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far from an expert as well, but I can suggest to go to the river with as many colors as you can and TRY!! I experienced that you will use different colors (even for the same species in different days) according to water clarity etc.. etc.. There is always someone next to you catching a fish first :wallbash: and that's when you look at what s/he was using and pick the color from you little wool collection!

cheers,

G
 

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You'll hear pink, salmon, peach, white, chartreuse, a bunch of others, and various combinations depending on who you ask. I think it all depends on the water clarity, species, time of day, and alignment of the planets. ;)
 

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The wool combo will catch fish in a lot of rivers throughout the province...You can combine roe bags, single eggs or plain roe or plastic Jensen eggs in a variety of colours with the wool..
My experience has been the combo of different colours,(*usually three) combined with a bait to be the most productive. Regardless of the colour/colours you use, I would keep this in mind Darker water/darker colours. That can be from a deep orange/red to a dark purple or black when the river has limited vis...
.In clearer waters I would be switching to pinks/light reds and finally white...Just my personal experience.....I also tie them in advance and put them in a leader box, as they can be a bit fussy to play with at the rivers edge............Ortho 8)
 

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fishortho said:
The wool combo will catch fish in a lot of rivers throughout the province...You can combine roe bags, single eggs or plain roe or plastic Jensen eggs in a variety of colours with the wool..
My experience has been the combo of different colours,(*usually three) combined with a bait to be the most productive. Regardless of the colour/colours you use, I would keep this in mind Darker water/darker colours. That can be from a deep orange/red to a dark purple or black when the river has limited vis...
.In clearer waters I would be switching to pinks/light reds and finally white...Just my personal experience.....I also tie them in advance and put them in a leader box, as they can be a bit fussy to play with at the rivers edge............Ortho 8)
hey Ortho, I was told and experienced my self as well that (as you said) darker water darker wool and clear water clear wool work best. however, this is a bit counterintuitive since people usually think that in dark water you need something light and bright for a better contrast and visibility of the wool. I am wondering why dark-dark clear-light works best. Is it because to much contrast looks to much artificial? :beerchug:

G
 

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In my experience I use darker colors when the water has color to it. If the squamish is muddy I will use black and purple wool because black is the most pronounced color when visiblity is low.
 

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Black wool pwned for pinks last year. In my opinion, just throw something you KNOW no one else is tossing to them. If something doesnt work or works and stops working, switch to another thing. Go through a cycle, it works very well :cheers:
 

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good point ED just chuck everything at them like your fishing for steelhead. eventually something will get a hit. I have found Dark Red to work best on springs. try it alone or with a dab of light pink,black,purple,orange....whatever but i still find that the dark red seems to be key most times.
 

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HOOK said:
good point ED just chuck everything at them like your fishing for steelhead. eventually something will get a hit. I have found Dark Red to work best on springs. try it alone or with a dab of light pink,black,purple,orange....whatever but i still find that the dark red seems to be key most times.
I read a very interesting article on springs today. As it is well known, they want whatever you use (red, pink black etc...) right on their nose while sitting at the bottom of the river. But the interesting thing I read is that it looks like they do not take it aggressively, most of the time they have it in their mouths for a second (or a fraction of it) and then spit it quickly. This results in a very light pull of the line of about one inch, which you can only feel with your thumb on the line (and recognize it!). SO, whatever color you use, it looks like springs are tough to get on the line!

G
 

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Not really.... I have had ALOT of very agressive takes on roe and wool. Many times I have gotten springs in the back of thr throat. Sometimes they spit quickly, I pull on my float as soon as it twitches just to make sure. A species that hits soft are coho. They are so smart they actually will swim with your bait/spoon the same speed it is travelling. :happy:
 

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When I fished for reds this summer on the vedder,no hit whats so ever from the fish i cought, they pick up the bait and swim with it,usually it would result in just poping your float up an inch and a quick hook set and fish was on.
 

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Hey G i like how you reference the article from this months issue of BC Outdoors :cheers: the article he is referring to is about fly fishing for springs. which does seem to be difficult most of the time. but with terminal gear you can stay in the "zone" longer therefore you will get some hard strikes especially when fishing roe. I think the one main thing that rings true is that they wont move for stuff very far maybe a foot at most so you need to get it near their face and in the general zone of their mouths. meaning NOT right on the bottom :naughty: which is why the BBing guys get them by the belly most of the time or in the sides :naughty:


I think it all depends on the day or water clarity how they strike or maybe just the fish itself LOL this past weekend of the 5/6 i hit only 2 hit hard the rest only just shook the float without even sinking it. not to mention i missed lots because i wasnt watching for such soft takes and im sure some were Coho at times, I did hook one a bit before we left but lost it :wallbash:
 

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HOOK said:
Hey G i like how you reference the article from this months issue of BC Outdoors :cheers: the article he is referring to is about fly fishing for springs. which does seem to be difficult most of the time. but with terminal gear you can stay in the "zone" longer therefore you will get some hard strikes especially when fishing roe. I think the one main thing that rings true is that they wont move for stuff very far maybe a foot at most so you need to get it near their face and in the general zone of their mouths. meaning NOT right on the bottom :naughty: which is why the BBing guys get them by the belly most of the time or in the sides :naughty:


I think it all depends on the day or water clarity how they strike or maybe just the fish itself LOL this past weekend of the 5/6 i hit only 2 hit hard the rest only just shook the float without even sinking it. not to mention i missed lots because i wasnt watching for such soft takes and im sure some were Coho at times, I did hook one a bit before we left but lost it :wallbash:
I read a lot in the last few weeks, I can't wait to go out there and try some good tip! :thumbup:

G
 

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I like to use peach for coho as well as a dark orange. Reds for springs and chartreuse mixed with either blue,pink or even a bright red for chum. This has what has worked for me in the past.
 
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