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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wondered if any of you could give me some pointers on Steelhead fishing. We are going to get tags again this year but I was hoping some of you could give me a few tips. Do they like fast water - deep pools? Do you use roe or wool? Thanks so very much in advance, for your tips!
 

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If I were you I'd book a date to take the steelhead course that Vic from STS does every year. Don't know the cost, but very informative. I took it 10 yrs ago when I first started steelheading. I had fished for a year with no luck. After the course I knew where I was going wrong. And fixed my problems and bang started catching fish with consistency. Check his website Guidebc.com ;D
 

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fishin30 said:
If I were you I'd book a date to take the steelhead course that Vic from STS does every year. Don't know the cost, but very informative. I took it 10 yrs ago when I first started steelheading. I had fished for a year with no luck. After the course I knew where I was going wrong. And fixed my problems and bang started catching fish with consistency. Check his website Guidebc.com ;D
Well give some pointers to help start her off then LOL.

Fish water thats moving at a walking pace. Fish roe, egg sacs, pink worms, ghost shrimp aka bugs, blades. The key is to find the fish, as steelhead are agressive. There is only a fraction of steelhead compared to salmon, so they have the "prime" spots to themselves basically. Try using the search feature there was a bunch of threads last steelie season with a load of useful info, and a lot of great pics.
 

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Here is some advice fish the veddar mid river hard. When I go out I park ,walk up river for about an hr looking for nice holding water , travelling slots and pockets behind boulders, under water debris. Then I will fish that entire section back to my truck and move on. I only focus on water that steelhead will hold or travel in. Water depths starting at 2 feet. When I get to a run I will examine it divide it into 3-4 sections. Make my first cast into the water where I can barely see bottom. Then I will make 3-4 casts into the same area and then cast further out by a few feet and correcting the depth of the float the whole time till I have fished that first section. Then move on and continue till the run has been fished. If you really feel there are fish present and they don't take the first time through then go through it with something different. You need to work the river to find the fish.Pick one lure or bait that you know will catch fish. Any of the above mentioned baits in Shanes post. And work it hard. Confidence and focus are the key to consistently catch steelhead.

Hope this helps ;)
 

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I took a steelhead course at Fred's custom tackle a few years back that really help put things in perspective where steelies are concerned. I would also reccommend that if they still offer such a cours.It was four hours in class and four hours on the river. It made a huge differance.I read alot of literature and fished with guys who had expeirience. Also I hired a guide on Vancouver island and it helped tons.

So the steelhead road can be along one but when you get there it's sweeet. Just keep putting in your time on and off the river and it will all come together.

Oh yeah! I got tons of info from the guys here in this forum and that played huge for me. So I would like to pay it forward as much as I can!


You must think like a steelhead!


Hotrod
 

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First pointer ........ don't wear anything quite as bright as shown in your avtar ....... they spook easily. Sorry, couldn't help it.

Seriously though ......... here is an article that I found really quite helpful and there are many others on the net.

Steelhead fishing in the Chilliwack/Vedder River should prove quite productive form February through March. Both hatchery and wild stocks have returned quite strong through January with December having one of the largest early runs in recent memory. The Steelhead run peaks in the Feb/Mar portion and will decline further in April with some late run fish still entering in May.

Water levels and clarity create constantly changing variables which will affect all anglers success on the river. Throughout this past month we have had very unsettled weather and the river conditions reflect that: one day the water is rising, the next dropping, the next almost at flood, then it freezes and in 2 days the river drops 4’ in height and clears, only to rain the next day and be rising again. Very frustrating at best. As the river changes, so does the behavior of the Steelhead. By noting these changes and altering fishing habits, the otherwise unsuccessful angler can score big in somewhat adverse conditions.

High water levels are often discouraging for fishing yet are the essential factor in enticing fish to enter into or move through the river system. Some will move slow and others will race upstream immediately. Fish on the move will travel close to shore, as little as 4 feet away and with the water depth often less than 3 feet. Reduced visibility is often found in high water and this will increase the security of fish holding in the shallow water.

