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So nobody gets offended, this post is just a friendly informational post for those fishers who may have troubles identifying the difference between "Pinks" and "Jack Springs".


The information is direct from the DFO site:


Pink Salmon (also known as humpy)



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How Can You Tell the Difference?

Anglers should use three or more distinguishing characteristics to properly identify all salmon. This would, for example, aid in identifying juvenile chinook from adult pink salmon. In the early adult stage, pink salmon are often mistaken for chinook because both have spots on their tails.
Description of pink salmon in marine phase

Pink salmon have tiny scales and a tail heavily marked with large oval spots. Unlike the other salmon species, the tail of a pink has no silver in it. In the sea, pinks have silver bodies with spotted backs. They are the smallest of the Pacific salmon, usually weighing about 2.2 kg, but occasionally reaching 5.5 kg. They are more abundant in northern waters in even-numbered years and in southern waters in odd-numbered years. Pinks live only two years.

Each pink salmon you keep must be at least 30 cm long.

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Chinook Salmon (also known as spring, tyee and king)



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How Can You Tell the Difference?

Anglers should use three or more distinguishing characteristics to properly identify all salmon. In the juvenile stage of chinook salmon, some fishers misidentify them as pinks because both have spots on their tails.

Description of chinook salmon in marine phase

Black gums and a silver, spotted tail distinguish the chinook from other salmonids. It has a lightly spotted blue-green back and is the largest, most prized game fish. The chinook lives from three to seven years. It weighs between 1.5 kg and 30 kg. Average-size chinooks are often known as springs in B.C. Those over 13.5 kg are called tyees, and in the U.S., chinook are called king salmon.


:cheers: :beerchug:
 
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