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Discussion Starter #1
i've hade it with worms and spinners for catching trout! what i'd like to know is what is good on the market today that is not to expensive i'm unsure what weight rod i need and line and so on so if anyone could point me in the right direction that would be great! thanx



C_K
 

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If it's a trout set up you're concidering, then I would suggest a 5 or 6 weight rod to start out with for stillwaters. Temple Fork puts out a pretty good product for a very reasonable price...complete with a life time waranty..
http://www.templeforkflyrods.com/

You may also want to give St. Croix Rods a look..http://www.stcroixrods.com/ and most shops carry the Dragon Fly line of fly rods and reels...which seem to be the least $$$

Typically to start out, you'd want to carry a ( matching weight) standard dry line, and a sink tip line with you're set up. If wanted you could also go with a full sink line. However if you had a chioce of two instead of three lines, then I'd deffinately carry the dry and sink tip lines. To aviod packing around a few different reels with you to house each line, you may want to purchase a reel with interchangable cartridges. I believe Dragon Fly makes the most afordable model...the BFR 355 series,around 30$...

Finder :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much Fish Finder! so basicly i want a setup with a lifetime warnty for the rod right? i'm willing to spend a couple 300 or more on one and i guess for catching salmon with a fly rod i'll need a heavier weight rod right?
 

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Yeah an 8 or 9 weight rod is essential for salmon and steelhead....I've heard from a few people here who have had their 9 weights pushed to the limit by monster chum!
 

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CK Check out this thread in Chitchat http://www.bcfishingreports.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=530. TFO makes a great rod with a life time unconditional warranty. At $99 it is the best buy outm there. FF is right about the reel as well. A dragonfly Kamlops is under $90 at most shops and mine have been trouble free as trout rods.
i'm willing to spend a couple 300 or more on one
at $99 you can buy a trout rod (5 wt) and a salmon rod (9 wt) and still have enoughleft to buy a Starbuck's coffee.
 

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One thing to remember is that sometimes buying a new tip for a less expensive rod like the Dragonfly costs just as much as the shipping and handling fee for the lifetime warranty service of rods with lifetime warranties.

I personally don't really like the stiff action of the TFO Series I rods, and don't particularly think it's the best action for a flycaster just starting to learn. The more expensive TFO rods have much better action, but of course they are triple or more the cost of a Dragonfly rod which has the moderate-fast action that is ideally suited for beginner flycasters. And really, if you end up paying less than $30 for a new tip, how many tips do you need to break to catch up to a $300 rod with a lifetime warranty? In the years and years that I've owned flyrods exclusively, I've broken maybe two tips...and both instances have been my fault (once I slammed a car door on a rod, and the other I was reefing on a 32lb chinook on my 6wt...but I was targetting cohos at the time).
 

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"FishFinder" is the name of a BCFishingReports member/moderator......we weren't talking about actual FISH FINDERS! LOL
 

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Entry level fly rod

Hey CK,

Not sure if you are still looking for a flyrod here are some other options to consider:

Redington Red Fly

Redfly 5/6 model was my first fly rod and it has decent action includes lifetime warrenty :twisted:

Next level up I would check out the Scott V2 series or Sage launch series retail around 200$

Cheers

-RC
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanx for the replys guys but i have just one more question! the fly rod and reel combo's i've seen all have plastic reels now are plastic reels way cheaper because i myself wouldn't mind buying a stainless steel or aluminum reel i'm picking up my flyrod tomorrow but i'm going to buy the reel not with the rod! any recomendations on reels? ok i lied i have one more question lol, ros cases cloth case or hard plastic? not to sure on what to get for this fly fishing stuff is all new to me! my rod is a 4 piece and i think it does come with a case like a lil brief case but i want a case that i have easy access to my rod without putting all pieces togeather i'm not sure if that makes sence but i'll wait for replies! thanx

C.K.
 

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Get yourself a decent metal reel. Most reels that are in the lower price range are made out of cast aluminum. The more expensive reels are usually machined out of bar stock aluminum. Machining allows for closer tolerances, and using bar stock provides consistent strength in the material.

Plenty of good reels under $100 out there. BFR and Dragonfly both have some decent offerings, with interchangeable cassettes to save you money later. I've heard good and bad things about Okuma Integrity...but a friend and a cousin of mine have used Integrities with good results.

If you want to just break down your rod into two pieces, then you can get a 2-piece rod and reel case for the total length of your rod. But the better cases with good padding and divided liners are going to be pricey (my single rod/reel cases are about $100/ea), and it doesn't make much sense to pay as much or more money for the case than the rod. There's unlined 2-pc cases out there for about $20 (black nylon cover with white PVC tube inside).

Good luck.
 
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Hi Stone i'm kinda new on here but i have a question? seeing that your background in flyfishing is pretty darn good i'm wondering on what is the best fly line to buy(floating&sinking)? i'm sure your knowledge is invaluable and you probably have a pretty good catch rate when it comes to fly fishing thats why i ask you! i have a half a$$ fly rod setup witch i plan to upgrade and but i have no idea on what kind of sinking line is on my reel lets just put it this way it has kinks in it all over and i will not throw flys again this year till i get new line so can you please help? i'm getting a 5 wt sage on my next payday and my reel is ok for now! thank you very much....... jiggaman......
 

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Hi Jiggaman:

There's a few factors to consider regarding your question. Do you fish mostly stillwater or streams? Also, what ballpark were you considering in spending on a line? There's a ton of good lines available out there, and something to consider is what brands your local shop carries so you can get quick service if you ever need it. Also, there are gems and duds in almost every line manufacturer's offerings...so depending on which particular type of flyline you're looking for...etc. etc.

Do you chironamid fish? For chironamid fishing, the best floating flyline that I have personally fished with is the Scientific Anglers XPS. This line is not meant for long distance casting, but is very supple and has very low or no memory. You can easily lay out a medium distance cast with it, and it lays flat on the water with no kinks. Surprisingly, the least expensive floating line that SA offers is also quite good for this application, mainly because the short belly that enables rookie flycasters to feel their rod load is also good at throwing long leaders. If you're interested in that one, it's called the SA Headstart.

Also...your choice in lines really depends on which particular model of Sage rod you end up purchasing. If you buy the faster action Sage rods, I would highly recommend matching it with the heavier SA GPX or similar line.

The absolute best sinking line that I have ever personally used is the Uniform Sink series from Scientific Anglers. They have a skinny diameter that just shoots through your guides like nothing else, and they sink the way they're designed to. I love these lines for fishing lakes.

For a clear sinking line, I use both the Cortland 444 Clear Camo (which is a slower sinking truer intermediate line) and the Cortland 444SL (which is really more of a typeII line than an intermediate). I have tried the SA Stillwater clear sinking line, but I find that they tend to crack quite easily. I have no such problems with my Cortland lines.

The most versatile line that you could buy would be a multi-tip line. While the initial purchase cost is high, it is like buying 5 quality lines at once, at less than half the cost. You will also save a lot of money in not having to buy extra spools. And you will not miss carrying all those spools in your vest. These lines are also great in stream fishing, where you often need a couple of different sinking tip rates to work a nymph well (even though technically you can sort of do all this with a floating line and some shot or weighted flies...but less effectively and with more hassle). Also, replacement tips are available for a reasonable cost...so a good multi-tip should last you a long time. I have a multi-tip line for every single one of my rod weight setup except for the lightest two, which are the 4wt and 2wt. I use RIO Versi-tips almost exclusively.

Hope I've given you a starting point. Good luck!

Stone
 
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