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Im definately a noob when it comes to nymphing. I got my first ever chironomid caught trout yesterday, and have only caught a couple others on pheasant tails ever. I mostly fish streamers and dries thusfar as a flyfisher.
I have a hard time with the idea of using an indicator or splitshots, id rather not use them if possible. How badly will this effect my success while nymphing? can i get away with not using them and do well or would i be wasting my time?
Also if there is anyone out there looking for someone to hike or flyfish with, i have lots of spare time and on my hands..
Thanks for reading.
 

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You can use a really small swivel when fishing chironomids or other patterns under an indicator, makes for easy leader length changes, gets the fly down.
 

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You can use a really small swivel when fishing chironomids or other patterns under an indicator, makes for easy leader length changes, gets the fly down.
That's exactly what I do, much easier.

JOHNEB you don't have to use an indicator but it can be the most effective way to fish a pheasant tail as you're always at a specific depth. I've had decent luck trolling with them but that's just to find the fish actively targeting the nymphs, then I'll switch over to casting or indicator. If it's calm you can just use a floater line and a leader length about 1ft less than the depth you're fishing and just let it sink with the occasional twitch....this works well if you're working 2 rods.
 

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can i get away with not using them and do well or would i be wasting my time?
As someone who is just getting into the chironomid/indicator method myself, no you wont be wasting your time as naked line chironomid'ing is the traditional method and has successfully been done for decades. Where the 'modernization' of added weights (ie tungsten-headed flies, swivels, shot, putty etc) and indicators have really increased the efficiency of fishing. Less time waiting for flies to sink to the desired depth and holding it there precisely with an indicator means more time productively fishing vs just soaking your line.

But I also think being able to do it without all that stuff is important too as designated fly-fishing only lakes do not allow external floats and weights so it would be a good skill to cultivate. But I also value my time on the water and if frequent fly changes searching for the right pattern shortens your leader by a few inches each time or moving from a 9' deep spot to a 18' spot and back again results in having to rebuild/re-tie my leader all the time, means I'll always be using an indicator and swivel where permitted.
 

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There are not many 'fly only' lake restrictions, at least not in my region. Trophy lakes are usually bait ban, retention limits and sometimes 'artificial' fly only, so indicators or floats, swivels and split shot are ok. Lots of rivers are fly only however.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the responses everyone. Ill pick up a couple indicators and give them a try if im skunking out on a naked line.
 

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There are not many 'fly only' lake restrictions, at least not in my region. Trophy lakes are usually bait ban, retention limits and sometimes 'artificial' fly only, so indicators or floats, swivels and split shot are ok. Lots of rivers are fly only however.
If I recall correctly there are only like 2 "fly FISHING only" lakes in BC. There are many more "artificial fly only" lakes though. The fly fishing only only lakes are the ones where arguably you cannot use anything more than a fly tied to the end of your line.

From another site here are the only two fly fishing only lakes in BC:

HEALY (Panther) LAKE 1-5 Trout release; fly fishing only, bait ban, single barbless hook

NILKITKWA LAKE 6-8 Fly fishing only, bait ban (EXCEPT dead fin fish may be used as bait when set lining; see page 9 in the Provincial Regulations)
 

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If I recall correctly there are only like 2 "fly FISHING only" lakes in BC. There are many more "artificial fly only" lakes though. The fly fishing only only lakes are the ones where arguably you cannot use anything more than a fly tied to the end of your line.

From another site here are the only two fly fishing only lakes in BC:

HEALY (Panther) LAKE 1-5 Trout release; fly fishing only, bait ban, single barbless hook

NILKITKWA LAKE 6-8 Fly fishing only, bait ban (EXCEPT dead fin fish may be used as bait when set lining; see page 9 in the Provincial Regulations)
Thank you. My point exactly, one lake on VI and one near Babine that are fly only. 2 lakes out of thousands that have this restriction. Makes sense for some rivers.
 
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