With the security of murky water, it is not uncommon for fish traveling the shoreline to be drawn into fairly small side channels. As long as there is adequate water flow and security, side channels will provide safe and easy passage for any Steelhead coming up the river. Larger side channels can provide holding water for numbers of fish being somewhat pooped after a hard days swim.

With water levels high and steady or perhaps falling, most fish will continue to be on the move using the safest shoreline routes. Resting will usually be done in tailouts, riffles or in any convenient depression. The sweet spot of the larger pools usually proves unproductive until the water drops and clears, in the meantime concentrate angling efforts on water that the fish will travel through rather than the areas where they typically rest.

Good water levels provide the best opportunity for the Steelhead to advance their way upstream and they can and will rest in very unsuspecting places in high water conditions.



The most suitable method for fishing this type of water is referred to as short floating.
Adjust the distance between your float and bottom weight to allow it to reach within 10 - 20 inches of the bottom. Two or three split shot or about one and a half inches of pencil lead will provide sufficient weights for water depths up to about 4 feet. If the current is stronger or water depths greater, then more weight will be necessary to hold itself in the current without lifting up from the bottom. Keep your leader fairly short (12 - 20 inches).

The idea is to be clear from the bottom completely. This method will present your directly in the fishes field of vision.......mostly above and in front of it. In clear water, this will also be less intrusive, presenting your bait from above. In murky water it is not uncommon to fish too deep. If your bait is presented too close to the bottom then by the time it should come into the fishes view it has actually passed underneath the field of vision. Being well off the bottom, there will also be less float movement. So when your float dips of goes under DO NOT HESITATE - set the hook HARD. There is nothing lost by setting into a rock yet if it happens to be a fish you got it.

With water levels dropping, fish will continue to travel fairly close to shore and quite shallow. As the water clears, these fish will be quite easily spooked, yet quite easily caught if approached cautiously. Even in moderately high yet clear water it is common for fish to instinctively seek the safety of deeper trenches and pockets. When angling pressure is heavy, as is usually the case on the Chilliwack/Vedder River. The almost constant shoreline activity pushes the fish from the nice shoreline water and into more secure areas. In spite of adverse weather and water conditions, it is possible to find success by adapting to the changes.

GOFISH 8)
 

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On the vedder river i find there is alot of current seams, and there is quite a bit of pocket water, on the lower there are the nice long runs aswell. Float fishing will probably be what u will be doin. I use alot of natural bait because i find the scent adds to the presentation, but i also have a few artificial favourites. Steelhead bite alot more than salmon, in my mind i think they do feed. If u can present something infront of them they will take it, but the presentation is the key, on a river with lots of pressure it needs to be almost perfect but dont let that discourage you. A few baits to consider, roe, roe bags, normal worms(they are taken deep usually so i dont recomend them) normal tiger prawns. There are so many artificial baits my favourite 3 are the spin'n glow, Colorado blade spinner, and normal wool(yarn). Remember to cover lots of water, cus u show more fish your bait, and to switch up baits through every run, i will usually use 2 or 3 different baits through a run if possible. I like roe as a starter bait, then i'll switch to the prawns, and then finally to the blade as a clean up bait, if a fish is agressive they will usually take your bait. And if u come to a run with another bunch of guys, use what they aren't, if they're all using roe, or roe imitations a spinner or pink worm might do the trick, show the fish something different.

Good luck and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
GOFISH said:
First pointer ........ don't wear anything quite as bright as shown in your avtar ....... they spook easily. Sorry, couldn't help it.
GOFISH 8)
[/quote]

Naaaa - thats my lake fishing outfit - lol! But seriously - no - I know not to wear bright colors ;)
But thanks all you guys for taking the time to help me out! Would love to catch my first steelhead this year - got my first hatchery coho this year - so that was GREAT! Thanks again - I appreciate it :D
 

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Naaaa - thats my lake fishing outfit - lol!
Good comeback ...... and thanks for taking it the way it was meant ..... comical. I can actually think of a couple of others "lake fishing" remarks now ........ but I better leave them alone as I don't want to throw out a "lost leader". :happy: :happy:

GOFISH 8)
 
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