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Hi folks,

I did a search on this site and couldn't find any other info regarding what to do with your rod after a hookup and you can't prevent the fish from jumping. There appears to be two schools of thought - one, you lift the tip to keep the line taught so you lessen the chances of the fish spitting the hook. The other suggests you 'bow' to the fish or drop your rod tip so you don't rip the hook out of the fish's mouth or snap the leader. Any thoughts?
 

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Fishing for bass and walleye when I was a kid, we always kept the rod tip high in the same way you fight a fish with a fly rod. The second you lower that rod tip, the fish will spit the hook.
 

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In my experiences when a fish jumps, depending on its size, you should quickly lower your rod tip to water level to get the most line in the water to minimize slack line. That little bit of slack takes the pressure off the hook and it could rotate out.

Cheers!

-Nathan in NW
 

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With Nathan on this one. A fish spits a hook when it is able to twist and turn against the pressure of the hook. I there is no pressure, the is no mechanical advantage for the fish. Dropping your rod tip leaves a bit of slack and prevents the dreaded hook spit. 11th Waqrrior, this applies only when a fish is jumping, not when it is fighting in the water.
 

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Obviously a fish doesn't actually 'spit' the hook but rolls off the hook if it's barbless. Much harder for the fish to do this in midair if it is not on a tight line so 'fish in the water-rod tip high, jumping fish-rod tip in the water'. Seems to work for me.
 

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I can say with complete honesty that i have never thought about what to do when a fish jumps as it happens so fast, i think i just watch in excitement and hope for the best, besides it doesn,t much matter to me if i loose a fish or two from them jumping out of the water. However I would like to put a twist on this question, do you think it would make any difference if the fish was jumping towards you or away from you in making the decision to lower or raise your rod tip to them? Maybe one could add a figure eight into the battle when the fish wants to do a cartwheel in mid flight.
 

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An old timer told me years ago that when a fish jumps, "Bow to the fish". So always drop your rod tip.
 

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seems to me if your rod tip is up when it jumps why not keep it up.by the time you bow its back in the water anyway
 

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I have also never thought about this topic either. I have a 95% hook to land ratio and always keep my rod tip up. I use lighter rods
so that the rod does all the work. I have found over the years that the heavier 12-20 lb rated rods don't "work" as much and it is
much easier to lose the fish.
 

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More food for thought is how much line is actually in the water as the fish goes air born. Almost all of the time theres a bow in the line as the fish runs then jumps. I think thats what causes the hook to pop, all of a sudden that loose bow in the line is out of the water and there isnt enough tension to keep the hook in. An angler that is applying enough pressure will keep that hook in place, Ive had a bunch of awe inspiring battles where when that fish jumps 3' clear of the water as it cartwheels and rolls in slow motion you stand there stunned forgetting whats happening and thats when the hook pops lol.
 

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I mightbe off base here, but I think the whole "bow to the fish" thing is much more applicable to fly fishing. A fish that has been down deeep in the water (and dragged the thick fly line down with it) and then comes rushing to the top, is dragging a lotg of resistant fly line behind it. This presents a lot of pressure on the hook, and can make it much easier for the hook to twist or yank out or for the leader/tippet to break. I think the same effect is not as frequent with a line of mono. I am not sure if it really is a concern to gear fishers, but I can assure you that in my experience with a fly rod, many fish are lost in the air when the angler doesn't react and lower the rod tip. More so in lakes than in rivers tho'.:2cents:
 

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Interesting thoughts. I do know too much tension can potentially pop a hook from the mouth of a leaping fish. Truthfully I never give it too much thought in the midst of a good fight. One thing that does come to mind though, is this as an important if you were playing a fish from a good postion above the water..ie: a high bank or a boat?

Finder
 

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I mightbe off base here, but I think the whole "bow to the fish" thing is much more applicable to fly fishing. A fish that has been down deeep in the water (and dragged the thick fly line down with it) and then comes rushing to the top, is dragging a lotg of resistant fly line behind it. This presents a lot of pressure on the hook, and can make it much easier for the hook to twist or yank out or for the leader/tippet to break. I think the same effect is not as frequent with a line of mono. I am not sure if it really is a concern to gear fishers, but I can assure you that in my experience with a fly rod, many fish are lost in the air when the angler doesn't react and lower the rod tip. More so in lakes than in rivers tho'.:2cents:
You can take your :2cents: to the bank professori :thumbup:
Typically on the first big run when a large Tarpon (insert large missle of choice) comes out of the water you are leaning on him hard enough to flatten out a 13wt uber fast fly rod and all of your 120' line (+ 150yds of backing) is underwater, if you don't release some of the tension by bowing to it it will either pull the hook or break your tippet.
I do bow all the time out of habit but not enough to allow slack line,
 

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to bow or not to bow

I think the theory does transfer somewhat to gear fishing as well, with the same thought of a quick rise to the surface and out of the water adding a significant bow of line under water. Factor in the effect of a decent current on that line and you have a significant and sudden increase in the load that your mainline is exerting on your leader. I have had success dropping my tip shortly after a fish leaves the water to allow the tension to even out and my drag to react, with fewer fish coming free this way as opposed to keeping the pressure on the line. I guess this is more in the interest of stopping a leader from breaking as opposed to allowing the hook to work free, although I am also of the opinion that too much pressure can pull a hook free as well.
 

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I have always been taught to keep the rod high , but on the other hand I lose a lot of fish!
That is the theory I was taught as well, I lost many a fish untill I saw a film about salmon fishing in europe for Atlantics. They preached Bowing to the Fish, and I watched the guy more-so follow the fish with his rod as it tumbled out of the water. I started trying this when catching rainbows and have been fairly successful as of late keeping those fish attached through cartwheels. I suppose its almost a combination of the two techniques giving and taking depending on direction of the jump, if hes comming at me my rod goes up but if hes taking off, the tip goes down.
 

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(When a fish jumps) From what Ive seen lately in bass fishing and fly fishing, I think keeping the rod tip down, or bowing when they jump is the right thing to do. As the fish changes directions, the fisherman is supposed to point the rod tip in the opposite direction keeping the rod tip low to the water. You dont want to pull the fish towards the surface making it jump by holding your rod tip up.
Thanks WFN!!! lol
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hi, were not talking about reeling in the fish, just when it jumps.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Ahhh....the Fysics of Phish.........

My old trout fishing mentor taught me to "bow to the fish" if using barbed hooks but always keep the tension on with barbless. Usually accompanied by a loud expletive, although the latter is my own addition....
 
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