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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Besides a boat, we’ll take about when I arrive in B.C. in the spring! ;D

I need to know what is standard (if there is such a thing) boat gear for salmon fishing. I’ve done some saltwater fishing in Florida and here is a list of the gear I have:

Three med-heavy salt water spinning reels/rods, 1)-spooled with, 280/25 mono, 2)-, spooled with 300/65 power pro 3)- spooled 250/15 mono.. Two level winds 1)- One light for casting spooled with 220/20 mono, 2)- One med light trolling spooled with 320/20 mono.

I have lots of fresh water gear for Bass and trout including down riggers so I think I’m covered there, just need some help for the big water.

Any help would be appreciated.
Cheers
Rick
 

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exactly when will you be arriving, timing is everything, spring being one of the more hit and miss times of year......welcome to the board
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will be moving to the Vancouver area in May so I'm looking for suggestions for year round gear.
thanks
 

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May is deffinately a good time to show up. As for gear, what you have would be fine but maybe take a charter, it will give a great quick introduction to methods, gear and what to basically expect, also more than likely a guide will be fishing single action reels which is what about 99% us use. The 400-600 bux is well worth the expence to a new comer that wants to venture out on his/her own.
 

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Fishaholic said:
May is deffinately a good time to show up. As for gear, what you have would be fine but maybe take a charter, it will give a great quick introduction to methods, gear and what to basically expect, also more than likely a guide will be fishing single action reels which is what about 99% us use. The 400-600 bux is well worth the expence to a new comer that wants to venture out on his/her own.
Zacon/Rick..........glad to see you made it over here. I am MB-Boy from HBC.

Fishaholic hit the nail on the head for your rods........they will certainly work and I have one as a back up but I primarily use single action. There are a few good local charters in and around Vancouver that as mentioned may be worthwhile. I KNOW that they catch more fish that I do...... ;)

Keep firing away with the questions as there are a number of very good an knowledgable folks on this site and plenty of good knowledge in the salt forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to all, a charter sounds like a good idea, any recommendations?

Pippen, thanks for all the help with boat information, be expecting a lot more questions since the move is in play and my lovely wife agreed to a new boat ;D
Cheers
Rick
 

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Hey Rick.......glad to see things are in the works.  :)

These are some local Vancouver based salt charters that were just posted in another thread.

If you go with #3.........I don't think you can go wrong as I have always heard good things about him......hell if you need someone to head out I have always wanted to get out with some of the local guides and try and learn some more from their bag of tricks. ;)

1. Bon Chovy    www.bonchovy.com
2. Bonnie Lee Fishing Charters (Google them for contact info).  www.bonnielee.com
3. Predator Charters with David Korsch....this guy knows his stuff.    www.predatorcharters.com

Let me know here or on HBC if I can help you out at all.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Scott,
Thanks for the info. and #3 it will be. I will let you know when I am in the area and we can arrange something. When would be the best time to go on a charter spring/summer?
Cheers
Rick
 

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Dave fishes alll year long and right now they are targeting winter springs. If you can master hooking these puppies you will no problem when the migrating springs show up. Winter springs or feeder spring can be a challenge to catch because all they are doing is eating , these guys are not on a migration path but just following the bait. A good sounder is the best way to find them, watch the screen if you don't see any signs of bait there is a good chance the fish will not be their either. Good luck and don't wait till the spring for some action.... Bill
 

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Rick......when you do make it out I would tend to think early summer may be pretty good. Keep in touch and I will fire an e-mail off to David and ask him.

The coho's start to pile up in the local waters in the early part of the summer (again this can vary)......springs....well they are always out there but the migrating ones could likely be targetted starting late spring (June).

Fishingmagician may be able to help out a bit too. I tend to head out when the reports seem good, but the "magician" seems to be VERY well versed on the local waters. I would tend to think if you want to start heading out once you get out here in May, that the earlier the better so you can start taking advantage of the local waters as early as possible with some good knowledge. We tend to focus our efforts in the local "Vancouver" waters from early-Mid June through to mid to late September. Sometimes you just have to roll the dice out there hoping that the runs have arrived, but guys/gals on here and some other local forums are a good thing to pay attention to.

There are a lot of good guys in the salt forum who may be able to chime in like BigJay, Dogbreath, Ortho, the Magician and kisinana. (sorry if I missed anyone :-[ ;))

Keep in touch!

Scott
 

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Pippen said:
Rick......when you do make it out I would tend to think early summer may be pretty good. Keep in touch and I will fire an e-mail off to David and ask him.

The coho's start to pile up in the local waters in the early part of the summer (again this can vary)......springs....well they are always out there but the migrating ones could likely be targetted starting late spring (June).

