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I am fairly new to salt trolling and was wondering if it is bettter to troll with or against the current.he only action I'v had was against,yet the lure companies say to troll with?Any suggestions out there?
 

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i"m no expert but I have started tracking my catches over the last 4 months and I've caught fish both with and against the flow. Most people will say with the flow but I'm not convinced as I've caught quite a few particularly in the last couple months against...I think it's more important to just make sure that your "angles" are ok....Meaning if your downrigger line is going straight down you won't be getting any action on the gear. I find if you are hunting for the fish you need to go with the flow in order to cover ground to find the fish. If you are against it it takes so long to make any ground. If I'm in really heavy current such as at times near Ambleside I will go with the flow to my outer limit then haul everything in and race back to the start and go again...Like I say I'm no expert just based on my limited experience and success...
 

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I think I have more luck going into a medium current especially with spoons. I didn't used to like the rigger line going way back, but the last few years I like it better with spoons because I think I get more bites to hook-up with the higher water speed. Less nibble and spits. Herring or Anchoves I prefer a little slower water speed. Sometimes it's hard to go into the current and keep it on the basement, so if the basement is important, into the current is tough.
 

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I try to keep a mental log in my head when I'm out and also watch other boats that hook up with fish. I find it about 75-80% with the current the rest against. How many are succesfull at slack? thats supposed to be the best time in my understanding. :2cents:
 

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My :2cents: says with the current, around slack ideally, and depending on how familiar you are with bottom, at about 45 degree angles (or S-turns) across dropoffs and tide flows, depending on how deep you are fishing. My latest luck is still cut plug, with a little red dot (from a bait marker) on the side when I am getting desperate. Hope this helps.
 

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It depends on the place, I've always liked fishing with the currant around the Cap but I would say the sucess in was 60% - 40%, mainly cause of better control of the ball on the bottom. On the other hand at the bell bouy no direction has out fished another. However, there is a time that is the best and that is crossing that first push of the incoming tide. For fifty meters before and after crossing that water is the fishiest. That line has always produced well for me in the summer, but you need the right day to see it.
Into the sun doesn't produce well.

Have fun, Jason
 

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at Cap/Ambleside/Pink, over the past few years I've caught all of my fish with my bow pointed west, Northwest, Southwest.
None with my bough pointed East (toward the bridge).

Regardless of the tide.

Of the fish I've seen hooked there, probably 90% heading west.

Over at Spanish Banks, near the bell bouy, most of my fish have been caught heading east, but I've seen hookups in all directions.
 

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Boatman38:

Think of it this way: salmon head into the current because that where the food comes from. That’s why they spend their time on the lee side of an obstruction. To them they conserve energy letting the food come to them so if you fish against the current then you’re coming from behind them and, chances are, you’ll miss the fish’s view.

Same thing with tide lines. Fish on the side where the food goes to moved by the current.

If you’re fishing with the current and you’re facing the sun chances are the fish will be deeper than if the situation were reversed. Take that into account.

Also, bait fish are more often than not swept by current. Salmon know this and they know their next meal comes from that direction.

MichaelR
 

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I would have to agree with tsweet. I always keep an eye on my angles and spend less time watching the current. I f you keep angles in the acceptable range, your gear will do what it is supposed to, and that will attract fish!
 
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