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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know how many steelhead are needed to fil the quota for the hatchery brood stock on the chilliwack river?? how many males to females?

CK
 

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I think you have to be able to hold your breath for a long time to be one of those brood stock guys. ;)
 

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i have only ever seen they put bucks in he brood stock bags. has anyone seen them bag does? and i wouldnt mind being a bag guy either, where do i sign up? im out there enough anyway this way i can give back.
 
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was on the cap last month went to the hatchery to use the john seen a worker there i asked about the brod stock he told me if i catch a wild and can hold it without hurting it i could call the hatchery and they would rush down to where i caught it and grab it there is a number by the crappers in the cap hatchery im sure if you call it they could give you the number for the chedder .
 
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reelangler said:
I don't understand the whole brood concept. How does it work, what is it for, what do they do with the stuff after? PM if this is off topic. Thanks, appreciate it.
Broodstock - simplified.

Wild fish are captured from the river and used to make hatchery fish.

The more indepth answer

Wild steelhead are angled from the river by certain guys who have permits to catch and retain live steelhead. The steelhead are placed into rubberized holding tubes with a soft mesh screen on each end of the tube and kept in the river. The hatchery is notified and a worker will show up with a live tank in a truck and pick up the fish from the river and transport it back to the hatchery. Sometimes the fish will be hiked out in a back pack or a water tight tube similar to the brood tube to transport fish that are more than a few seconds away from the truck. The fish are then held in tanks at the hatchery until ripe when they are live spawned. The kelts are then returned to the river to either a) immediatly return to the ocean (all the does do this and most of the bucks) or b) stick around for a while and try to find another mate (some bucks will do this) and then head back out for the sea. The eggs then go through the regular hatchery processes to smolt size. The entire purpose of this whole deal is to provide anglers with hatchery fish to angle for. All the smolts that came from the wild parents and were raised at the hatchery have a clipped adipose fin to allow for easy identification that those fish are hatchery raised... just for us to angle for.
 

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reelangler said:
But doesn't this eventually lower the amount of wild fish in the rivers? Why can't this be done with hatchery steel?
Because some of thehatchery fish manage to spawn (with wild fish) and this technique ensure the most genetic diversity remains in the overall stock.
 
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reelangler said:
Why can't this be done with hatchery steel?
When you spawn hatchery fish with hatchery fish through multiple generations you get a poor quality steelhead. Virtually all of the bad mouthing that has been seen in the past about American hatchery fish is the result of using hatchery fish to make hatchery fish over and over and over again and using only a couple of strains in all of the rivers. Using wild fish every year to make hatchery fish lessens the overall negative imprint that those offspring of wild parents would have on the native population of fish.

reelangler said:
But doesn't this eventually lower the amount of wild fish in the rivers?
Depends who you ask. I have never seen a study that states that using wild parents for broodstock and returning the smolts to their river of origin (eg wild vedder parents and returing the ensuing smolts into the Vedder and no other river) has had a negative impact on the wild population. What I have seen is are studies showing that using hatchery fish to make hatchery fish for several generations negatively impacts the wild population. What I have also seen is studies that show that fish (even wild brood fish) that are used as parent stock for a river sysytem other than their original one (eg wild Vedder fish used to supplement any other river) also will have a negative effective on the population of fish which is native to the river being stocked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This is what i found on anouther site! Thought i'd share!

fish are taken from daylight to about 3PM, weekdays only at this time. In the past about 70 wild steelhead are taken for spawning purposes that take place at the Chilliwack River Hatchery. The Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC and FOC staff at the Chilliwack Hatchery work together on this program.

A number of volunteer anglers will be carrying the holding tubes so please co operate if one of them asks to tube a wild fish you have on. It will be to your benefit to do so as you are providing hatchery fish for you and others in the years ahead. Of course the steelhead must be left in the water at all times if you see a volunteer coming to tube it from you.

CK
 
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