Fishingmagician may be able to help out a bit too. I tend to head out when the reports seem good, but the "magician" seems to be VERY well versed on the local waters. I would tend to think if you want to start heading out once you get out here in May, that the earlier the better so you can start taking advantage of the local waters as early as possible with some good knowledge. We tend to focus our efforts in the local "Vancouver" waters from early-Mid June through to mid to late September. Sometimes you just have to roll the dice out there hoping that the runs have arrived, but guys/gals on here and some other local forums are a good thing to pay attention to.

There are a lot of good guys in the salt forum who may be able to chime in like BigJay, Dogbreath, Ortho, the Magician and kisinana. (sorry if I missed anyone :-[ ;))

Keep in touch!

Scott
Thanks Pippen, I spend a lot of time on local waters relative to a lot of people. I guide P/T as opposed to F/T now, and if I'm not guiding, and I'm not at my day job, I'm probably fishing on my boat, fishing on a friends boat, or doing some sort of fishing related acitivity.

My thoughts would be.....what do you want to fish for? Each month of the season has it's prime time for different species and different sizes.

A few of the "highlight" areas usually turn up year after year---however each year is a little different perhaps in the hot colour or location, or tides...and there are some times that you should definitely be fishing.

Since you're arriving in May....

I'd recommend that you get your boat rigged up...if you're going to charter which I recommend a couple of times before you go dropping cash at the tackle shop...June will probably run you over to "Thrasher" Rock---this is an expensive charter---and a long run. If you're not fishing Thrasher---you may be off the south end of Bowen or off the Fraser Mouth---that's where I'd be. July would have me off the Fraser Mouth or off West Van.

1. You'll need to ditch the spinning rods. You should buy 4 trolling or mooching rods. Single Action Reels like Shimano or Daiwa. If you're looking to make yourself out to be a big shot, you can go for the $1000 set up with Islander and mucho $$$ Sage Rods..but I'd save your $$$$ unless you're fishing all the time and you're an elitist.
2. Buy 15 lb Cannonballs. Nothing smaller. Nothing larger.
3. Release clips--make sure you have good Scotty release clips. The Powergrips.
4. Flashers---you're going to need at least 4 flashers. Hot Spot all the way. No Konezones. Any guide will tell you why.
5. Get yourself hooked up with Nikka Industries and Berry's Bait and Tackle...they'll save you $$$$.
6. Invest in a good collection of Coyote Spoons/Gypsy Spoons in the 4.0 Size. Never mind the 3.5s, Maybe a few in the 5.0 size, but don't over do it. $80 tops in this department. these are flutter type spoons and give you a big speed range---are cheap---and most of all ...THEY WORK.

Must have colours for Vancouver: Glo/Flo, Cop Car, Kermit, Blue/Nickle, Green/Nickel. Pick colours imitating the baitfish. Maybe a Punk Skunk, or Mother of Pearl too. An Army Truck Spoon too. Forget any of the fancy dancy spoons they use in the lakes.

Tied on a 4.5 to 5 foot leader for feeders---perhaps a 6 or 7 foot leader for mature springs. These spoons work well for Mature Springs too...particularly the glow flo, Army Truck, or Mother of Pearl.

7. 40 lb test leader material. Tie everything with this stuff it'll save you gear.
8. Hootchies. For When sockeye opens...the guys at the tackle shops I mentioned will hook you up. Never mind the dummy flashers..you don't need 'em...however...they do help....but when the sockeye are in thick...you'll do just fine without the dummies. Tackle expense is about $5 for a package of these. 28 to 32 inch leader---on 40 lb test minimum.
9. Hootchies for the rest of the year...you probably shouldn't bother...there's more effective ways to fish. However, an "Army Truck", and a "Blood and Bones" are definitely good ones to have on board if you don't want to fish all your rods with bait. At least until you learn the rest of the basics about trolling. Forget learning how to mooch around Vancouver, the trollers will open a can of whoopass on you in the prime locations, and they'll probably outfish you badly. You probably don't need any more than about 6 hootchies in your tackle box. Tied on 40 lb test, 35 inch leader for springs. Anything longer and you better be moving fast to get action. Anything longer and you better have a ton of fish around.
10. Learn how to tie up Anchovy rigs, and Herring Teaser rigs. You'll need these when fishing bait like 5 inch herring and 4 to 6 inch Anchovies. You match these to the size of fish in the area at the time...if there are BIG fish, fish BIG bait. Also get yourself a small tupperware container and some pickling salt/fisheries salt for brining about a half dozen or dozen depending on how many rods you're going to fish with.
11. Buy the most expensive hooks you can afford. I recommend some spare stainless steel Mustads for the spoons, and nothing but Gamakatsus for the bait rigs. Forget the VMC and Owner Hooks...not worth your time or money and don't listen to what the tackle shops will tell you. Gamakatsus are expensive, and they'll pay for themselves..trust me they stay sharp!!! The others will rust or lose their sharpness---and won't resharpen that well. Get yourself some good beadchain swivels for your rod end that attaches to the flasher. use a beadchain when fishing with bait, and a barrel swivel when fishing with the hoochies. Some quick change snaps for swapping lures on the lure end of the flasher. Cheap...like $10 for all the gear.
12. A basic fish finder capable of reading to about 300 feet of water. Anything more expensive is just your personal taste. You just need to see bottom, and bait. That's it.

