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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
young gun said:
Pinkworm/Blades = fish them fast and fish them last!
Nice read...

Can someone elaborate a bit on the reason as to why to fish pink worms last? I have recently started trying to become more confident in using worms and so far I been very unsuccesful. I continue to use them because I know they work, I have seen many people successful with using them. I have been using them exclusively to try and cut back on the constant gear changes and to try and learn the worm useage. I am losing confidence fast however.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you
 

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The first point I'll make Thrasher is, although it is good to use some items more than others, ie: "exclusively", as you put it, due to the confidence it provides over time, it will limit the number of fish you could catch if you don't mix things up a little. Often fish will ignore one item and hammer another...if you are going to take the route of limiting the number of terminal items you use, I would limit that number to two or three things, rather than just one. My choice, if a pink worm were one of them, would be to complement that with an item that is small, like say, a jensen egg and wool or something of that nature. This will allow you to present two very different looking items, and give those stubborn fish an alternative option if they aren't taking the worm.

Now, as for fishing worms last, well...I'm not certain, as I rarely fish them, but will speculate based on my experience with blades. Often anglers will fish more traditional gear, like roe bags, wool, shrimp, etc...and there are times when fish are present and they won't touch any of these items. In these cases, I will throw something unusual and flashy. Something big, that they don't see so often, and they slam the float down almost like they are angry, no subtle takes here. This is the response I often see when I switch to blades after fishing other items unsuccessfully. They will frequently hammer such items out of aggression, or even frustration. Being so tight lipped through prior presentations, I feel it might have a lot to do with infringing on their space, or territory. Now this is theory obviously, but I think having some large, obnoxious item coming at them after they have been repeatedly "pestered" by common gear all day, causes them to strike out of pure frustration, or anger. This is often why people will toss worms and other similar items last, as although they don't entice the majority of fish, they do get a response from the sulking pestered fish that has been sitting down there all day avoiding all the usual suspects...

In a way, I guess the gear you toss at them is like a circuit within a circuit...many anglers follow a pattern not only in the places or routes they fish, but also in the gear they chuck...
Hope that helps,
rib
 

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It is no secret that I have caught a lot of fish on "blades" over the years and I make my own "special blend" for those stubborn fish that Rib has so well defined above. My question to the board is how big is big? I just stick to size 4 hammered 50/50 with (my additions) and a gammy siwash.(I make my own).........anybody else want to comment on the size issue? I use this size in all water conditions and although it seems large in my hand it is nowhere near the size of a #65 Illusion spoon that works very well in deep fast, clear water............Ortho 8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks rib for your response.

I can see the reason as to why to fish it last. That makes sense, essentially throwing something they normally don't see. I have been using the pink worm only trying to learn it I suppose. You are right, it is definitely limiting the fish I may be missing. But where do you draw the line and figure that if "A, B, or C" isn't getting the fish, then it's time to roll on. I know that I could start throwing roe or other methods, but I was just trying to find some success with the worm. I'm sure the hit will eventually come, I guess it's just a matter of whether I can stand the drought in the interim. I think it's time to mix in a jig or roe.

Does anyone else follow the "fish the pink worm last" rule?
 

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Thrasher said:
But where do you draw the line and figure that if "A, B, or C" isn't getting the fish, then it's time to roll on.
This one will come back to your efficiency on the river. If you throw bait/lure A, B and C at the fish and they don't take chances are the fish either aren't there or just aren't interested or lockjawed. You could spend an extra hour on that hole and try baits D, E, F and G and it might produce a strike, and it might not. If it did, great, if it didn't you just wasted an hour that you could have been at the next run on your circuit. The more water you cover in a day definitely increases your chances of getting into fish. Once I have covered a run to my satisfaction I move on. I will spend a little more time on the areas that I know have produced fish in the past.

As for fishing the pink worms last, I sometimes will use them as an end of the day last ditch effort to entice a nearby lurker to strike.
 

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I believe that they bite out of curiosity.Like said before it's something they haven't seen and are curious.

They bite out of aggression.I've had a few fish caught on pinkes that seem to have fought harder with this in their mouth than ther other. Especially bucks! The strikes here are spectacular.


Or they are simply hungry and you've timed it right.




Hotrod
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thank you to everyone who has contributed a post to my question!

As always, everyone is very helpful!

I have been away for a little while, but it is great to be back!
 

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well said steelie 99




(In response to original thread, see steelie99's post: "Steelhead Circuit"...)
 

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Or you can just target fresh fish that havent been hooked 5 times nor seen nearly the amount of gear, leave the stacking wild ones in the upper river alone ;D In that case a blade, pink work (depending on current speed) bugs, roe or whatever. They will all catch fish, it is just a matter of putting it in eye sight of the fish. Cover tons of water if a fish does not bite on the first cast its not worth catching.
 

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On the topic of why fish hit certain things, I have heard that certain lures or baits provoke the "strike reflex" in a fish. Just as it says it is a reflex, something planted in the fishes brain right from the get go. It makes the fish attack things that have the attributes of a natural food source, such as flashy metallic colors, and the wounded wobbling motion. I have seen, on many occasions, very small minnows chase down a lure 2 or 3 times their size. I doubt that this is out of agression or anger, they just attack it because its a reflex. I have also seen spawned out salmon of all species take a whack at my offering. These fish are definately not feeding, they just have the strike reflex ingrained into their pea sized brains. This could be why fish hammer some lures so hard. I think that fish strike at natural type baits, more out of instinct than as an uncontrolabe reflex. This is just what I've read, and it makes sense to me. Take it or leave it. ;D

About the worms, I fished them with good sucess last year, and I usually let water conditions decide when I fish them. Low and clear, and the worm will probably come out last, but in high water I have no worrys about throwing it first.
 

