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Hey all,

So I'm looking to target springs on the Vedder this year for the first time and I'm hoping for some tips.

A little background - I rigged up for steelhead early this year. Bought a Fenwick medium action baitcaster and a Daiwa Luna 253 reel (also have a Luna 300). Loaded it with 17lb main line (10-12lb fluorocarbon leaders). I took a good steelheading course through Fred's and hit the river a few times, but unfortunately struck out. :(

Anyway, from what I've read on here so far, the short-float rigging and technique is pretty similar for chinook, so that's what I've been using. I was out a couple of weeks ago, using 12lb leaders (about 24") with 1/0 hooks (red) and both prawn tails and roe. Tried to target the deeper runs around Peach Rd and Tamahai Pool. Fished from mid-afternoon to dark, but only caught a few fry.

I'm not expecting any miracles, but if anyone has any advice as to technique, equipment, time-of-day, location or pagan ritual, I'd welcome your thoughts.

Looking forward to fighting my first big spring on lighter gear. :)

Regards,

Eric
 

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The Vedder is worth fishing anytime it is not closed. There are fish in the river all year long. There are, essentially three "slow" times for the gear fisher. One being late in the steelhead season (May) The next being a little blip in August, when the red spring fishery is slowing down and the coho and white spring fishery is not fully underway. The last slow spot is after the coho/chum run is tapering off in early December and the steelhead have not yet arrived in mid December.
Your set-up sounds ok, just remember, these fish do not all get along and they seek different types of water. Generally springs seek fast flowing well oxygenated water, coho prefer slower moving water and are very happy to "cruise" in deep holes and at the tailwater. Steelhead prefer water in the mid range of depth/speed and along the edges of faster water known as a seam. Main thing is to use a variety of presentations and observe very carefully where other successful fisherman are fishing and how they "manage the drift"..(amt. of weight required for different water & leader length and terminal tackle)...If you want some specifics, please feel free to pm me......Ortho 8)
 

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Hi Bud

As the other guys (n' gals?) said, you've probably got it right for starters. It takes a long time for most mortals to get good at this- it's that learning curve thing. At the same time, it can be tough when it APPEARS most everyone around you has been catching, and you're not. :wallbash: Sometimes chicken, sometimes feathers!

As a few have said, there's no better teacher than time on the water, and keeping your eyes and ears open (with filters). You notice more than when at home reading this screen. It's not a science, so, when things get rough, take a breath and look around at the scenery, and get things back into perspective. Manys the time when I've done just that, only to see something like a mink scurrying around some anglers too intent on their float to notice the cute lil' bugger. It's nice to catch fish, but to see the incidental sights and little blessings of the day, well, THAT'S fishing... It's the story of the day that counts, not the tale of the tape. If that's the case, Safeway's your best bet. You never get skunked there!

Long story short, don't stress out or try to force the issue.

Just....... Go......... Fishing.

There'll be the times like now when you think the river's dead; then there'll be times (more over the seasons) when you know there's a fish behind every rock and in every seam. That's when it gets cool!

Cheers! :beerchug:

Obie
 
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