13. All the other types of lures---fuhgeddaboudit...not needed and not necessary. Do the others work...yep...many of the others do..but not needed, and the above stuff will do you just fine. If you're fishing elsewhere on the coast, I'd recommend a whole lot more..but not required and not needed around Vancouver/Georgia Strait.

14. A tide book and charts of the area....know where you're fishing and why, and the right tides to fish for best results. Get a copy of the regs, buy an annual salmon fishing license with a Chinook Stamp. Learn how to identify wild and hatchery fish, and the 5 species of salmon.

By no means complete, but the tackle and attaching hardware expense will likely run you about $200 and the rods and reels will probably set you back around $150 each.

15. A Diary. Keep a log of the situation at the end of your trip----where, when, how, what, etc...will prove useful for later years (hint hint)

I'm not going to spill and spell out all the timelines locales, lures, techniques, and locations here, but I'd recommend reading the fishing reports week by week, and getting out on the water as much as possible heeding the advice of those reports by different operators. One thing you can do is learn the names and appearances of the charter boats, and go out and fish where they fish, and that'll give you a very good indication of what's going on. Get your hands on a couple of books...fishing for salmon by Charlier White..the basics...and the advanced techniques books. Good reading for you..and explains the tackle and fish behaviours. Guides use channel 88 Alpha or 88A as a working channel. Listen in and you may hear a juicy morsel of information.

If you're looking for a "behind the scenes and involved look" at what's going on... chartering will help you out, but it ain't cheap to go 4 to 5 times a season at different times with a pocketbook set for longer charters than the standard 5 hour fare---if you're passionate about fishing 5 hours goes by in a wink of an eye and doesn't get you too far unless the fishing is close.

However, I don't want to mislead anyone, it's not Shangri-La out there in Vancouver area waters, we've got a lot of water to cover, and it's not like we have a conveyor belt of fish swimming by, and we do have a Fraser River with tons of run off shutting down the feeding behaviors of mature fish moving into the area. The Fraser River is a bit of a mixed blessing for us here in Vancouver. If this were Sooke, or Port Hardy, we'd have hundreds and hundreds of boats out on a given weekend.

Anyways, to get the hang of fishing in the Vancouver area---be prepared to invest lots of time and money for gas---as you'll burn lots of it fishing throughout the season. Don't go racing all over the place like a madman---rather pick a spot and work the area thoroughly, however, that's not to say you shouldn't change spots. Have a plan, have a strategy.


At some of the best times, fishing in Vancouver is challenging enough to send seasoned guides from other places on the coast wimpering away mumbling "fishing sucks in Vancouver" and "there ain't no fish" with their tails between their legs.

If anything, if fishing is your passion, you probably won't be too discouraged after a skunking or few.
 

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Excellent post 'majician...you got a good deal of the basics covered.....The only thing I would add for a newbie coming to the coast is:
Study the marine charts really closely
Know the bottom in the area you plan to fish
Understand the tides and fish both sides of the flood and ebb
Understand how the tides are affected by bottom structure
(a trip to the mouth of the Cap when it is busy can be interesting, especially if you don't understand how the tides affect your gear)
Always keep all your safety gear on board and plan ahead....The inside waters are just as dangerous as the warters on the outside and the "graveyard of the pacific' handle doen't just refer to the off shore waters.
Welcome to the BCFR forum and the "WET" coast.....................Ortho 8)
 

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fishortho said:
Excellent post 'majician...you got a good deal of the basics covered.....The only thing I would add for a newbie coming to the coast is:
Study the marine charts really closely
Know the bottom in the area you plan to fish
Understand the tides and fish both sides of the flood and ebb
Understand how the tides are affected by bottom structure
(a trip to the mouth of the Cap when it is busy can be interesting, especially if you don't understand how the tides affect your gear)
Always keep all your safety gear on board and plan ahead....The inside waters are just as dangerous as the warters on the outside and the "graveyard of the pacific' handle doen't just refer to the off shore waters.
Welcome to the BCFR forum and the "WET" coast.....................Ortho 8)
yeah..it's going to be an adventure for him. I got tired of typing so I stopped. Whew! LOL!

