streams and at least 20 years before any effective shade returns.

In most places where feeder creeks are stepped down steep side hills there will be deep pools that can be enhanced to retain more runoff and then have that runoff released at strategic times. So perhaps artificial shading technology in combination with enhanced pool water retention in the right places might work.

I can detail many areas that I already know but going to some anymore is beyond my capabilities, because most are a billy goat show to say the least, however I will do some good photos of the areas soon to show exactly what I am talking about.

The experience of doing stream survey in the 1990's was an eyeopener and ever since then I have thought about what can be done.

On the lighter side perhaps we could genetically engineer some beavers to climb hills. Or see if they could become anadromous in the lower rivers side channels when the big flush happens like it did to the San Juan because of side hill denuding. Heck the flood of logs and stumps even took out the bridge to the west coast connector. I am sure it took a few beavers out to sea as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
This is a freshly logged area within the San Juan watershed that could possibly benefit from artificial temporary over stream cover. It is an upper water shed ephemeral stream that feeds into Harris Creek. The whole point is to slow down the dessication and death of the understory after being denuded of over-stream cover. This could help cool the pool water and help retain a margin of mosses and other absorbent plants in the duff instead of having it die off for 30-50 years before tall canopy over-stream cover regenerates.


As you can see these areas are typically in basins and the sides of them could be salvaged if protected from extreme UV light and overheating. Hopes this helps to clarify the idea.

EDIT: Just thought about a catchy acronym for the idea, it is a really CORNy idea though as are most of my serious thought so please do not think that this is a joke...at least in this instance.
The application could be known as Temporary Artificial Cover Over Stream to prevent over heating or the really silly acronym Hot Tacos
 
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