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Agreed!..........Good points, Chris.............little pink worms do not rule. Experience rules........ ;)
Tight lines..........Ortho 8)
 

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Good point on the reflex angle there chris, I hadn't considered that, but it makes good sense. It makes you wonder doesn't it? Obviously such items work, and it is impossible to know why the fish strike...as we aren't in their heads, but I like that angle. I too have seen tiny fish do this very thing Chris mentioned...

However, if it is "more out of instinct", why do such lures or baits not provoke such responses more often? I have witnessed fish of all sizes ignore such instinct provoking lures at various times as well. Don't get me wrong here Chris, I think your statement holds great credence and is quite valid...now, I know what some of you are thinking, maybe the fish learn their lesson? Maybe they hit such items once or twice and then stop when they realize it is not food. Although I think this is quite possible, I'm still not convinced we've hit the nail on the head yet...

What I find interesting is what Chris said at the end of his post: "but in high water I have no worries about throwing it first"...maybe it is simply a visibility issue. Now, follow me on this one. Could it be that, just like ourselves, and all other animals on the planet, steelhead aren't always on the lookout for food? Maybe in these cases they are more preoccupied with their migration, or with pairing up with a mate, or whatever...maybe in these instances they don't see our smaller presentations just because they are focused on something else? Almost all animals on the planet are opportunists. Not solely opportunists mind you, but when an opportunity for a free meal shows itself most creatures will take it. Maybe, just maybe, something large enough and flashy enough is what it takes to get their attention, allowing them to see it in their peripheral if you will...and they respond to it as an opportunity they can't resist...

I'm sure all of these theories are valid at some point or another... I'm just throwing ideas around here. I'd be interested to hear what you guys think, since the topic has come up, it provokes some thought obviously by Chris's great point and my rambling response that followed...
We all want to know why steelhead strike. We'd probably all want to know more so however, why they don't strike, as these are the days we often find ourselves scratching our heads...

Do they learn? Do they strike out of instinct? Anger? Is it just a matter of them seeing the item more than anything else...? Barometric pressure? On a whim? Weigh in guys...What are you theories...?
 

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Hey, i said fish them fast and fish them last because, after pounding the run with everything i switch to those, and i fish the run, and i push the fish back to the tail out unless they hit up top, and when they finally reach the tail out they got no more room to go but down the rapids, so either they will hit the worm or the blade then or they will either take off down the white water or just ignore it. Usually it will either be a strike or the fish will bale out down the run!
 

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Nothing wrong with what you said young gun, yours was a great point too... ;)

Of those fish that hit instead of leaving the pool as you put it, why do you think they strike rather than leave?
 

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out of agression, they rather get rid of the thing bugging them then waste energy and also move to a spot that doesn't suite them. if i got tormented enough i would fight back.
 

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Just something to think about guys.All the days I have spent on the flow over the years, the worm is right up there in the big three.I have had great results with a worm in low and gin clear water.That is all I am going to say.Think about action being a huge factor for hooking steelhead.A marabou jig and a rubber worm produce almost the same action underwater.Don't think so much about the drift but the presentation of your gear or fly underwater.I don't fish jigs to often.The reason being they remind me of walleye fishing back in the day in my home town but they do work. 8)


Cheers sage
 

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I have found great sucsess fishing worms in the past. One thing I'am a firm believer of is, to have confidence in your offering no matter what you choose. Some like one bait more than others. Sometimes one thing works one day and fails another. Worms fished in slower moving (walking speed) water off shorter leaders can produce good results, in this type of setting. Plastics such as 6 inch worms, and gooey bobs tend to be more bouyant so the shorter leader will aid in keeping the offering down into the fish's zone in colder water.

Finder ;)
 

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sage2106lb said:
I have had great results with a worm in low and gin clear water
I agree, as the times I have used pink worms have all been in low clear water, and I enjoyed success...

sage2106lb said:
Think about action being a huge factor for hooking steelhead.
This seems to be a recurring theme, the action of a lure...Chris mentioned it when discussing blades, and I am sure this plays a major role. So, we have:

-The action or movement a lure or bait displays (the breathing, flowing motion of jigs or worms, or the wounded wobbling motion of a blade, or a lively little goh shrimp wiggling around)

- The forcing a fish to take it or bail, by pushing it down a run, aggravating it to strike

- Scent. Bait's like roe bags, or wool, etc...soaked in various scents

- Imitation. The appearance of food. Ie: jensen eggs, gooey bobs, wool, etc tumbling down through the current looking like eggs that have been washed downstream...

I'm sure more points will come up as this progresses, but maybe looking at this from the other side of the coin will help...

Why do you guys think the fish "turn off"? I'm sure we've all experienced days when we now the fish are there, but they just don't want to play...I know I've been there, perfect conditions, knowing the fish are in the river from reports and first hand accounts in days prior, yet the fish seem to have disappeared and won't take a thing...

I've been toying with the idea of how barometric pressure changes might affect them. I've begun to consider that maybe as the pressure drops, and a low pressure cell is coming in, the fishing tends to fall off quite a bit...

Any comments, or other theories?
 

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Definately an interesting theory Rib. I would be interested to hear what your findings would be.
 

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On the flip side rib why the fish seem to turn off. In my opinion I don't think they really turn off.I think the instinct is always there to strike if the fish can see the bait coming towards them. To get them to grab it is another story. I have fished summer-runs and have had a fish go to grab my hook and turn away afew times before I finally hooked it.My therory is every run on a river has a key for it.You just have to solve it to unlock the reward. As for the other factors like barometric pressure and water temp.Does this make a differance, for me I don't think so 8)

Cheers sage 8)
 
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