I just hope the poor guy doesn't get discouraged after a few tries. So many people have already packed it in out of preference for concentrating efforts elsewhere on the coast---where success does come easy much of the time. He should have some fun picking up Pinks...and if Sox show up in any kind of fishable numbers---he should get a couple of cracks at those too...and a mature spring may be wishful thinking for a newb...but he'll learn the ropes with a couple of 200 yard runs...

Being the fishing nut that I am, I've worked on and employed a few ideas aimed at hooking more fish and being more strategic...and it's provided me some good success thus far. Going to be interesting to apply this knowledge in 2007. What I've discovered and learned thus far has been surprising to a few of the old salts in the industry down here.

I may let the cat out of the bag later this season about what I've been doing....but for now I'll just keep those under wraps....

hint: it's about what people have STOPPED doing as opposed to are still doing. :) :)

Tightlines dude, and welcome to BC!

What type of boat do you have?
 

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fishinmagician said:
hint: it's about what people have STOPPED doing as opposed to are still doing. :) :)
Magician.........are you dragging a net behind your boat or dropping dynamite in the water? ;) :eek:

I have had a pretty extensive conversation with zaconb on a hunting forum that I frequent and we have chatted quite a bit about the "boating" out here and what to expect aside from fishing. By the sounds of his experience he certainly doesn't sound like a quitter but moreso someone who is going to be one of the "good ones" out on the water. We'll just have to see how cool his head stays on a busy day in late August out in front of the Cap. ;D ;) No offense at all Rick.......once you have seen it, you'll understand the sh*t show we speak of.
 

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I am not sure of your boating experience, but taking a Power Squadron Boating Course would be a definite asset. The other thing aside from the types of fish that you will really notice is water depths and tides. You can be 100 feet off shore and have 300 feet of water. Fishing in the inner waters we have tide changes a day ie 2 highs and 2 lows and the range can be 16 feet from high to low. Because of our proximity to mountains the winds can change over the course of a summer day from dead still to choppy white caps in as little as an hour with the outflow winds in the inlets.
I don't want scare you, I want you to enjoy what we experience here.
Watch other fishermen and stop by the sporting goods stores to pick up the daily chit chat. Check this board in advance of heading out.
 

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Pippen said:
fishinmagician said:
hint: it's about what people have STOPPED doing as opposed to are still doing. :) :)
Magician.........are you dragging a net behind your boat or dropping dynamite in the water? ;) :eek:

I have had a pretty extensive conversation with zaconb on a hunting forum that I frequent and we have chatted quite a bit about the "boating" out here and what to expect aside from fishing. By the sounds of his experience he certainly doesn't sound like a quitter but moreso someone who is going to be one of the "good ones" out on the water. We'll just have to see how cool his head stays on a busy day in late August out in front of the Cap. ;D ;) No offense at all Rick.......once you have seen it, you'll understand the sh*t show we speak of.
Nope..no nets, no dynamite. ::) It has to do with mature springs.

It may be a bit of a shock off the Cap on a busy day---70 boats, the average of about 50, however, relative to the Buoy 10 fishery in Oregon, it's a slice of cake and a latte! It's not 300 boats.

A few things I forgot to add---we're BARBLESS, so even if he buys barbed hooks, PINCH EVERYTHING. They're here to stay and not going away.

1. Barbless hooks all the way. Pinchin the barbs is just fine---and will likely save you $$$ over manufactured barbless. Don't ask why.
2. RCAs "Rockfish Conservation Areas"---learn where they are---no fishing with hook and line in these areas---period. Not such a big deal anyways, but relevant none the less.
3. Treble hooks off West Vancouver (Area 28) are NOT allowed in the "Triangle" as outlined in the regs---they haven't been enforcing this, and it's a dumb regulation--but abide by it just the same.
4. If you're targetting Cohoes specifically off West Van---a wonderbread Coyote 4.0 is a must have--or Coyote Spoons in the Glo Flo 4.0. Careful, you may hook a spring on either. Or.... hootchies work well..but not needed---as coyote spoons and anchovies do very well.

Tight lines
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Gentlemen all I can say is thank you!! I’ve printed your responses and will be studying them nightly!! I can’t tell you how excited I am about the fishing opportunities in B.C. and for the record I am a fisherman through and through and on a good week I fish 4 times a week and that’s with a steady job. I have no delusions about my B.C. salt water fishing experience and that is why again I say thank you for the help.
I have some “big water experience”, I grew up on P.E.I chasing mackerel in the summer and Blue Fin Tuna in the fall, and I also have spent tons of time on the ocean as a Fisheries technician and inshore rescue. I’ve also been fortunate enough to head south for big saltwater game.
Getting fish would be great but I just love to be out on a boat fishing!! If I were worried about getting skunked I’d give up both fishing and Hunting ;D
Sorry it took so long to reply.
Cheers
Rick
 
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